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Igniting the Canon: (De)Constructing What Makes Reading ‘Great’ in the Classroom and Beyond

updated: 
Thursday, December 6, 2018 - 3:20pm
Pennsylvania College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

The 2019 Pennsylvania College English Association's Annual Conference

 

Bloomsburg University

Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Thursday, May 23-Friday, May 24, 2019

 

SUBMISSIONS DUE: JANUARY 31, 2019

 

 

The Pennsylvania College English Association invites proposals for its 2019 annual conference on the theme of canonical literature, creative writing, and pedagogy.

​“Great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood.”

–John Green

Conference Call for Papers

Special Session: Transatlantic Romanticism

updated: 
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 7:57am
Transatlantic Studies Association 2019 conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 20, 2019

Proposals are welcome for 20-minute papers on any aspect of Romanticism in transatlantic context. Possible topics might include (but are not limited to) comparative romanticisms, ecological romanticisms, romantic natural histories, romantic travel and exploration, romanticism and colonialism, romanticism and critical theory. Please send a 300-word abstract, 100-word author biography, and 2-page CV to Kevin Hutchings, University Research Chair, Department of English, University of Northern British Columbia (kevin.hutchings@unbc.ca) by January 20, 2019. The conference will take place July 8-10, 2019, at the University of Lancaster, UK.

Gothic Terror, Gothic Horror: 15th International Gothic Association Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 1:51pm
Dr. Jamil Mustafa / Lewis University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, July 30 - August 2, 2019

With a focus at once sharp and wide, Gothic Terror, Gothic Horror will stimulate an eclectic and inclusive conversation about the essence of the Gothic.

We invite the submission of abstracts that explore the conference theme. We welcome proposed panels of three related papers. Since this IGA conference is the first to be held in the United States, we encourage proposals that consider the theme in relation to the American Gothic.

Graduate Conference: Technology and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 1:46pm
Boston University Department of Romance Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 1, 2018

 

TECHNOLOGY AND LITERATURE

 

Boston University Romance Studies Graduate Student Conference

 

Saturday, April 27th, 2019

 

Call for Papers

 

The Matter of the Elgin Marbles: Romantic Materiality

updated: 
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 3:10pm
North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR Conference 2019)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 25, 2019

Chair and Organizer: Dewey W. Hall (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)

 

The Parthenon Sculptures have long been a source of disparagement and fascination, especially since their arrival in London as early as 1803. Prior to that year, Thomas Bruce, seventh Earl of Elgin, procured a collection now housed in the British Museum as the Elgin Marbles, intensifying a transformation in which materiality of the marbles has been infused with seemingly vital force through an after-life of aesthetic representation. Whether through drawings, paintings, or poetry, the Elgin Marbles as objects have animated their subjects—pensive in gaze—to motivate, in effect, proliferation through aesthetic production.

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE: “Perspectives on Eighteenth-Century Theater and Performance" (SCSECS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 8:38am
Ashley Bender / South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

This panel seeks proposals on theater and performance of the long eighteenth-century, especially those that address the theme of perspective. Essays might consider the way that perspective functioned thematically in plays and other public performances, such as opera, dance, and music, and the ways that perspective (e.g., perspective scenery) affected the material conditions of performance. What perspectives did eighteenth-century audiences have on theater and performance? How did these perspectives in the public discourse shape the drama and performances of the period, and how was eighteenth-century society shaped by these cultural institutions?

EXTENDED DEADLINE: SCSECS 2019

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 9:00am
South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 14, 2018

The paper submission deadline for SCSECS 2019 has been extended to Friday, December 14. A full list of panels can be found at scsecs.net. Please submit abstracts directly to the panel chair. If you don't see a panel that fits your paper idea, you can submit a proposal to conference co-organizer Ashley Bender at abender@twu.edu

Jane Austen Upside Down

updated: 
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 8:31am
Lisa Hopkins
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

JANE AUSTEN UPSIDE DOWN

A special issue of Persuasions On-Line

Hidden Gems from Fleet Street: New Perspectives on Non-Canonical and Popular Eighteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:17pm
South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 29, 2018

Beginning with the pamphlet wars during the Restoration and ending with authors serving as critics to one anothers’ writings in the Romantic period, the eighteenth century was rife was debates about how to define and identify good literature. Authors such as John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Thomas Gray, William Wordsworth, and many others served as adjudicators of good literature by chastising others’ work in their prefaces, poetry, pamphlets, and mock epics. Theater history and book history however, tells us that some of the works of these dunces were widely popular and important in their own right—regardless of how derided they were by their peers.

The Brontes and their Contemporaries: Texts and Contexts (1816-1855)

updated: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:31pm
Jadavpur University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 18, 2018

This year (2018) the Bronte Society, centres of Victorian Studies as well as Literature departments across the Anglophone world are commemorating the bicentenary of Emily Bronte's birth with several conferences and events. The three Bronte sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne, were born in Yorkshire between 1816 and 1820. They all died young, with the longest survivor, Charlotte, passing away in 1855, possibly from tuberculosis (like her sisters) or typhus. However, in their short literary life, the sisters published one volume of poetry and seven novels – many of them as the Bells – which have ensured their presence and influence in the English literary sphere to this day.

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