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Eighth Language and Linguistics Student Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 4:27pm
Language Society at the University of Central Oklahoma

THE LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS STUDENT CONFERENCE
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2015
NIGH UNIVERSITY CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA (EDMOND)

"Students engaging, transforming, and empowering students"

Abstract submission deadline: Monday, September 21, 2015
Acceptance notification: Monday, October 5, 2015
Registration deadline: Monday, October 19, 2015

CFP: Literature and Censorship (Deadline: September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 9:50am
Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry (Vol 2 Issue 2)

India is one of the few countries in the world to have a film censor board. And one of its recent casualties is a lesbian film significantly titled "Unfreedom." The current government has upped the ante by extending the ban culture of censorship from the aesthetic realm to the realm of everyday consumption with the ban on beef. The ban on Jafar Panahi, the Iranian filmmaker, continues and he continues to express himself in his art form in house arrest. The recent Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris has put the limelight back on censorship.

[CfP] On the Footsteps of Dwarves: Different Readings of a Mythical Figure in Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 4:51am
Dr. Feryal Cubukcu / Dr. Sabine Planka

Today more than ever fairy tales permeate pop culture, literature, music, fine arts, opera, ballet and cinema. Speaking of the history of stories and especially fairy-tales, we may say that the Pot of Soup, the Cauldron of Story, has always been boiling for centuries. Dwarves have always been a recurring image and a character from the fairy tales to the novels.

[UPDATE/CORRECTED] Final Call for Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, Legend Area (6/15/15; New London, NH 10/30-31/15)

updated: 
Sunday, June 7, 2015 - 8:04pm
Michael Torregrossa / Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, and Legend Area Chair

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS
EIGHTH-ANNIVERSARY SESSIONS OF THE
SCIENCE FICTION, Fantasy, HORROR, AND LEGEND AREA
Online at NEPCA Fantastic: http://nepcafantastic.blogspot.com

2015 Conference of The Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association (NEPCA)
Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire
Friday 30 October and Saturday 31 October 2015
Proposals by 15 June 2015

RSA 2016: Reading Form in European Renaissance Poetry [Abstract Deadline 7 June]

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 4:07pm
Discipline of Comparative Literature

Reading Form in European Renaissance Poetry

RSA 2016, Boston

Sponsored by the Discipline of Comparative Literature

Papers sought that offer historical interpretations of poetic form. How do Renaissance poets, theorists, and readers interpret and classify formal features of verse (including rhyme, meter, and generic forms like the sonnet or the epigram)? How do poets use form to position themselves in literary history? What is the relationship between poetic practice and the poetic theories presented in manuals and defenses of poetry? Comparative and multi-lingual papers especially encouraged.

The Hermeneutics of Hell: Devilish Visions and Visions of the Devil in World Literature

updated: 
Friday, June 5, 2015 - 12:42pm
Dan Russ and Gregor Thuswaldner

Call for Submissions: The Hermeneutics of Hell: Devilish Visions and Visions of the Devil in World Literature

"There are two equal and opposite errors into which our race can fall about the devils. One is to disbelieve in their existence. The other is to believe, and to feel an excessive and unhealthy interest in them. They themselves are equally pleased by both errors, and hail a materialist or magician with the same delight." C. S. Lewis. The Screwtape Letters

[DEADLINE EXTENDED: JUNE 6, 2015] Whose (French) Renaissance? RSA Boston, March 31 - April 2, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, June 3, 2015 - 1:37pm
Renaissance Society of America

Complicating the notion of the 'French Renaissance,' this panel seeks papers that explore the dynamic relationship between Italian artists and their French patrons, audiences, and counterparts in the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century courts of Charles VIII, Francis I, Henry II and Henry IV. We are interested in investigations into the ways in which these artists realized their royal commissions by participating in, subverting, and creating artistic dialogues. Rather than simply importing visual language, humanist discourses, and artistic debates into French contexts, Italian artists and their French patrons mediated different processes of material, contextual, and formal translations.

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