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Locating Southeast Asian Horror / Special Journal Issue / Due date 1 December 2014

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 11:44am
Plaridel Journal of Communication, Media, and Society

Plaridel Special Issue
Locating Southeast Asian Horror

Issue editors: Katarzyna Ancuta & Patrick F. Campos

The unprecedented success of Japanese and Korean horror on international markets in the early 2000s increased the demand for the genre from the region, but also set a new standard against which these productions were judged. Encouraged by the enthusiastic reception of (the problematically labeled but widely accepted category) "Asian Horror" by commentators and the global fan community, Southeast Asian national cinemas began to revitalize their local horror genres, and distributors eventually turned to Southeast Asian horror as well.

"For the World's Benefit": Transnational Perspectives on the First Century of the Panama Canal November 28th, 2014 Paris

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 11:17am
Université de Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle

The centennial of the canal's inauguration provides an opportunity to renew inquiry about Panama's mission of "service to the world," as stated by the country's motto. The colloquium approaches the history of the canal in light of recent efforts to promote "global," "connected," or "transnational" history. It aims both to reassess the geopolitics of the canal's control and

[UPDATE] CFP: Panel on Fan Spaces at PCA/ACA conference, New Orleans (Apr. 1-4, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 10:39am
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

As the popularity of this year's San Diego Comic Con proved, fan spaces are increasingly important culturally and financially. Media creators and producers have come to acknowledge the significance of their fans and the need to communicate with them, particularly through social media. Fans, however, also insist upon their own self-contained spaces where they can share their opinions and observations, as well as transformative and fan works, without the threat of censorship or harassment. These spaces exist both physically (as in, for example, in the form of fan conventions and fan meet ups) and virtually through social media platforms such as Tumblr, twitter, and Ao3.

[UPDATE] Journal of Bruce Springsteen Studies

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 10:21am
BOSS: The Biannual Online-Journal of Springsteen Studies

BOSS: The Biannual Online-Journal of Springsteen Studies is an open access academic journal that publishes peer-reviewed essays pertaining to Bruce Springsteen. The editors of BOSS are currently soliciting papers for the journal's second edition. BOSS provides a scholarly space for Springsteen Studies in the contemporary academy by publishing articles that examine the political, economic, and socio-cultural factors that have influenced Springsteen's music and shaped its reception. The editors of BOSS welcome broad interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary approaches to Springsteen's songwriting, performance, and fan community, as well as studies that conform to specific disciplinary perspectives.

The Poetics of Knowledge (5-7 Nov 2015, Berne, Switzerland)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 10:10am
Wolfgang Funk (Leibniz University Hanover) and Irmtraud Huber (University of Berne)

One very common narrative about Victorian Britain is that it was an age of ground-breaking scientific discoveries: Charles Lyell significantly extended the age of our planet; Charles Darwin forced a rethinking of the origins and development of life; Michael Faraday and James Maxwell Clark paved the way for modern physics; Non-Euclidean Geometry changed the way mathematicians measured and formalized the world; Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace laid the foundation for computing. The list could be expanded at leisure, as scientists made and remade the various fields in which humans have tried to make sense of the natural world.

Andrea Brady Symposium UK: Call for Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 9:31am
Contemporary Poetics Research Centre, Birkbeck University of London

*Call for Papers*

"A copia of words": On Andrea Brady
Andrea Brady Symposium
Date: 13th December 2014
Venue: Keynes Library, Birkbeck, University of London (43 Gordon Square)
Keynote speaker: Professor Carol Watts (Birkbeck)
The symposium will be followed by a reading by Andrea Brady.

Abstracts deadline: October 1st, 2014.

Call for Submissions: Teaching Materials for the Second Edition of Thinking about Television's Mad Men

updated: 
Tuesday, September 2, 2014 - 2:35am
Jimmie Manning

On behalf of my co-editors Jennifer C. Dunn and Danielle M. Stern, I am glad to announce that we have been invited to prepare a second edition of our book Lucky Strikes and a Three-Martini Lunch: Thinking about Television's Mad Men. This new edition will feature revisions to essays from the first edition, new essays that explore later developments in the program, and a new section that will offer teaching materials for those interested in using the book in the classroom. The second edition will be released in conjunction with the final episodes of the popular AMC series.

"'Hysteria Beyond Freud': Nineteenth-Century Nerves" -- Due September 30, 2014; Conference April 30-May 3, 2015

updated: 
Monday, September 1, 2014 - 8:38pm
NeMLA 2015

Showalter's definition of the fin de siècle as the 'golden age of hysteria' in her seminal work, The Female Malady, bolstered late-twentieth-century theory and criticism's association between 'hysteria' and European fin de siècle culture and medicine. Literary critics, historians, and cultural theorists are reopening the discussion of 'hysteria' and, in effect, shifting our understandings of its role in gender ideology, literary form, and politics beyond the turn of the century. This roundtable takes up the title of the authoritative, cultural history, Hysteria Beyond Freud, in order to foster and take part in this new discussion.

ASECS: "Migrants, Exiles, and the State of Statelessness in the Eighteenth Century"

updated: 
Monday, September 1, 2014 - 6:34pm
Juliet Shields / American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies

In his "Reflections on Exile," Edward Said asked "if true exile is a condition of terminal loss, why has it been transformed so easily into a potent, even enriching, motif of modern culture?" Arguably, this motif emerged in the eighteenth century, as
colonialism and the consolidation of the modern nation-state made more visible the movement--sometimes voluntary and sometimes forced--of peoples across and within political and geographical borders.
This interdisciplinary panel invites papers that address exile, migration, and statelessness in the long eighteenth century.

ASECS: "Migrants, Exiles, and the State of Statelessness in the Eighteenth Century"

updated: 
Monday, September 1, 2014 - 6:32pm
Juliet Shields / American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies

In his "Reflections on Exile," Edward Said asked "if true exile is a condition of terminal loss, why has it been transformed so easily into a potent, even enriching, motif of modern culture?" Arguably, this motif emerged in the eighteenth century, as
colonialism and the consolidation of the modern nation-state made more visible the movement--sometimes voluntary and sometimes forced--of peoples across and within political and geographical borders.
This interdisciplinary panel invites papers that address exile, migration, and statelessness in the long eighteenth century.

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