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The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

Looking at erotic visual art from the German-speaking world

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 7:30am
Northeast Modern Language Association

NeMLA 2016 Hartford, CT (March 17-20, 2016)

Description:

This panel looks at paintings, film, graphic novels, photography, and other visual art from German-speaking countries that feature erotic themes. It describes and compares the strategies which the artists use to answer (and question) our desire for an erotic visual experience.

Abstract:
The pleasure of looking at visual art is doubled, but also troubled when it comes to the erotica genre. There, the viewer gazes at the canvas, screen, or page in search of aesthetic as well as erotic stimulation. Far from naively delivering gullible pictures, many visual artists are aware of this double desire and self-reflexively play with this knowledge.

The River: Flows of Innovation and Exchange in the Global(i)zed English World

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 4:49am
Department of English & Modern Languages, North South University

We would like to solicit abstracts, with a maximum of 300 words, for papers addressing any aspect of our theme of innovation and exchange. The deadline for submissions is October 15, 2015. Please send your abstracts to conference.deml@northsouth.edu. All accepted papers will be published in the conference proceedings. Selected papers will be published in our peer reviewed journal Panini. We will notify candidates of the status of their submission by November 30, 2015.

Fairy Tales in Society and Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 1:56pm
NEMLA

This panel session will feature the manner in which fairy tales reflect and influence values and ideals of their respective society and culture. In The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, Bruno Bettelheim emphasizes on how the fairy tale that an individual has read or listened to during childhood impacts him/her both consciously and subconsciously throughout life.

Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 10:43am
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.

[UPDATE] Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age (Journal Special Issue August 30, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 - 9:44am
PROTEUS--A Journal of Ideas

Proteus: A Journal of Ideas seeks submissions for our upcoming issue, "Privacy and Freedom in the Digital Age." We are soliciting articles and creative works from a wide range of disciplines that reflect upon the issue's theme. We are looking for broad theoretical inquiries, individual case studies, and traditional scholarly articles related to the theme. Additionally, we strongly encourage submissions of theme-related photographs, poetry, and creative writing. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Call for Book Chapters. Mater Dolorosa: The Representation of the Blessed Mary in Literature and Art

updated: 
Monday, August 3, 2015 - 6:52pm
Universitas Press

In today's complex world religious discourse is especially crucial, considering that secularism is expanding around the globe. We seek contributions on the representation of the Virgin Mary in World Literature and Art. Comparative approaches are always welcome. Religious and cultural literacy is important for domestic and international politics, the practice of peace, harmony, justice, and social prosperity. Thus, this edited volume will help diminish religious illiteracy. Universitas Press has agreed to publish this edited volume. Contributions are welcome from scholars in various disciplines in the humanities.

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