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rhetoric and composition

Critical Thinking and Writing, Open Call

updated: 
Friday, June 23, 2017 - 11:53am
Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 24, 2017

Double Helix: A Journal of Critical Thinking and Writing publishes work addressing linkages between critical thinking and writing, in and across the disciplines, and it is especially interested in pieces that explore and report on connections between pedagogical theory and classroom practice. The journal also invites proposals from potential guest editors for specially themed volumes that fall within its focus and scope.

 

Advisory Board

Michele Eodice

Anne Geller

Suzanne S. Hudd

Neal Lerner

Sally Elizabeth Mitchell

Tim Moore

Robert A. Smart

Kathleen Blake Yancey

 

Creating Safer Spaces in English Composition Courses After the 2016 Election

updated: 
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 11:44am
Northeast Modern Language Association - 2018 Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This roundtable will look at pedagogical strategies for examining the 2016 election in Standard Freshman English Composition courses. English Composition instructors are struggling with approaching relevant concepts (ex. argument) and reading selections that do not alienate portions of the classroom with every choice. While it would be ideal, it is not necessarily feasible or responsible to be bi-partisan with every lesson plan. Submissions should present pedagogical approaches that stimulate constructive inquiry, application of course concepts, and/or address concerns of partisan discourse (in the texts, by instructors, or students).

Textual Soundscapes and Oral Archives (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 11:51am
Alba Sola Garcia / Victor Sierra Matute (University of Pennsylvania)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Sound has always been there. However, its ephemeral condition has prevented us from critically listening to the past and even from thinking about our everyday sonic experiences. Moreover, the sonic materialization of the Logos —voice—  has been systematically relegated to a second level, even when orality was present in the production of any kind of text.

Sterne, liberature, and the contemporary novel

updated: 
Monday, June 19, 2017 - 10:00am
International Laurence Sterne Foundation, Kazimierz Wielki University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 5, 2017

At the 2nd International Laurence Sterne Foundation Conference (26-28 October, Bydgoszcz, Poland) Dr Katarzyna Bazarnik will be convening the panel "Sterne, liberature, and the contemporary novel", addressing the multifaceted imprint of Sterne on the contemporary novelistic discourse.

Paper proposals should be sent to k.bazarnik@uj.edu.pl and j.lipski@ukw.edu.pl; the deadline is 5 July 2017.

To read more on the conference, please go to www.sterne2017.pl

Open CFP/New Journal -- Intraspection

updated: 
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 12:24pm
Intraspection
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Intraspection, a new journal of rhetoric, culture, and style, is accepting submissions for its open-themed inaugural issue in 2018. To submit, go to http://intraspection.org and click on Submissions for guidelines. 

Digital English: A Handbook for the 21st Century Classroom

updated: 
Wednesday, June 14, 2017 - 10:53am
University of Tasmania
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

CFP: Digital English: A Handbook for the 21st Century Classroom

Edited by Naomi Milthorpe, Robert Clarke, Joanne Jones, and Robbie Moore.

Submissions due: September 1, 2017.

 

New university students are digital natives; our classrooms filled with technology. Our students are increasingly online only – distanced by the demands of economics, geography, or time. Yet as English scholars, most of our training has been with physical materials and face-to-face methods: books, paper, discussion. So what are the best methods of using technology in our classrooms? How, why, and when should we use it?

NeMLA 2018 session: College as Imagined World for First-Generation Students

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 7:58pm
Scott DeShong, Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Papers addressing the difficulties of students for whom academia is foreign, considered in terms of the student’s alienation, psychological unpreparedness, underdeveloped perspective, etc. How can such students be incorporated into academia, and thereby into work (and life broadly) made accessible by education? Alternatively, should we seek such incorporation, or instead reimagine and change academia, and how? Institutions have implemented a variety of assimilation and retention strategies, some with better records than others. Some programs engage students individually, whereas others emphasize building communities; some strategies focus on key first-year courses, such as introductory writing.

LACC 2017: “Writing in the 21st Century and Beyond: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to College Writing”

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:08pm
Louisiana Association of College Composition
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 9, 2017

LACC 2017: “Writing in the 21st Century and Beyond: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to College Writing”

The Louisiana Association of College Composition Conference 2017 is scheduled for Friday, September 29th and Saturday, September 30th, 2017 at South Louisiana Community College in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Call for Papers, Panels and Workshop Proposals / Deadline: Sept. 9th, 2017

Our Conference theme this year is “Writing in the 21st Century and Beyond: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to College Writing.”

Teaching for Tone at NeMLA 2018

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:21pm
On Teaching Tone as Well as Content at NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

In our current climate of fake news from seemingly authoritative sources, and high journalistic integrity from formerly discounted sources, it is clear that our criteria for evaluating the reliability of sources is shifting. I propose that a lack of news literacy is part of a larger literacy problem: readers need to understand tone from context and form. For as long as we have been assigning our composition or literature classes to read "A Modest Proposal" or anything else with an unreliable narrator, and as long as we have been explaining to potential book banners that a book with blatantly racist characters is not inherently racist, we language and literature instructors have been developing strategies to teach tone.

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