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Ashgate Studies in Childhood: 1700 to the Present (no deadline; book series)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 1:20pm
Ann Donahue, Ashgate Publishing

Series Editor: Claudia Nelson, Texas A&M University
This series recognizes and supports innovative work on the child and on
literature for children and adolescents that informs teaching and engages
with current and emerging debates in the field. Proposals are welcome for
interdisciplinary and comparative studies by humanities scholars working in
a variety of fields, including literature; book history, periodicals
history, and print culture and the sociology of texts; theater, film,
musicology, and performance studies; history, including the history of
education; gender studies; art history and visual culture; cultural studies;
and religion.

"Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:27pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

CFPanelists: "Unsettling the Slave Narrative" (C19 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 8:07pm
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

This proposed panel seeks to present new and challenging perspectives on the history of the slave narrative genre. Recent studies have sought to recontextualize and/or reconsider the generic contours of the Anglo-American slave narrative. For example, Daphne Brooks has suggested the development of a "sonic slave narrative"; Nicole Aljoe and Ian Finseth have drawn attention to the "journeys" of the form in the early Americas; Deborah Jenson has highlighted popular sources from the Haitian Revolutionary period; John MacKay has written comparatively about the autobiographical writings of American slaves and Russian serfs.

Landscaping Change: Exploring the transformation, reconstitution & disruption of environments. 29th-31st March 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 4:09pm
Bath Spa University

Landscaping Change:
Exploring the transformation, reconstitution and disruption of environments through the arts and humanities and social science.

Bath Spa University
29, 30, 31 March 2016

Sponsored by the British Academy and hosted by the Writing and the Environment Research Centre, Bath Spa University

Keynote Speakers:
Stephen Daniels, Professor of Cultural Geography, University of Nottingham
Other speakers TBC

Humanism and Its Prefixes

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 10:20am
Department of Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

Humanism and its prefixes
(non-, trans-, post-, in-, a-)

October 3rd-4th, 2015

Organized by the graduate students of UC Berkeley's Department of Rhetoric
Doe Library, University of California, Berkeley

Realism Bites - Disruptive Realisms in Modernity 08/13/2015

updated: 
Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 5:37pm
The Johns Hopkins University

Eighth Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the German Program
Department of German and Romance Languages and Literature at the Johns Hopkins University

Realism Bites
Disruptive Realisms in Modernity

Keynote speakers:
Prof. Timothy Brennan, University of Minnesota
Prof. Elisabeth Strowick, Johns Hopkins University

November 6- 7, 2015
The Johns Hopkins University

All the fissures and rents which are inherent in the historical situation must be drawn into the form-giving process and cannot nor should be disguised by compositional means.
(György Lukács, The Theory of the Novel)

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