Subscribe to RSS - romantic

romantic

[UPDATE] Ruth Rendell: Special Issue of Contemporary Women's Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 8:11am
Falmouth University

Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

Hartford and Antebellum American Writing

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:36am
NEMLA: 3/17-3/20, 2016

The reputations of Hartford, Connecticut, residents Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain overshadow the city's antebellum authors. NeMLA 2016 seems ideally situated for a session to raise the academic appreciation and profile of earlier writers who contributed to Hartford's historical literary legacy, which includes Lydia Sigourney, Ann Plato, abolitionist ministers like Lyman Beecher and Amos G. Beman, and Hartford-born pamphlet writer Maria Stewart. Hartford was also a publishing center with a young Samuel G. Goodrich and later, Lewis Skinner, who printed Rev. James C. Pennington's book about African and African American history; lexicographer-journalist Noah Webster was of West Hartford, and The Charter Oak, was Hartford's anti-slavery newspaper.

ASECS 2016: Transnational Exchanges: Gender and Embodiment; Deadline 9/15

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:17pm
American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (ASECS) March 31-April 3, 2016

This panel seeks to explore how and why did gender, especially within the context of sexual violence, courtship and marriage, citizenship and travel, function as transnational exchange and a prism for engaging reflection on national identity and difference in travel accounts, histories and fiction? Did such reflections assume some continuity across cultures about what was meant by "woman," "man,"? How might have "love" and "family," serve as modes of exchange across cultures? Were alternative accounts of these terms, particularly in narratives describing conflicts in cultural expectations, offer opportunities for reimagining gender roles?

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.

Pages