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science and culture

The Object as Process. Call for Essays Situating Artistic Practice (DEADLINE EXTENDED)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - 4:21am
German A. Duarte
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

Objective

As a research team devoted to artistic practice, we are motivated by the questions: How does artistic practice lead to the production of knowledge? How does, in turn, artistic knowledge relate to its material base? How does contingent materiality guide the artist towards finding form and developing a statement?

The proposed volume is consecrated to the object as a process in order to offer new insights into the ways the object (broadly construed, comprising digital and other non-classical objects) becomes an active element in artistic practice. This exploration intends to furnish a better understanding of artistic production.

Writing a Cosmos: European Literature and Popular Astronomy, 1890-1950 (CfP)

updated: 
Friday, August 30, 2019 - 8:19am
Christoph Richter
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

By the turn of the twentieth century, the ‘new astronomy’ had developed into a proper scientific discipline, with its own sets of instruments, its own journals, its own jargon, and its own interpretative authority. With the acceleration of new discoveries and insights into stellar phenomena, the emerging mass media ensured that this astronomical knowledge fascinated an even wider audience in the late 19th and early 20th century. At the same time, literature across Europe responded to the fascinating astronomical developments in a variety of modes, styles, and genres.

Stage The Future III: International Conference on Science Fiction Theatre

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 2:36pm
Dr Christos Callow Jr / Cyborphic
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Louise LePage, Lecturer in Theatre (University of York)

Following two successful conferences in the UK, at Royal Holloway, University of London and in Arizona, at Arizona State University, in 2014 and 2015 respectively, Stage the Future returns to the UK for its third conference on science fiction theatre on 6-7 December 2019. We welcome papers, panels, and performances that examine and explore the unique attributes live performance offers to science fiction and those that science fiction offers to live performance.

SEMINAR PROPOSAL: Why work? Technology, magic, and the cultural value of labor

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 12:10pm
American Comparative Literature Association 2020 Annual Meeting
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

 

CFP for seminar proposal to ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) 2020 annual meeting in Chicago (March 19-22, 2020).

Seminar Title: Why work? Technology, magic, and the cultural value of labor

Climate Change and Comparative Aesthetics

updated: 
Monday, August 26, 2019 - 10:10am
Rebecca Oh, University of Illinois
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

In 2016 Amitav Ghosh threw down a gauntlet: realism, he asserted, is not adequate to the task of representing climate change. As per the subtitle of The Great Derangement, it is “the unthinkable” both in our recent Holocene past and in the genre of realism. Shortly after, Jesse Oak Taylor called out Ghosh’s dismissal of realism on b2o’s blog while advocating other kinds of serious fiction, like modernism and magical realism, as capable of representing climate change. Most recently, Elizabeth DeLoughrey has asserted that allegory is the form par excellence for representing the Anthropocene.

Edited Collection - The Scientist in Popular Culture

updated: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 12:17pm
Rebecca Janicker, University of Portsmouth
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

From news and documentaries to TV drama and major media franchises, science has become a firm fixture in contemporary media culture. Across these diverse formats, a fascination with the perceived capacity of science – whether in the guise of medicine, criminology, space science or engineering – to transform life in wonderful and fearful ways endures. The figure of the scientist is science made manifest and, though different variants have evolved over the centuries, the scientist has remained a constant presence in Western culture. The last hundred years or so has seen many developments in science and technology and popular culture has kept abreast of these, portraying scientists that respond to the shifting hopes and fears of eager audiences.

NeMLA 2020: Literature, New Media and Perception (Panel)

updated: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019 - 11:31am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

With the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, reality no longer depended on the autonomous interpretation of the subject's view, but was instead objectively perceived and recognizable. Contrary to painting, photography fueled changes in perception and perceived reality by realistically reproducing the object as it exists. Now, the 21st century stands under the aegis of the image, a culture dominated by pictures, visual simulations, illusions, copies, and reproductions—creating an inflection point where visual paradigms compete with and even threaten traditional practices.

Race/Science/Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 9:19am
Society for the Study of Southern Literature 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Race/Science/Fiction

 

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