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Nineteenth-century Women Writers Reviewed

updated: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 1:51pm
Nineteenth-century Women Writers Reviewed

Nineteenth-century Women Writers Reviewed invites applications for editorial board members.

NCWWR is a digital documentary edition, dedicated to recovering the 'lost' critical reception of women writers in the 19C. NCWWR collects artifacts of women writers published from 1789-1900 appearing in British and American periodicals: these artifacts include reviews, extracts of prose and poetry, tributes, advertisements, notices of publication, and references. Then, using an Omeka database, our editorial team transcribes, edits, annotates and codes these artifacts in TEI/XML. NCWWR expands on Romantic Women Writers Reviewed, a 9-volume print series published between 2011-13 by Pickering and Chatto.

Identity Across the Curriculum

updated: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 2:50am
Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement

Undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to submit presentations for a conference that explores, challenges, and re-imagines the concept of identity.

This conference will allow students to present on a variety of issues and themes related to identity. Identity, in this context, can refer to an individual or group and comprises various registers—including race, ethnicity, gender, sex, sexuality, nationality, ability, religion, political affiliation, etc. Also, identity can be explored in multiplicity: considering how certain identities impact others.

SAMLA 2015: Poet-Artist Collaborations (Durham, NC, November 13-15)

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 1:58pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

This panel explores SAMLA 87's theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations found in book arts, broadside printings, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century - due date June 3 2015

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 12:15pm
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs. Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.

[UPDATE] LITERARY LONDON ANNUAL CONFERENCE 22-24 July 2015 DEADLINE EXTENDED to 31st MARCH

updated: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 9:05am
The Literary London Society

22–24 July 2015
Conference Theme: 'London in Love'
Hosted by the Institute of English Studies, University of London

Confirmed Plenary Speakers:
Imtiaz Dharker (poet, artist and documentary film-maker)
Dr. Gregory Dart (University College London)
Professor Kate Flint (University of Southern California)

[UPDATE] CFP MLA 2016 (Austin, 01/07-01/10) Early Modern English Catholicism in Literature

updated: 
Sunday, March 8, 2015 - 6:57pm
Geremy Carnes

Topics may include English Catholic writers, anti-Catholic or pro-Catholic poetry or literary prose, or representations of English Catholics or Catholicism in literary texts. Proposals for papers that focus on these topics in later early modernity (the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries) are particularly encouraged. 250-300 word abstracts by 15 March 2015.

Chapter Proposals for "Literature and Ecofeminism"; April 1, 2015 Deadline

updated: 
Sunday, March 8, 2015 - 6:11pm
D. A. Vakoch / California Institute of Integral Studies

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited volume on ecofeminist literary criticism titled Literature and Ecofeminism. Contributions covering a range of literary forms from diverse cultures and national traditions are welcome. Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract, 200-word biography, and sample of a previously published chapter or article to dvakoch@ciis.edu by April 1, 2015. Proposers will be notified about whether their submissions are accepted for the book by April 15, 2015. For accepted proposals first drafts of full chapters (8,000 – 9,000 words) are due by September 1, 2015, and final versions are due November 1, 2015.

Poet-Artist Collaborations (abstracts due May 15)

updated: 
Saturday, March 7, 2015 - 10:15am
SAMLA, November 13-15, 2015; Durham, NC

This panel explores SAMLA 87's theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations found in book arts, broadside printings, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

REIMAGINING MARGINALITY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

updated: 
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 2:58pm
Cameroon English Language and Literature Association - CELLA

The pluralistic, sophisticated and technocrazy nature of contemporary existence has blurred concepts like marginality and minority that are inherent in human existence. Because technology seems to have melted several existential boundaries, and because theories of global citizenry give the impression of free access to movement, the sense of being marginal is almost waning. However, the network of global philosophy and technological connectivity are themselves apparent mechanisms of marginalization especially in the postcolonial context. Postcolonial theorists, intellectuals and writers have taken the intellectual, political and moral authority to challenge representational claims made by dominant Western/imperial cultures.

ASLE Panel at MMLA 2015

updated: 
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 11:20am
Midwest Modern Language Association

Just over a decade ago, Dana Phillips (in)famously attacked ecocritics for uncritically borrowing terms and ideas from the discipline of ecology, which, he argued, is itself a "less than fully coherent field with a very checked past and fairly uncertain future" (45). While controversial, Phillips's critique sparked important discussions about ecocriticism's methodology, especially its claim to interdisciplinarity. So-called "second wave" ecocritics reexamined the field's founding assumptions; a period of self-assessment propelled ecocriticism toward a more rigorous engagement with the sciences as well as the humanities.

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