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ACLA 2016 Seminar on Poetry and Forgiveness

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 1:27pm
Thomas Berenato

Please consider proposing a paper to the ACLA 2016 seminar on poetry and forgiveness.

See details below and at http://www.acla.org/seminar/poetry-and-forgiveness.

Seminar: Poetry and Forgiveness

Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association

Harvard U., Cambridge, MA, 17-20 March, 2016

Abstracts due 23 September, midnight PST; submit through the ACLA online portal: http://www.acla.org/node/add/paper.

Serial Forms (ACLA Seminar)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 11:58am
ACLA 2016

In response to an echoing call for a renewed attention to form, this ACLA seminar will examine a particularly rich formal classification: the serial. Conceiving of serial form broadly to encompass a variety of sequential and collected narratives, from installments and episodes to versions, revisions, witnesses, releases, copies, variations, collections, and cycles, we will ask how narratives in parts challenge and invigorate our critical approaches to narrative form. While criticism of serial form tends to center on Charles Dickens and look forward to twentieth-century radio and television, the formal conventions of seriality – the sequence and collection of narratives – extends far beyond this fictional field.

[UPDATE] Fictional Economies: Inequality and Novel, Essay collection with forward by Rami Shamir, author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:44am
Joseph Donica/Bronx Community College, CUNY

Fictional Economies: Inequality and the Novel

Joseph Donica is an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College.

Rami Shamir is the author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE (Grove Press 2011, http://traintopokipse.com/)

Abstracts of 300 words and full CVs due November 1, 2015 to
fictionaleconomies@gmail.com
Full articles due March 1, 2015
Projected publication fall 2016

Craft Critique Culture: Bridging Divides (April 8-9, 2016: Iowa City, Iowa)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:47pm
Kate Nesbit / Lydia Maunz-Breese / Heidi Renée Aijala (University of Iowa)

16th Annual Craft Critique Culture Graduate Conference
April 8-9, 2016
Bridging Divides
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the intersections of critical and creative approaches to writing both within and beyond the academy. This year's conference will encourage an examination of the "inter" of interdisciplinary—as well as the construction and deconstruction of boundaries between and within academic, public, private, personal, critical, and creative discourses—through an inquiry into bridging divides.

[UPDATE] NEMLA 2016 Panel Still Laughing: Ancient Comedy and Its Descendants Due 9/30

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 2:31pm
Claire Sommers (the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Barry Spence (University of Massachusetts)

Aristotle in his Poetics outlines his theory of tragedy and gives readers a framework for assessing and understanding the genre; his treatise providing the equivalent analysis of comedy has sadly been lost, and as a result, it is difficult to find a unified theory of ancient comedy. Perhaps the closest we have is Democritus' statement that "Laughter is a complete conception of the world." Centuries later, Bakhtin would elaborate upon this sentiment by claiming that the carnivalesque comedy allows for dialogue between multiple genres and voices in order to create a world in which societal structures are upended.

[UPDATE] The Digital Nineteenth-Century Narrative, NeMLA 2016, Abstracts due SEPT. 30

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 1:55pm
Bryn Gravitt, Tufts University

In recent years, the web has seen an explosion of digital interpretations of nineteenth-century texts. The Lizzie Bennett Diaries web series translates Elizabeth from Pride and Prejudice, via video diary, into an out-of-work grad student living with her family; "Texts From Jane Eyre" imagines how Jane would interact with Rochester and St. John via text message; David Copperfield has his own Facebook page; and there are at least four video games based on Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This session combines interests in nineteenth century, digital media, and cultural studies to investigate how we understand our current world through the lens of nineteenth-century characters and stories.

ACLA 2016: A Sense of Unease: The Materiality of Horror

updated: 
Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 11:27am
Thomas Stuart (UWO), Riley McDonald (UWO) / ACLA

The terms "terror" and "horror" as defined by gothic novelist Ann Radcliffe, are diametrically opposed: while the former "expands the soul and awakens the faculties to a high degree of life," the latter "freezes and nearly annihilates them" ("Supernatural" 150). This distinction subordinates horror's focus on the material - the visceral, the abject - to the intellectual stimulation provided by terror. Blood, guts, and the grotesque are the norms of horror and while gothic fiction anxiously stages the destruction of the human body, this panel is interested in how sensual apprehension constructs the body.

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