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rhetoric and composition

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] Speaker Update/Deadline Extension

updated: 
Sunday, December 21, 2008 - 3:13am
Daniel V Facchinetti

"Bodies in Motion"
The University of Rhode Island’s Third Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate
Conference
Saturday, March 28th, 2009
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Stuart Pimm, Professor of Conservation Ecology, Duke
University
Extended Submission Deadline: Sunday, February 1, 2009

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] DEADLINE EXTENDED: The Machine in the Garden 2.0

updated: 
Wednesday, December 17, 2008 - 4:57am
Lindsay Cobb

NINTH ANNUAL EGSA CONFERENCE
"THE MACHINE IN THE GARDEN 2.0"
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
January 30, 2009 ● 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Barnhardt Student Activity Center (SAC) ● 3rd Floor Salons

. . . So many inventions have been added that life seems almost made over
new . . .
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] Waiting Time

updated: 
Friday, December 12, 2008 - 10:38pm
The Comparative Literature Department at NYU

Waiting Time
New York University
Department of Comparative Literature
Graduate Student Conference
April 16-19, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Marshall Berman

Waiting Time

What are we waiting for? What awaits us? While often dismissed as a period of wastefulness or
lost time, waiting may also intensify experience and become a condition in which to consider
questions of modernity, aesthetic process, politics, erotics and the tempos of everyday life.

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] Deadline Extended - Philosophy as Advanced Composition

updated: 
Thursday, December 11, 2008 - 8:49pm
Justin Hayes

UPDATE: A recent cancelation has opened a space on the NEMLA panel
below. Please submit abstracts by SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14 at MIDNIGHT.

Philosophy as Advanced Composition

40th Anniversary Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association
(NeMLA)
Feb. 26-March 1, 2009
Hyatt Regency - Boston, Massachusetts

CFP: [Rhetoric-Composition] Waiting Time, A conference at New York University

updated: 
Wednesday, December 10, 2008 - 4:39pm
Comparative Literature Department at NYU

Waiting Time
New York University
Department of Comparative Literature
Graduate Student Conference
April 17-19, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Marshall Berman

Waiting Time

What are we waiting for? What awaits us? While often dismissed as a period of wastefulness or
lost time, waiting may also intensify experience and become a condition in which to consider
questions of modernity, aesthetic process, politics, erotics and the tempos of everyday life.

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] The Machine in the Garden 2.0

updated: 
Friday, December 5, 2008 - 5:09am
Lindsay Cobb

NINTH ANNUAL EGSA CONFERENCE
"THE MACHINE IN THE GARDEN 2.0"
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
January 30, 2009 ● 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Barnhardt Student Activity Center (SAC) ● 3rd Floor Salons

. . . So many inventions have been added that life seems almost made over
new . . .
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

UPDATE: [Rhetoric-Composition] The Machine in the Garden 2.0

updated: 
Friday, December 5, 2008 - 5:09am
Lindsay Cobb

NINTH ANNUAL EGSA CONFERENCE
"THE MACHINE IN THE GARDEN 2.0"
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
January 30, 2009 ● 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Barnhardt Student Activity Center (SAC) ● 3rd Floor Salons

. . . So many inventions have been added that life seems almost made over
new . . .
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

CFP: [Rhetoric-Composition] Writing as Exploration and Discovery

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 3:41am
Vincent Walsh

In this paper I describe a novel form of writing pedagogy that encourages
students to select their own topics for papers based on course readings
and class discussion. The purpose behind this approach is to facilitate a
process by which students are enabled to engage in a personal way with
their writing, in effect, to "own" their own writing process. Too often,
students write for the professor, responding to prompts or assigned
topics, assuming that what they produce has to be "what the professor
wants to hear." In effect, they become alientated from what they write,
trying to conform to a standard of evaluation that is outside themselves.
Since students will be doing a great deal of writing beyond

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