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The HUMAN journal is now open for submissions

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 10:51am
The Human: Journal of Literature and Culture

The Human (issn: 2147-9739) is an international and interdisciplinary journal that publishes articles written in the fields of literatures in English (British, American, Irish, etc.), classical and modern Turkish literature, drama & theatre studies, and comparative literature (where the pieces bridge literature of a country with Turkish literature). To learn more about The Human and its principles, please visit this page:
http://www.humanjournal.org

[UPDATE] Call for Papers for NeoAmericanist Issue 7.2

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 10:11am
NeoAmericanist

NeoAmericanist, an online multi-disciplinary journal for the study of America, is issuing an extension on its CALL FOR PAPERS to interested Undergraduate and Graduate students. We are accepting any academic PAPERS as well as REVIEWS of books from Bachelor, Master and Doctoral level students on the topic of the United States of America.

[Deadline extended to 31/05/2014] In principio fuit interpres: Translation as the Genesis and Palingenesis of Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2014 - 5:29am
Paola Cattani, Matteo Fadini, Federico Saviotti

Please note that «Ticontre» Journal deadline for the Call for contributions for the monographic section "In principio fuit interpres: Translation as the Genesis and Palingenesis of Literature" has been extended to May, 31st, 2014.

«È noto che all'inizio di nuove tradizioni di lingua scritta e letteraria, fin dove possiamo spingere lo sguardo, sta molto spesso la traduzione: sicché al vulgato superbo motto idealistico in principio fuit poëta vien fatto di contrapporre oggi l'umile realtà che in principio fuit interpres, il che significa negare nella storia l'assolutezza o autoctonia di ogni cominciamento.» (Gianfranco Folena, Volgarizzare e tradurre, Torino, Einaudi, 1994)

Republics of Letters - A Journal of Literature, Arts, Politics, and the Arts - Call for submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 7:50pm
Arcade, Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, Stanford University

Republics of Letters is a peer-reviewed, digital journal dedicated to the study of knowledge, politics, and the arts, from Antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the early modern period. Articles are organized by forum, each of which, unlike special issues in print journals, will continue to accept new material over time. All articles are freely accessible. The journal is sponsored by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages (DLCL) of Stanford University.

The Renaissance Formerly Known as Harlem: Race and Diaspora in the Global City

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 6:58pm
MMLA/Midwest Modern Language Association

This special session for MMLA 2014 (Detroit, Nov 13-16) seeks papers on the Renaissance formerly known as Harlem. Recent scholarly debates—including the recent special issue of Modernism/modernity on "The Harlem Renaissance and the New Modernist Studies" (20.3)—have suggested new terminology to define the New Negro movement in the United States during the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. From "New Negro" to "Black" Renaissance, these terms highlight alternative spheres of black cultural production. While it is necessary to move beyond the narrow geographic parameters of the "Harlem" Renaissance, it is also important to break open Harlem itself and to understand it as a globally inflected cityscape.

Leisure, Pleasure, and Entertainment

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 4:16pm
EC/ASECS

LEISURE PLEASURE & ENTERTAINMENT

45TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE EAST-CENTRAL AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES (EC/ASECS)

University of Delaware
November 6-8, 2014

We're gonna party like it's 1769! A culture of leisure, pleasure, and entertainment grew from infancy to maturity during the eighteenth century. The changing face of public places—theatres, pleasure gardens, taverns, coffeehouses and brothels—reflects the dynamic change underway in arts and culture. These developments can be seen on both sides of the Atlantic. Pleasure was also a mentality, something that people sought in their day-to-day lives.

Pastoral Cities, MMLA (Nov. 13-16, 2014, Detroit)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 2:25pm
Midwest Modern Language Association

In his study Pastoral Cities (1987), James L. Machor gives the name "urban-pastoral" to a cultural myth of rural-urban synthesis, which he deems foundational to the moral geography of American life, from the Puritans' "City on a Hill" to Frederick Law Olmsted's "City Beautiful". To recognize and complicate this rural-urban dream, Machor argues, was one of the achievements of American writers through the nineteenth century. And yet, despite the recent pastoral turn in literary scholarship, few critics have analyzed urban-pastoralism in later or less canonical works.

[Update] Beyond Life: The Rise of Undead Culture, 112th PAMLA Annual Conference, Riverside CA, 10/31-11/2/2014

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 1:13pm
Roland Finger, Cuesta College

CFP for Beyond Life: The Rise of Undead Culture

Please submit proposals on the undead and culture for the Beyond Life panel at the 2014 PAMLA Conference, held at the Riverside Convention Center, California, Friday, October 31 - Sunday, November 2, 2014.

The undead have forcefully risen in popular literature and media and targeted the pillars of society—identity, family, religion, and government. Normal life simultaneously loses and acquires value vis-à-vis threats from the undead. This session investigates the significance of the undead within culture, literature, and philosophy.

Proposal Deadline: May 15, 2014

Props and Vessels: Pregnancy, Maternity, and Birth as Objectified Performance

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 10:34am
American Society for Theatre Research

When blogger Lady Goo Goo Gaga opened a Pottery Barn Kids catalog, she discovered that she is a "very, very bad mother...because I have not once shaped sandwiches into a tic-tac-toe game utilizing carrot shreds and pieces of grapes." The catalog's lunch boxes, displaying an idealized vision of mother's love in comestible form, highlight the way props become an intrinsic part of maternal performance.

[UPDATE] The Sustainability of the Avant-Garde, SAMLA November 7-9

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 9:30am
SAMLA

In a 2005 essay entitled "Why Experimental Fiction Threatens to Destroy Publishing, Jonathan Franzen and Life as We Know It: A Correction," American fiction writer Ben Marcus suggests that by catering to the masses, authors have willingly diluted their literary works. For Marcus, this is frightening because it means that novelists are "selling out" to readers who crave easy reads in exchange for the author gaining some economic stability. Even worse, he attests that the publishing world is squeezing out those experimental writers whose works are not necessarily economically viable precisely because they do not appeal to a wide audience.

NANCY DREW AND HER SISTERS: GIRL DETECTIVES IN THE 20TH CENTURY, SAMLA 2014, Nov. 7-9

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 9:21am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

This panel considers depictions of young women in mystery fiction written for the teen audience in the 20th Century. Characters such as Nancy Drew, Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden, and countless others provided role models for young readers, and this panel considers these figures in terms of the intersections between scholarship and fandom.

URGENT MSA 2014: Marginal Masculinities: Queer, Black, Wayward

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 8:38am
Modernist Studies Association

Conference: MSA 16, November 6-9, 2014. Pittsburgh, PA. Omni Hotel

Panel:"Marginal Masculinities: Queer, Black, Wayward."
Organizers: Greg Forter, Peter Nagy

We are open to a broad array of approaches to the topic of modernist masculinities. But, in particular, the panel seeks to focus on figures and texts that undermine the conceptions of male identity and desire that critics often claim modernism was committed to shoring up.

The deadline for panel proposal is May 9th. If you are interested, please send a brief paper description and CV to Peter Nagy, pen208@lehigh.edu, as soon as possible.

Serious gaming (Oxford, July 2014) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 - 2:32am
Catherine Bouko

Serious gaming (Oxford, July 2014)

Special session about serious gaming during the 6th Global Conference: Video Games Culture Project, from Thursday, 17th July to Saturday, 19th July 2014, Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Key words: serious games, serious gaming, education, projects with students, level design, case studies

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