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The Lyric Self and Courtly Traditions

updated: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019 - 11:38pm
American Comparative Literature Association ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2019

A new preference for the production and consumption of lyric forms of poetry, over that of more narrative options like the epic, often coincided with a governing body’s establishment of courtly norms and practices. This trend is consistent across a multitude of seemingly disparate cultures. The popularity and refinement of the ghazal during the Ghaznavid dynasty and the sonnet at the Elizabethan court are just two examples of similar formal developments arising within different cultural contexts. Shorter lyrics were often formally rigorous, but also highly customizable, and many of these forms also called for a new emphasis on the construction and expression of self.

“I’m First”: First-Generation Graduate Students and Mentors (Roundtable)

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:42pm
American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

A large number of graduate students are first-generation. This session seeks to cultivate a discussion about common questions, concerns, and advice for graduate students and postdocs as they navigate academia. However, this isn’t designed only for students, but it also aims to provide mentors with advice on how to better support students’ success and retention rates. This roundtable is intended to create a space in which seasoned professionals and early career scholars can share tips and ideas for first-generation graduate students, describe mentoring experiences, and foster mentorship relationships.

"Are You Game?", issue n°9 of Angles

updated: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019 - 3:40pm
SAES
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

“Are you game?”

 

 

For an upcoming issue of Angles: New Perspectives on the Anglophone World, a peer-reviewed journal indexed by MLA, ERIH-Plus, EBSCO and others, we welcome proposals on “Are you game?”

This issue will be guest edited by Gilles Bertheau (gilles.bertheau@univ-tours.fr).

 

 

Call for papers

 

Byron Society of America at College English Association

updated: 
Friday, August 23, 2019 - 7:43am
Byron Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Call for Papers

Byron Society of America at CEA 2020

March 26-28, 2020 | Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

Hilton Head Marriott Resort and Spa

The Byron Society of America and the College English Association welcome proposals for presentations on Lord Byron's life, works, and/or influences for the 51st annual CEA conference, the theme of which is Tides.

 

Nineteenth-Century Formations

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:18pm
University of Hong Kong
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Nineteenth-Century Formations

The University of Hong Kong

December 6-7

 

This interdisciplinary conference asks participants to rethink the nineteenth century and its social, aesthetic, and discursive formations. It brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to consider the categories that inform and shape our various disciplinary approaches to the nineteenth century. In doing so, it invokes the term “formations” in a broad sense, to convey the processes by which concepts, categories, structures, systems, and institutions—many of which remain in place today—came into existence during this period.

 

REMINDER: The Gothic, Then and Now (Panel at ASECS Annual Conference, March 19-21, 2020, St. Louis, MO)

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 11:16am
Geremy Carnes, Lindenwood University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

This session seeks papers that bridge discussions of eighteenth-century Gothic literature with discussions of the Gothic’s role in contemporary literature and culture. Questions explored may include (but are not limited to) the following: What does the eighteenth-century Gothic tell us about our own contemporary Gothic moment? Can studies of the contemporary Gothic shed new light on our understanding of the Gothic's eighteenth-century origins? Are we guilty of dehistoricization if we apply the term “Gothic” to contemporary uncanny or scary texts?

The Gothic Panel II at PAMLA 2019 (Extended)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:55pm
Tanner Sebastian, The University of Nevada, Reno
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

We are looking for one or two more presenters to join the second Gothic Panel at PAMLA.

We invite proposals for papers dealing with Gothic literature, culture, and film. This session welcomes proposals on a wide variety of topics, with particular consideration granted to papers that explore gothic children's literature or that engage with the 2019 conference theme of "Send In the Clowns." Possible foci might include adaptations, audience/reception studies, children's gothic, and emotional portrayals in relation to the Gothic.

Conference Information:

November 14-17, 2019

Wyndham San Diego Bayside, San Diego, CA

BEETHOVEN THE EUROPEAN

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:51pm
Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, July 16, 2019

https://www.luigiboccherini.org/2019/05/22/beethoven-the-european/   BEETHOVEN THE EUROPEANLUCCA, Complesso Monumentale di San Micheletto27-29 March 2020 Keynote Speakers:• Barry Cooper (University of Manchester)• William Kinderman (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)  Beethoven’s impact is widely recognised as of seemingly universal, timeless significance; 250 years since his birth his music still communicates with and inspires people across the globe. Nevertheless his iconic, enduring oeuvre stems from a specific European cultural milieu and historical context.

Technology and 19th-C. British Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 12:35am
Brian Cowlishaw/Northeastern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Call for Papers: Subject--Technology and 19th-C. British Literature

 

Seeking contributors for a book of essays that explore connections between technology and nineteenth-century British literature. To be published by McFarland Press, a leading publisher of academic books. (See: https://mcfarlandbooks.com/) Essays should be of interest to, and readable by, both scholars and non-academics.

Suggested topics include:

*The effects of technology on nineteenth-century British literature.

*Portrayals/rhetoric regarding technology in nineteenth-century British literature.

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