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Submission Call : The Sunflower Collective

Sunday, July 26, 2015 - 6:21am
The Sunflower Collective

The Sunflower Collective is looking for submissions. We celebrate the personal and the political - which we believe to be one and the same thing - in art.

We would like to mention at the outset that we are not interested in art that does not take risks. We do not mind if you have a degree but we are unlikely to be impressed by it. Nor do we care which journals have published your work before. All we are interested in is something that sings for itself without any props, something that grabs us by our throat and refuses to let go, something that shakes us out of our complacent stupor. Give us something hungry, not bellyful; something beat, if you get our drift.

Disability in the Visual Sphere--abstract due 9/30/15, conference 3/17-20, 2016

Friday, July 24, 2015 - 6:13pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This panel seeks to explore the category of disability as something that is perceived and performed in the visual sphere. Papers might include discussions of voyeurism, spectacles and spectatorship, self-fashioning, visual art, undetectable or ambiguous disability, the body as evidence, erasure and exposure, sensory impairment, perception and interpretation, and questions of legibility and truth. Open to scholars working in any geographical region or period.

Please submit abstracts up to 300 words with a short (1-2 sentence) bio. DO NOT EMAIL YOUR ABSTRACT. You must go through the NeMLA site:

CFP Extended Deadline

Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:09am
Semper - Seminario Permanente di Poesia di Trento

Comunichiamo che il comitato direttivo di SEMPER - Seminario permanente di poesia diretto da Pietro Taravacci e Francesco Zambon ha stabilito di prorogare di dieci giorni la deadline per l'invio di proposte per il convegno Brevitas. Percorsi estetici tra forma breve e frammento nelle letterature occidentali, che si terrà nei giorni 4-6 novembre presso l'Università di Trento.

Un breve testo di presentazione e le linee di indagine proposte possono essere consultate all'indirizzo

Diagnosis Literature: Medical Narratives of the Nineteenth Century--NEMLA 2016 Hartford

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:53pm
Amanda Caleb/Misericordia University

This panel seeks to explore how medical narrative was used in nineteenth-century fiction and medical texts as a counterargument to the medical gaze, thereby rewriting the medical history of the period from the patient's prospective. The use of medical narrative as a counter-current to the profession's paternalism indicates the subversive nature of nineteenth-century literature and reinforces the value of storytelling and narrative within the "factual" world of medicine.

Publicly Private: Cities, Literature, and the Social Contract

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:04pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This panel is part of the NeMLA 2016 Annual Convention, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, from March 17 to March 20, 2016. The focus is the ways eighteenth- and nineteenth-century urban development altered previous modes of socialization and led to a pervasive undercurrent of urban-based anxieties within literature of the period. Panelists will examine literature that engages with the ways cities and life in cities reduce private space and force people together into public spaces, requiring some level of engagement with the social contract as they interact with their fellow urbanites. Such interactions involve questions of identity and dis/honesty, and a character's ability to read his/her fellow citizens successfully.

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 12:34pm
Birkbeck, University of London

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture
30th October 2015
Birkbeck, University of London

"Though it is in the first place a faculty of individual minds, it is clear that attention has also become an acute collective problem of modern life—a cultural problem." -- Matthew B. Crawford, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction (2015)


Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:01am
Pennsylvania College English Association


The Land Has a Story

Pennsylvania College English Association (PCEA) 2015 Conference
October 1-3, 2015
Hilton Scranton and Conference Center
100 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA 18501

Keynote by Sarah Piccini, Assistant Director
Lackawanna Historical Society

The Ruin, the Future

Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 7:13pm

Transformations: CFP: Issue 28

The Ruin, the Future

Over the past few years a swathe of what has come to be known as "ruin porn" has swept the internet. Perhaps in an uncanny updating of Albert Speer's dark fantasies of "ruin value", photographs of Detroit's abandoned factories and theatres, Chernobyl's crumbling tenements and "urbex" photos of ruined asylums and hotels are gleefully traded on Facebook and Reddit and have amassed immense cultural currency.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.