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rhetoric and composition

CFP: Revisiting Commenting: Genre, Knowledge Transfer, and the Work of Composition (4/25/2009; CCCC 2010, 3/17/10-3/20/10)

updated: 
Saturday, April 18, 2009 - 1:43am
CCCC 2010

The invitation to "revisit, rethink, revise, renew" in the 2010 CCCC Call for Proposals suggests the important work done when Composition was a young field and scholars such as Richard Braddock and Mina Shaughnessy revisited common wisdom about the teaching, learning and practices of writing; their revisitations allowed them to rethink seeming truths and prompted the field to revise our understandings of error, of the thesis, of the teacher's role in the classroom. This panel proposal undertakes a project in the spirit of these earlier revisitations. Specifically, I am seeking papers that revisit and rethink the intersection of commenting and genre in our freshman writing classes in order to renew our conversations about the work of Composition.

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics" Graduate Conference and Event

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 11:46am
James B. Carter/ University of Texas at El Paso

CFP: El Paso in the Comics II: "The Southwest in the Comics"

Graduate students in all fields of study are invited to submit 200-word abstracts to the second-annual "El Paso in the Comics" conference and event, to be held on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso, February 23, 2010.

Papers on all aspects of comics scholarship, theory, and pedagogy will be given attention, but those that deal with issues related to artists, creators, characters and/or themes associated with the American Southwest and/or Hispanic/Chicano culture in comics will be given top priority.

CCCC Panel - Wikis and composition

updated: 
Friday, April 17, 2009 - 7:54am
Kerry Dirk/Virginia Tech

Wikis are becoming increasingly common as pedagogical tools in composition classrooms, as the nature of a wiki allows for easy collaboration among students and increased communication beyond the face-to-face classroom.

I'm hoping to put together a CCCC panel that questions and/or explores commonly held assumptions or beliefs about the wiki. Proposals might also explore how elements found in the traditional classroom change when moved to a wiki.

For example:

- How does the collaborative nature of a wiki change writing?

- Is the wiki truly more democratic than a face-to-face classroom?

- What is the relationship between students and teachers when using a wiki?

- How does the level of engagement change?

UPDATE

updated: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 12:30pm
Journal Issue: Professional Studies Review

The deadline for submission of articles to the next issue of Professional Studies Review has been extended to May 15. Please see the CFP in the upenn archive for further information or contact Joseph Marotta at marottaj@stjohns.edu

Cultures of Recession Graduate Conference [Nov. 20& 21, 2009]

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 10:17am
Program in Literature, Duke University


Cultures of Recession
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Hosted by The Program in Literature, Duke University
November 20 & 21, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Stanley Aronowitz (CUNY), author of How Class Works and Just Around The Corner: The Paradox of a Jobless Recovery

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

Speaking of Grief: Death and Language in Modernism (MSA 11, 5-8 November 2009, Montréal, Québec, Canada)

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 10:00pm
Daniel Moore (Queen's University, Canada)

If the Holocaust motivated aesthetic theorists and writers to rethink the premise of the literary mode altogether, stated in one form by Theodore Adorno in his 1951 claim that to write "poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," early-twentieth-century writers tended to respond to the most violent and rife deaths of their time by zeroing in on words themselves. We may find the most prominent meeting of fatality and diction in the modernist period in attacks on languages of militarism and commemoration launched from a host of quarters, in particular by ex-servicemen following the Great War.

Literacy Narrative(s) and Human Dignity; Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC / 4Cs); Deadline 4/22

updated: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009 - 4:53pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University


This panel submission to the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) will examine literacy narratives (broadly defined) that show a link between human dignity and the acquisition or practice of literacy (reading or writing), or the influence of literacy on interpersonal communication and relationships. In particular, we are interested in

*Links (positive or negative) between literacy (the ability to read and/or write) and human dignity

*Portrayals in narrative fiction or creative nonfiction of the acts of reading and writing as a means to understanding of human dignity

*Literate techniques of interaction ("reading" others' actions or personalities) as a means of humanizing or dehumanizing the Other

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