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science and culture

Technology Embodied – Body Modification, Synthetics, and the Posthuman in SF Literature [EXTENDED DEADLINE - 4/15/2019]

updated: 
Thursday, March 28, 2019 - 10:52am
Museum of Science Fiction/Escape Velocity Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

The Museum of Science Fiction is accepting 250-word proposals for 15-20 minute papers to be presented at this year’s Escape Velocity Conference in National Harbor Maryland, May 24th – 26th, 2019.

As technological development continues to advance at an unprecedented rate, humanity finds itself more and more integrated with, and oftentimes dependent on, technological amplifications, interventions, and solutions. As such technology becomes commonplace, blurring the boundaries between organic and synthetic life, we might ask ourselves, will we someday reach a point where being “human” ceases to mean anything?

Composing Climate Change: Atmosphere, Affect, Attention

updated: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 2:38pm
Departures in Critical Qualitative Research
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

SPECIAL ISSUE CALL FOR PAPERS

Composing Climate Change: Atmosphere, Affect, Attention

GUEST EDITOR: Joshua Trey Barnett

How to write of that which escapes linguistic capture? How to form into words and images precisely what slips the shackles of representational thought? How to describe what cannot, strictly speaking, be perceived? How to change climates in and through the activity of composition? How to compose climate change?

MMLA Panel

updated: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 2:36pm
Science and Fiction Panel
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 5, 2019

Taking up the MMLA conference theme, “Duality, Doubles, and Doppelgängers,” the panel for Science and Fiction seeks proposals engaging the presence of the double in fiction inflected or inspired by science, medicine, or technology; the fields’ theories or methods; or their practitioners. Oftentimes, the double is associated with the horror genre and presented as emblematic of Freud’s ideas about the uncanny, or the unheimlich (unhomely is the literal translation). The term describes the feeling of unease or fear one gets from experiencing something familiar turned uncomfortably strange. Fred Botting, however, notes that horror and science fiction each “give form to a sense of otherness” (Botting, 2008, 131).

Double the Dickens: Counterparts and Multiples in the Works

updated: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 11:37am
The Dickens Society/MMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 5, 2019

Charles Dickens utilizes various devices facilitating comparison and comprehension throughout many of his novels, short stories, and other literary output. Most famously, Dickens employed doubling and doppelgängers in A Tale of Two Cities (1859) to demonstrate the ideological similarities and differences between not only look-alikes Charles Darnay and Sydney Carton, but the cities of London and Paris. In Uneven Developments (1988), Mary Poovey has revealed how in David Copperfield (1850), the hero’s instinctive dislike for Uriah Heep’s mock humility may indicate his own discomfort regarding their similar financial positions and goals for career advancement.

British Literature and Technology, 1600-1830

updated: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019 - 1:55pm
U of Nebraska, Omaha and Colby College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, April 15, 2019

Call for Papers | British Literature and Technology, 1600-1830

Eds. Kristin Girten (U of Nebraska, Omaha) and Aaron R. Hanlon (Colby College)

 

We invite submissions for British Literature and the History of Technology, 1600-1830, a peer-reviewed, edited volume of essays for the Bucknell University Press Aperçus Series. The Aperçus Series focuses on connections between historiography, culture, and textual representation. The purpose of this volume is to provide a much-needed account of the role and history of technology in British literature and literary studies of the (very) long eighteenth century.

 

Inhuman Algorithms

updated: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019 - 2:24pm
Transformations: Journal of Media, Culture and Technology
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

CFP Issue 34: Inhuman Algorithms

http://www.transformationsjournal.org/calls-for-papers/

Algorithms are integral to a digital, networked, automated society. Thrown into the public spotlight by a certain high profile search engine, algorithms are increasingly recognised to exercise agency in practices such as governance, surveillance, online personalisation, medicine, design, high frequency trading, credit scoring and plagiarism. Computational machines make decisions about things, people, places and experiences, and humans learn to address algorithms.

Walker Percy

updated: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 12:08pm
Dr. Karey Perkins / Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Papers for this session may focus on any aspect of Walker Percy’s life and works, either fiction or non-fiction.  Especially welcome are topics relevant to the South Atlantic Modern Longauge Association's 2019 conference theme: “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships.”  For Percy, the human capacity for language and for naming gives us our identity and is only possible through relationships of intersubjectivity.  Percy wrote extensively on language, creating his “radical anthropology” based on his unique semiotic, with these themes pervasive in his novels.  For more information about conference theme, see:  https://samla.memberclicks.net/  

Resisting Digital Culture: Dystopias, Distortions, Disconnections

updated: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 10:56am
Rafael Lubner / King's College London Centre for Digital Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 28, 2019

Current debates about digital technology are caught in a death spiral of gloom, doom and anxiety. After a long period of optimism that accompanied the explosion of social media and assumptions of their democratic potential, today’s discourse is dominated by fear. Fear about the unchecked power of digital monopolies like Facebook, Google and Amazon; about the (ab)use of social media by far right political movements; about the psychopathologies, risks and trade-offs associated with constant and unyielding connectivity; fears about the radical surveillance enabled by the digital.

 

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