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Literary (De)Formations

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:16pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Feminist Singularities [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:31am
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

Publication of 5 Edited Books with ISBN

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:50am
Professor B.Panda

Call for Papers for Edited Books with ISBN
Last Date 31st December 2015
Generally, most people have their own ideas of what literature is. When enrolling in a literary course at university, you expect that everything on the reading list will be "literature". Similarly, you might expect everything by a known author to be literature, even though the quality of that author's work may vary from publication to publication. Perhaps you get an idea just from looking at the cover design on a book whether it is "literary" or "pulp". Literature then, is a form of demarcation, however fuzzy, based on the premise that all texts are not created equal. Some have or are given more value than others.

Wordsworth Among The Naturalists – Panel for NeMLA in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 6:23pm
NeMLA

British Romanticism and American Literary Naturalism might seem an unlikely pairing. Romanticism's investment in a sublime yet beneficent natural world and the power of the individuated self contrasts starkly with Naturalism's interest in deterministic doom and urban degeneration of. Yet the relationship between the two movements is more complex than this binary allows. This panel seeks papers that consider the ways British Romanticism as practiced by poets, essayists, prose stylists and other writers of the early 19th century was repurposed in the works of late 19th and early 20th American literary naturalism.

Call for Papers by Graduate Students and Post-Graduates

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 5:56pm
Text in Context: A Graduate Student Journal published at Southern Connecticut State University

Text in Context is a graduate student and post-graduate journal published electronically by current graduate students and post-graduates of the English Department at Southern Connecticut State University.

(UPDATE) CFP: LITERATURE AND CENSORSHIP (DEADLINE, 30 SEP, 2015)

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 4:53pm
Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry Volume 2 No 2

India is one of the few countries in the world to have a film censor board. And one of its recent casualties is a lesbian film significantly titled "Unfreedom." The current government has upped the ante by extending the ban culture of censorship from the aesthetic realm to the realm of everyday consumption with the ban on beef. The ban on Jafar Panahi, the Iranian filmmaker, continues and he continues to express himself in his art form in house arrest. The recent Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris has put the limelight back on censorship.

CFP: NEMLA 2016 Hartford What does Digital Humanities Enable Today?

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 2:44pm
elif sendur/ Binghamton University

In their 1999 essay "Deformance and Interpretation," Lisa Samuels and Jerome McGann propose deformative criticism against a rigid, theoretical, informative mode of reading in humanities. Deformance is an action, an imaginative, creative poiesis that does not necessarily aim to set a meaning of a text but reimagines it as a performance. Usually perceived in opposition to the more analytical camp of Digital Humanities, deformative criticism or deformance seems to be one of the very real and material alleys that Digital Humanities has offered to the structured, institutional, and perhaps all too ossified forms of production and exposition of knowledge.

The Oswald Review: Undergraduate Literary Criticism

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 9:57am
University of South Carolina, Aiken, English Dept

The Oswald Review is a refereed undergraduate journal of criticism and research in the discipline of English. Published annually, The Oswald Review accepts submissions from undergraduates in this country and abroad (with a professor's endorsement).

Submit each manuscript as a separate email attachment in Microsoft Word. TOR discourages simultaneous submission to other journals.

All text should be provided in current MLA format, justified left only and without headers and footers. Endnotes, if absolutely necessary, should be minimal.

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