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ACLA 2016: A Sense of Unease: The Materiality of Horror

updated: 
Sunday, September 6, 2015 - 11:27am
Thomas Stuart (UWO), Riley McDonald (UWO) / ACLA

The terms "terror" and "horror" as defined by gothic novelist Ann Radcliffe, are diametrically opposed: while the former "expands the soul and awakens the faculties to a high degree of life," the latter "freezes and nearly annihilates them" ("Supernatural" 150). This distinction subordinates horror's focus on the material - the visceral, the abject - to the intellectual stimulation provided by terror. Blood, guts, and the grotesque are the norms of horror and while gothic fiction anxiously stages the destruction of the human body, this panel is interested in how sensual apprehension constructs the body.

Gothic Routes: Travel Writing and the Gothic

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 - 11:12am
American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies

"Gothic Routes: Travel Writing and the Gothic"

ASECS in Pittsburgh, March 31-April 3rd, 2016

This panel will focus on the connections between travel writing as a genre and the uses of, representations about, and innovative connections between it and conventions of the gothic. Themes and topics may include: narrative relationships between the gothic and travel narratives, gender and travel writing/gothic tropes, empire and the gothic/travel narratives, exploration and the gothic, finding the "other" and the narrative of travel writing and the gothic.

Please send abstract to M. Soledad Caballero, Associate Professor of English, scaballe@allegheny.edu, by Sept. 15, 2015

[UPDATE] Call for submissions: Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 - 6:43am
Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics



The editors invite contributions to Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to pursuing fundamental questions on the forms and functions of the symbolic. Symbolism publishes high-profile research on topics related to the use of figurative language, thought and signification in artistic expression and representation. While maintaining a strong literary focus, the annual also inquires into practices of the symbolic across discourses in media ranging from the cinema and painting to opera, sculpture and other arts.

[UPDATE] Call for submissions: Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2015 - 6:37am
Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics

The editors invite contributions to Symbolism. An International Annual of Critical Aesthetics, an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to pursuing fundamental questions on the forms and functions of the symbolic. Symbolism publishes high-profile research on topics related to the use of figurative language, thought and signification in artistic expression and representation. While maintaining a strong literary focus, the annual also inquires into practices of the symbolic across discourses in media ranging from the cinema and painting to opera, sculpture and other arts.

Teaching 18th-century British Literature: Interdisciplinary Approaches

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 2:10pm
Tonya J. Moutray / NEMLA 2016

This roundtable explores interdisciplinary methods of approaching the teaching of 18th-century British and Anglophone literature, including Restoration and Romantic literatures. Participants will share innovative pedagogical approaches and teaching strategies that bring students more fully into the literary, artistic, cultural, and historical worlds of these time periods. Discussion of the use of experiential and/or multimodal approaches in and outside of the classroom is particularly welcome. Abstracts should include a title and be no more than 300 words. Please submit abstracts through the nemla website at http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla.html no later than Sep.

Feminist Pedagogy: Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:10pm
Kathleen Alves/CUNY

Feminist Pedagogy in the Two-Year College

How do two-year college instructors put feminist theory into pedagogical practice? This roundtable discusses forms of feminist pedagogy in the community college classroom. Participants are invited to share methods and ideas of pedagogy for teaching in women and gender studies and/or feminist approaches to learning and classroom strategies across the disciplines. Papers should aim to address gender and sexuality issues, along with race and class, within and outside the rapidly transforming academic space of the two-year college.

Literary (De)Formations

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:16pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

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