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CFP: CSA Conference Seminars (11/25/05; CSA, 4/19/06-4/22/06)

updated: 
Friday, November 11, 2005 - 2:18pm
elizabeth conforti

The CSA conference (April 19-22, 2006) will again feature a series of
seminars. Seminars are small-group (maximum 15 individuals) discussion
sessions for which participants write brief ''position" papers that are
circulated prior to the conference. Those interested in participating in
(rather than leading) a seminar should consult the list of seminars below.

CFP: The Gothic and Its Human Others (11/30/05; ACLA, 3/23/06-3/26/06)

updated: 
Friday, November 11, 2005 - 1:47pm
Ruth Anolik

CFP: The Mysterious Unknown: The Gothic and Its Human Others
ACLA 2006 Annual Meeting: The Human and Its Others
Princeton University, March 23-26, 2006

The Mysterious Unknown: The Gothic and Its Human Others
Seminar Organizer: Ruth Bienstock Anolik, Villanova University

Conventionally, the Gothic narrative traces the encounter of the human
subject with the mysterious and horrifying supernatural, beyond human
experience. This seminar will address the tendency of the Gothic text
to replace the supernatural figure of horror with the human Other, the
person who is represented as being inhumanly horrifying. The seminar
will be divided into three sections (one for each day of the
conference):

CFP: A Cabinet of Curiosities (11/30/05; ACLA, 3/23/06-3/26/06)

updated: 
Thursday, November 3, 2005 - 5:46pm
Nhora Lucía Serrano

" A Cabinet of Curiosities: Objectifying the Human from the
Renaissance to the 21st
Century"
Panel for the 2006 American Comparative Literature Association Annual
Meeting
March 23 - 26, 2006
Princeton University
Deadline for papers: November 30, 2005

We invite papers for the seminar panel, "A Cabinet of Curiosities:
Objectifying the Human from the Renaissance to the 21st Century," as
part of the American Comparative Literature Association's (ACLA) 2006
Annual Meeting: The Human and Its Others.

CFP: Science and Sentiment in U.S. Women's Writing (12/10/05; SSAWW, 11/8/06-11/11/06)

updated: 
Saturday, October 29, 2005 - 6:49pm
Lydia Fisher

We seek papers for a panel at the 2006 Society for the Study of American
Women Writers conference (in Philadelphia) that explore the relationship
between science and sentiment in women's writing. Taking as a starting
point scholarship on sentiment by critics such as Shirley Samuels, Glenn
Hendler, Julie Ellison, Marianne Noble, Dana Nelson, and Lauren Berlant, we
are interested in how women writers' use of and relationship to the
sentimental aesthetic developed as America's scientific world view evolved,
from the age of so-called sentimental "feminization" (in the 18th and 19th
centuries) into the present moment. The language of science-as seen in

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