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Eating Otherwise: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Food and Culture. 28th February - 1st March 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 23, 2014 - 8:23am
full name / name of organization: 
Lancaster University (UK), Department of English and Creative Writing

We are pleased to invite 250 word abstract proposals for papers or panels for the two-day interdisciplinary symposium on food and culture titled 'Eating Otherwise'. The conference will be held at Lancaster University, Department of English & Creative Writing on the 28th of February and 1st of March 2015.

Peer-Reviewers Needed for Text on Edgar Allan Poe

updated: 
Saturday, August 23, 2014 - 12:02am
full name / name of organization: 
Gerry Del Guercio
contact email: 

Editor seeks 2-3 peer-reviewers for an upcoming collection of essays on Edgar Allan Poe. The ideal peer-reviewer will have advanced studies in American literature with a particular emphasis on Poe. The publisher will set the deadline. Please send resumes at gerry9301@bell.net by July 31, 2014.

[UPDATE] Disability and Young Adult Literature

updated: 
Friday, August 22, 2014 - 4:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jacob Stratman
contact email: 

Although there is a growing interest in disability studies in art, literature, film, politics, and religion, there is still a dearth of scholarship that explores the intersection between young adult literature and disability. In the last ten years, there have only been a small handful of peer-reviewed articles that explore any issue regarding young adult literature and disability. This gap in scholarship among young adult literature scholars and teachers is surprising because of two reasons: first, disability is a growing reality in all of our lives.

ASECS 2015 Panel: The English Catholic Community in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture

updated: 
Friday, August 22, 2014 - 2:23pm
full name / name of organization: 
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
contact email: 

Discussions of English Catholicism in the eighteenth century often treat Catholics as an "Other" against which English Protestant culture defined itself. Of course, English Catholics in the period also sought to define or represent themselves—sometimes to distinguish themselves from a Protestant "Other," and sometimes to bridge the divide between themselves and Protestants. This panel welcomes papers investigating representations of English Catholics in literary or non-literary writings and art produced by English Catholics, or papers investigating any aspect of English Catholic culture.

Target Practices from the Cold War to the War(s) on Terror (March 26-29, 2015)

updated: 
Friday, August 22, 2014 - 1:54pm
full name / name of organization: 
Annual Meeting, American Comparative Literature Association

In The Age of the World Target (2006) Rey Chow argues that we now live in an era in which "the target" is a key technological, geopolitical, and cultural figure. New technologies of targeting are emerging to reach global destinations with pinpoint precision; yet, errors result in accidental or unintentional targeting. "Being targeted" has become an everyday reality for many individuals and social groups: citizens are targets of national security states and mass Internet surveillance; "terrorists" (but also civilians) are targets of drone strikes; young individuals in U.S. cities are routinely targets of racial profiling by police. The overdetermined figure of the target reveals a sense of crisis on multiple fronts.

Kalamazoo 2015 - The Secret Life of Medieval Plants

updated: 
Friday, August 22, 2014 - 10:06am
full name / name of organization: 
50th International Congress on Medieval Studies Special Session
contact email: 

The Secret Life of Medieval Plants

Sprouting from the roots of popular science writers such as Michael Pollan and cultivated by philosophers of vegetal life such as Michael Marder and Matthew Hall, ecocriticism's recent turn toward plant studies expands on developments in animal studies and posthumanisms. Plant studies engages with current conversations on bioethics, food security, genetic engineering, and the moral authority of "Nature." As medievalists such as Gillian Rudd, Peggy McCracken, and Robert W. Barrett have recently shown, medieval studies is poised to make significant contributions to this fertile field of study through analyses of the symbolic, cultural, economic, ecological, and religious role plants played in history.

[UPDATE]

updated: 
Friday, August 22, 2014 - 10:05am
full name / name of organization: 
Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice

TALTP (http://cpcc.edu/taltp), a peer-reviewed journal, seeks articles aimed toward instructors of American literature courses in 4-year and 2-year universities and colleges. Our goal is to feature practical articles and reviews on best classroom practices, including the use of the Internet and other technology. Articles featuring the use of critical theories in teaching American literature and introducing minor or lost American authors are welcome, as are reviews of new titles that would interest instructors. Our readers seek to more effectively transfer their knowledge of, interest in, and passion for American literature to their students.

Medievalism in Young Adult and Children's Literature

updated: 
Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 8:34pm
full name / name of organization: 
Alexandra Garner/Bowling Green State University

Call for Papers

Conference: 50th Annual International Congress for Medieval Studies
Location/Date: Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 14-17 2015
Session: "Modernizing the Medieval for a New Generation: Medievalism in Young Adult and Children's Literature"
Organizer: Alexandra Garner, Bowling Green State University

CFP: BAAS PG Conference 2014 (Abstracts due September 1st, 2014)

updated: 
Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 6:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
British Association for American Studeis

Protest: Resistance and Dissent in America
BAAS Postgraduate Conference, Saturday 15th November 2014
University of Sussex
Keynote speakers:
Professor Will Kaufman (University of Central Lancashire)
Dr Joe Street (Northumbria University)

The Ugly Laws and Beyond: Beholding and Regulating Disability in an Urban Landscape (NeMLA, Toronto, Ontario/2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 5:10pm
full name / name of organization: 
Anthony Dotterman
contact email: 

In her work, The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public, Susan Schweik explores how "ugly laws"--municipal legislation which barred "any person who was diseased, maimed, or mutilated in any way" from "expos[ing] him [or herself] to public view,"-- spread throughout the United States and abroad during the nineteenth century, reflecting society's fears of the effect of "imperfect" or disabled bodies on/in an urban populace. Indeed, from fears of degeneration in turn of the century London to questions over the nature of self reliance in America, society has seen disability as something needing to be controlled and quarantined, lest the "contagion (s)" contained in the disabled body could spread in the densely packed confines of the city.

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