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Art/Literature/Music as Satire and Social Commentary in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 4:08pm
The New Union

We require articles on political and cultural subjects for issue 3 of The New Union. For more information and to see our current issue, visit www.new-union.co.uk. Please be sure to read our 'About' page.

We are particularly interested in publishing articles that look at how art, literature, music, etc are used as a means of satire or social commentary in the twenty-first century.

Articles should be between 4,000-6,000 words long, do not need to be written in an academic style, and should include no footnotes. Please send completed articles to editors@new-union.co.uk by 31 July 2014.

[UPDATE] Call for Papers on Television, MPCA/ACA Conference October 3-5 2014

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 12:06pm
Cory Barker, Television Area Chair

Update: The deadline for submissions has been extended to May 15, 2014.

CALL FOR PAPERS ON TELEVISION

Midwest Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2014 Conference

Oct. 3-5, 2014

JW Marriot Indianapolis in Indianapolis, IN
10 S. West St., Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone: (317) 860-5800.

The Television area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its 2014 conference in Indianapolis, Indiana. We are looking for papers that examine any aspect of television, from any time period, and using any number of methods. Potential topics for paper or panel proposals include, but are not limited to:

Feminism and Pop Culture: Feminist Literature and Theory Panel

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 10:51am
SAMLA: South Atlantic Modern Language Association

When Beyoncé featured an audio clip of Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TED Talk "We Should All Be Feminists" in her 2013 single "Flawless," she helped to fuel the resurgence of feminism as a still-relevant tool to promote "the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes." This resurgence in feminism's popularity can be seen in many forms of popular culture, for example, in the growing readership of websites such as Jezebel and Upworthy, or in campaigns such as "#BanBossy" and "I need feminism because . . . ." This rise in feminism's trendiness bears significant implications on feminist studies in an academic context, as well.

Shakespeare and Classical Authors, Special Session RSA Berlin, 26-28 March 2015

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 8:59am
Dr. Judith A. Deitch

This session will investigate Shakespeare's self-schooling in authorship through his reading of classical authors—the rediscovered representatives of secular antiquity. Rather than assessing whether Shakespeare was "a classicist," let us focus on his multidisciplinary reading both in terms of strategic literary re-deployment, as well as in terms of his self-development as an author. What might Shakespeare have gained in techniques, motifs or themes to be extracted, imitated, altered, rearranged, or avoided?

[UPDATE] Between Journal (journal issue) "Technology, Imagination, Narrative Forms" (Vol. 4, n. 8, 2014)

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 8:13am
Between Journal (University of Cagliari, Italy)

In the last decades, especially since the inception of digital literature, the impact of new technologies on narrative forms has been increasingly discussed: from George P. Landow's seminal work on early hypertexts (1997) to Katherine Hayles' s ruminations on how we write and think in posthuman times (2012). State of the art enquiries growingly consider the way in which texts interface with technologies in a continuous process of 'remediation' (i.e. the 'refashioning' of old media by new media – Bolter and Grusin, 2001), and the 'radiant' textualities (Jerome McGann, 2001) which are the outcome of this process, as well as the focus of a more 'media-conscious' narratology (see Marie-Laure Ryan, 2004; and 2014, forthcoming).

CFP: Melancholy Ethics – Ecocriticism and the Moving Image in a Planetary Age, July 5-6, 2014

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 6:09am
The Program Committee of the Association for Studies of Culture and Representation

CFP: Melancholy Ethics – Ecocriticism and the Moving Image in a Planetary Age

The Program Committee of the Association for Studies of Culture and Representation invites proposal submissions for an interdisciplinary panel titled "Melancholy Ethics – Ecocriticism and the Moving Image in a Planetary Age." The panel will be held at the 9th Annual Meeting on July 5-6, 2014 at the Komaba campus of the University of Tokyo, Japan. We are looking for 20 minutes presentations in either English or Japanese language that address theoretical and historical issues of moving image in general and images of the city in particular raised by the present planetary situation. The deadline for proposal submissions is May 15, 2014.

MASCULINITIES: A Journal of Identity and Culture - CFP for Second Issue

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 4:38am
Initiative for Critical Studies of Masculinities (ICSM)

Critical studies on men and masculinities is a developing and interdisciplinary field of inquiry, flourished in association with the feminist and LGBTQ studies since its establishment in the 1980's by the substantial efforts of authors such as Raewyn Connell, Michael Kimmel, Jeff Hearn, Victor Seidler and David Morgan among many others. This field is now elaborating and promoting its own issues and agendas. Masculinities: A Journal of Identity and Culture, an internationally refereed journal which is published biannually in February and August by Initiative for Critical Studies of Masculinities (ICSM), is a part of these efforts.

CFP Spatial Justice and Diaspora: Law, Chaos and Postcoloniality (Deadline 30 June 2014)

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 1:18am
Critical Legal Conference, University of Sussex

This stream will engage with critical theories of spatiality in relation to issues of postcoloniality, globalisation, diaspora, and migration. It will interrogate scales of legality across multiple jurisdictions and consider the development of an aesthetics of resistance in diasporic communities. In an increasingly interconnected, 'globalised' world, there is a growing demand for a recognition of processes of adaptation and resistance in the form of legal pluralism as a historical contingency. This demand varies in its articulation, from decolonial refraction to the empirical negotiation of diasporic laws and the call for a redefinition of the nation-state as the irrevocable 'centre'.

PAMLA 2014: Architecture, Space, and Literature (Riverside, CA: Oct. 31 - Nov. 2) DEADLINE: Thursday Mar, 15.

updated: 
Monday, April 28, 2014 - 12:19am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association (PAMLA)

Most literary works take place within the context of some sort of constructed space, e.g. a house, an office, a transit node, a place of worship, a place of performance. The constraints and opportunities of such a setting often contribute to our understanding of characters, actions and ideas. Architecture also provides a rich system of tropes by which readers and writers can define important elements of text either literally or figuratively. This panel seeks papers on literary works from any genre, region or time period that consider the treatment of architecture as background, foreground, structural model or other component of the literary work or works in question.

[UPDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED: "Heroes in Popular Culture"- MPCA Conference, Indianapolis, IN. Oct. 3-5, 2014

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 8:30pm
Jef Burnham, DePaul University

Extended Submission Deadline: May 15, 2014

Papers can explore any topic relating to heroes and/or prevailing notions of heroism as they present themselves in popular culture. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Superheroes and action stars as heroic icons
-Video games and the experience of vicarious heroism
-Connections between violence and heroism
-The gendering of heroism
-Heroines in young adult fiction
-Anti-heroes in film and television
-Heroes and religion/mythology
-Hero worship
-Real world heroes in the news and biographies

[Update] [Deadline Extended] Edited Collection: Memory in Popular Culture [abstracts due 6/1/14]

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 7:04pm
Heather Urbanski

Upcoming collection on memory in popular culture, under contract with McFarland and Company, seeks proposals for academic essays on the complex role of rhetorical and social memory in science fiction, fantasy, fandom, and online gaming. Abstracts now due 6/1/14 with final essays due 11/15/14.

Details
For the upcoming collection Essays on Memory in Popular Culture, I am seeking contributions that describe and analyze the complex rhetorical memory involved in contemporary popular culture reception and consumption.

2014 MPCA/ACA Conference: Animation and Anime -- DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MAY 15

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 6:41pm
Dr. Mark Gellis/Kettering University

Call for Papers. The Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association seeks proposals for papers and panels on animation and anime for its 2014 Conference, to be held Friday-Sunday, 3-5 October 2014 at the JW Marriott Indianapolis in Indianapolis, IN. As animation and anime cover all kinds of storytelling, topics may include but are not limited to the following suggestions:

• Social and political themes in animation and anime (environmentalism, gender roles, ethnic and cultural stereotypes, political corruption, etc.)

• Using animation and anime in the classroom

• Genres of (and in) animation and anime (love and romance, fantasy, horror, erotica, science fiction, crime and mystery, historical dramas, etc.)

Reconstruction, Conservation, Restoration: Reconciling the Past through Word and Image

updated: 
Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 6:20pm
University of Dundee

'Renaissance literary works are no longer regarded either as a fixed set of texts…that contain their own determinate meanings or as a stable set of reflections of historical facts that lie beyond them…rather they are made up and constantly redrawn by artists, audiences, and readers. These collective social constructions on the one hand define the range of aesthetic possibilities within a given representational mode and, on the other, link that mode to the complex network of institutions, practices and beliefs that constitute the culture as a whole.'
Stephen Greenblatt, The Power of Forms in the English Renaissance (1982)

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