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Ashgate Studies in Publishing History: Manuscript, Print, Digital call for book proposals

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 1:19pm
full name / name of organization: 
Ashgate Publishing
contact email: 

The series editors welcome proposals for interdisciplinary and comparative studies by humanities scholars working in a variety of fields, including literature; book history, periodicals history, print culture and the sociology of texts; theater, film, and performance studies; library history; history; gender studies; and cultural studies. Topics might include publishing histories of major figures or works, of regions, of genres, or studies of particular publishers or practices (including production, distribution, and reception) that hold special aesthetic, social, or political significance.

Mary Elizabeth Braddon Blog

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 12:47pm
full name / name of organization: 
MEBA- The Mary Elizabeth Braddon Association
contact email: 

The Mary Elizabeth Braddon Association will shortly be launching our website and blog in conjunction with our inaugural meeting at the VPFA conference in July. We welcome submissions for the blog of 750-1,000 words on topics pertaining to Braddon and sensation fiction. We are especially interested in brief highlights of your current work on Braddon, experiences teaching Braddon and discussions of the importance of Braddon and sensation fiction in Victorian literature and cultural studies. Submissions or questions can be directed to Dr. Janine Hatter and Anna Brecke at braddoninfo@gmail.com.

The Good Life and the Greater Good in a Global Context

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 11:13am
full name / name of organization: 
Laura Savu Walker
contact email: 

Dear colleagues,
I'm writing to invite you to submit proposals for a collection of essays that is tentatively titled The Good Life and the Greater Good in a Global Context. Please take a look at the brief description of the topic, its rationale, and research questions below. Feel free to add any other comments and questions and let me know if you are interested in contributing. My own essay examines the transnational dimensions of "that moral-intimate-economic thing called 'the good life'" (Berlant 2) as theorized by cultural critic Lauren Berlant and imagined by Pakistani novelist Mohsin Hamid in his latest novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2012).

[UPDATE] Everywhere is a Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:54am
full name / name of organization: 
TYCA-SW / Two Year College English Association -- Southwest
contact email: 

Everywhere is a Classroom
Two-Year College English Association-Southwest
TYCA-SW ANNUAL CONFERENCE, Embassy Suites, Frisco, TX
October 23-25, 2014

Uncertain Spaces: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums. Lisbon, 30 October-1 November 2014

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:39am
full name / name of organization: 
Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, IST-ID, IHA-UNL
contact email: 

International Conference - CALL FOR PAPERS

"UNCERTAIN SPACES: Virtual Configurations in Contemporary Art and Museums"

31 October | 1 November 2014, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal

Over the past decades, and especially since the generalization of the Internet, artists have been actively exploring the potentialities of new media languages and communities, often blurring artistic categories. Movements like Digital Art or Internet Art clearly demonstrate how these technological means came to shape challenging new territories for contemporary art, not only in terms of creation, reception and participation, but also regarding its preservation, collection, curatorship or exhibition.

The Romance of Sidney and Spenser - Seminar (NeMLA, April 30-May 3, 2015, Toronto)

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 10:23am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

NeMLA 2015 46th Annual Convention
Toronto, April 30-May 3, 2015

The Romance of Sidney and Spenser

This seminar explores how Sidney and Spenser engage with and develop the romance framework alongside and against their contemporaries. How do these poets revise, contest, or maintain conventions of romance in their own works? How do they represent and reconcile the genre's tendency toward contradiction, conflation, and multiplicity? How do they influence later authors and contribute to the evolution of the genre and its concerns in the English tradition?

Love and Loss in Modernist Poetry (NEMLA, Toronto, April 30-May 3, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 9:54am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

While poetry itself has played a historically long and significant role in the discourse of love, the period of modernity seems to be largely associated with its opposites. As the standard narrative goes, citizens the world over felt overwhelmed and frightened by the sundry and rapid changes – literal, conceptual, moral, and beyond – brought about by industrialization, scientific developments, WWI, etc. And the poetry that characterizes this time period represents and reflects on some of the more devastating changes. But what happens to poetic love in the early 20th century? What specifically happens when love, loss, and poetry come together during such a fraught time?

LiNQ, vol. 41 - Apocalypse

updated: 
Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 7:45am
full name / name of organization: 
James Cook University (Australia)
contact email: 

Scenarios for the apocalypse seem to proliferate in popular culture. John R. Hall believes that numerous examples suggest that "an apocalyptic mood is no longer confined to cultures of religious fundamentalism" but is also demonstrated in "diverse mainstream apocalyptic references" (1). In the media, the apocalypse generates news headlines; in October 2013, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that scientists had found "evidence of an apocalypse on a planetary system similar to our own" (von Radowitz). In 2012, the belief that the end of the Mayan calendar on 21 December would mean the end of the world triggered thousands of blog posts. A poll of 16,000 adults showed 8 per cent suffered genuine anxiety that the world would end on that day.

Call for Peer Reviewers | Kaleidoscope journal

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 8:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Laura McKenzie | Durham University

Kaleidoscope is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal edited by postgraduate researchers at Durham University. A key feature of Kaleidoscope is that it embodies and connects diverse subject areas in a single publication, whether in the Arts and Humanities, the Sciences, or the Social Sciences.

Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of Lord of the Rings (The Mithril Turtle)--DUE JULY 20, 2014

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 7:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Michelle Markey Butler/University of Maryland
contact email: 

2014 is the sixtieth anniversary of Lord of the Rings. The Mithril Turtle is the University of Maryland College Park's commemoration of this important literary and cultural milestone. A variety of events are planned for September 1 – October 17, 2014.

Among these is an interdisciplinary discussion series. Tolkien's created world is realistically and compellingly realized, making it ideal for creative exploration of a wide range of disciplines. We invite proposals that use the lens of Lord of the Rings and Middle-earth to focus attention upon cutting edge research and scholarship.

Topics might include (but are not limited to):

[UPDATE] Pastoral Cities

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 3:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Midwest Modern Language Association

In his study Pastoral Cities (1987), James L. Machor gives the name "urban-pastoral" to a cultural myth of rural-urban synthesis, which he deems foundational to the moral geography of American life, from the Puritans' "City on a Hill" to Frederick Law Olmsted's "City Beautiful". To recognize and complicate this rural-urban dream, Machor argues, was one of the achievements of American writers through the nineteenth century. And yet, despite the recent pastoral turn in literary scholarship, few critics have analyzed urban-pastoralism in later or less canonical works.

'To (Not So) Boldly Go': Science Fiction as Instrument of Colonial Enterprise

updated: 
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 3:19pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

Both science fiction and postcolonial theory are concerned with troubling normative understandings of movement, diaspora, and hybridity. Indeed, "The Stranger in the Strange Land" is an oppositional trope that is at the heart of both science fiction and historical colonial encounters. The other-worldliness and futurity of science fiction has offered numerous writers an effective (and increasingly popular) medium to critique political, social, and cultural issues, and in many ways presents an ideal literary landscape to interrogate the colonial enterprise. Even so, there is a relative lack of postcolonial voices in the mainstream SF genre. What accounts for this silence?

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