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rhetoric and composition

Can we read?: Literacies in the Era of Fake News

updated: 
Thursday, March 9, 2017 - 3:31pm
Melissa Schindler/ SUNY Buffalo State College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 27, 2017

Call for Participants

Modern Language Association Convention (Jan 4-7, New York City)

“Can we read?”: Literacies in the Era of Fake News

 

Note: This call is for participation in a Working Group session, which meets for two or three days and includes 8-12 participants. For more information about this session format, please visit the MLA convention website: https://www.mla.org/Convention/MLA-2018/New-Session-Formats-at-the-Convention

 

"Writing Classroom in the Trump Era" (MLA 2018)

updated: 
Thursday, March 9, 2017 - 3:31pm
Jewon Woo
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, March 25, 2017

 The new president did not show any interest in higher education until the late stage of the campaign. His pick to lead the Education Department, Betsy DeVos also does not have any background in higher education. In addition to his impulsive and popularist policies that horrify experts, his connivance of white supremacy and anti-intellectualism especially put academe in jeopardy. We have already witnessed unpromising changes on campuses in the U.S. since his appearance for the election. Racial and religious minority groups became targets of hate-motivated incidents. White-supremacist posters and fliers, swastikas, and racial epithets, which were once believed as taboo, cause constant controversies on campus.

CFP for Collection on Undocumented Youth

updated: 
Thursday, March 2, 2017 - 10:56am
Genevieve Garcia de Mueller (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley), Rubén Casas (California State University, Fresno), and Ana Milena Ribero (Oregon State University)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

 

Student Engagement across the Disciplines

updated: 
Thursday, March 2, 2017 - 10:58am
The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

The current buzz word in academic circles is “student engagement.” Faculty are expected to engage in it, but many of us struggle to match our classroom practices with gridded and numbered administrative standards. How does your institution describe, define, view, practice, or measure student engagement? What are the goals set forth administratively and in the classroom? How do you strive to meet those expectations? And how does it matter to your college, to your administrators, to you, and to your students?

Bridging Cultural Divides through Integrative Learning

updated: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 2:04pm
Terry Novak/Atlantic Center for Learning Communities
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 2, 2017

The 17th annual Atlantic Center for Learning Communities (ACLC) Curriculum Planning Retreat* will be held October 18-20, 2017, at Holy Family Passionist Retreat Center in West Hartford, CT.** We are seeking proposals for workshops that fall within the general theme of “Bridging Cultural Divides through Integrative Learning.” How do practitioners of learning communities consciously address and actively seek to help bridge political, economic, racial, ethnic, gender, religious and other “divides”? What successes and challenges do we face when encountering such divides in our learning communities? How do faculty, staff and administrators model community that is committed to bridging such divides?

To Be of Use: The Challenges and Rewards of Writing Center Work

updated: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 2:05pm
Department of English & Writing, Houghton College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 17, 2017

Writing Center directors and consultants, including student tutors, are welcome to join us on Saturday, April 22, 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., as presenters or attenders of this research- and experienced-based conference.

In her poem "To Be of Use," Marge Piercy simultaneously acknowledges the commonness and affirms the importance of “work that is real.”  With this poem in mind, numerous questions about the work of our Centers can be entertained, including but not limited to these:

--Who uses our Centers, and why?  Alternatively, who doesn't use our Centers, and why not?  To what extent is data collection helpful here, yielding what observations and resulting in what changes?

Journal of European Popular Culture - forthcoming volumes

updated: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 2:05pm
Journal of European Popular Culture (JEPC)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Journal of European Popular Culture (JEPC)

This peer-reviewed journal seeks lively submissions on all aspects of European cultural and creative activity.

At present we're looking ahead to Volume 9 (2018), two issues, but early submission is also encouraged with a consideration to remaining spaces in Volume 8

The journal is interested in contemporary practices, but also in historical, contextual, biographical or theoretical analyses relating to past cultural activities in Europe.

Papers or exploratory critical or creative pieces relating to European media, literature and the writing arts, film, music, new media, art and design, architecture, drama and dance or fine art are all very welcome.

Book chapter submissions on Affect Theory and Rhetorical Persuasion in Mass Comm

updated: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 2:11pm
Lei Zhang/University of Wisconsin, La Crosse
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 30, 2017

We are soliciting book chapter proposals for a book on the theme of affect theory and rhetorical persuasion in mass communication. An editor at Routledge is interested in reviewing a detailed book proposal.

Writing Across the Curriculum at MMLA

updated: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - 2:12pm
Alissa Burger
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, April 5, 2017

At its most basic, Writing Across the Curriculum is founded on the core belief summarized by Chris Anson in The WAC Casebook that “writing belongs in all courses in every discipline” (ix).  While guided by this central value, WAC programs must also be inherently flexible, individually designed to best meet the needs of their specific students, faculty, programs, and institutions. This diversity of possible approaches gives us the opportunity to share ideas, techniques, and experiences to explore the flexibility and adaptability of the larger WAC pedagogy.

The Writing Across the Curriculum section welcomes all submissions. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

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