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CFP: Victorian Bodies and Body Parts

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2013 - 4:17am
Victorian Network

The ninth issue of Victorian Network, guest edited by Professor Pamela K. Gilbert (University of Florida), is dedicated to a reassessment of the place of the human body in the Victorian literary and cultural imagination. Rapid medical and scientific advances, advancing industrialization and new forms of labour, legal reforms, the rise of comparative ethnology and anthropology, the growth of consumer culture, and the ever changing trends of Victorian fashion are just a few of the many forces that transformed how Victorians thought about the human body and about the relationship between the embodied, or disembodied, self and the object world.

[UPDATE] Extended Deadline: Games of Late Modernity (Leusden, NL: January 15-17 2014)

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2013 - 3:58am
Tilburg University / Huizinga Research Institute / ISVW

The end of this year will be marked by the 75th anniversary of Johan Huizinga's classic study of the Homo Ludens. Its main thesis is as striking as it is simple: Culture is founded on and as a form of play. Huizinga's historical, philosophical and anthropological aim was to understand play as a 'totality'. The element of play can be observed in all different aspects of culture, ranging from seemingly innocuous leisure activities to the uttermost serious and advanced systems, such as the financial world, political institutions, mass media and warfare.

[UPDATE] Extended Deadline: Games of Late Modernity (Leusden, NL: January 15-17 2014)

updated: 
Monday, September 9, 2013 - 3:51am
Tilburg University / Huizinga Research Institute / ISVW

The end of this year will be marked by the 75th anniversary of Johan Huizinga's classic study of the Homo Ludens, arguably the single most important Dutch contribution to the international scholarly field of the twentieth century. As the subtitle – A Study of the Play Element in Culture – indicates, Huizinga inquires into a fundamental characteristic of human culture and society. The main thesis of the book may appear to be as striking as it seems to be simple: Culture is played from the very first till the very last minute. Culture is founded on a form of play while at the same time being an expression of play. Huizinga tried to understand play as a 'totality'.

[UPDATE] New Voices 2014 Graduate Student Conference- Origins, Identity, and Authenticity - 01/30/14 - 02/01/14 - Atlanta, GA

updated: 
Sunday, September 8, 2013 - 8:55pm
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

New Voices is an interdisciplinary graduate student conference hosted by Georgia State University's English department and sponsored by the department's Graduate English Association. The conference is designed to provide emerging and experienced graduate scholars in the humanities with a forum for sharing their latest research. While the conference has a different suggested theme each year, adherence to the suggested theme is not at all necessary to be considered for inclusion in the conference. New Voices invites papers on all topics and themes related not only to English studies, but all other humanities disciplines as well as the social sciences and political science.

Conference on the Harlem Renaissance

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2013 - 1:29pm
Paine College

The Department of Humanities at Paine College is requesting proposals for the annual Conference on the Harlem Renaissance to be held on our historic campus in Augusta, GA. The theme for 2013 is "Midwives and Mavericks: Architects, Artists, and Critics of the Renaissance." The focus for presentations will center on the literature, history, philosophy, art, and music, as well as inter- and cross-disciplinary approaches to the lives, work, and impact of a variety of architects, artists, and critics of the Harlem Renaissance Era.

Geocriticism and Spatial Literary Studies (new Palgrave Macmillan book series)

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2013 - 12:19pm
Robert T. Tally Jr., series editor

Geocriticism and Spatial Literary Studies is a new book series from Palgrave Macmillan focusing on the dynamic relations among space, place, and literature. The spatial turn in the humanities and social sciences has occasioned an explosion of innovative, multidisciplinary scholarship in recent years, and geocriticism, broadly conceived, has been among the more promising developments in spatially oriented literary studies. Whether focused on literary geography, cartography, geopoetics, or the spatial humanities more generally, geocritical approaches enable readers to reflect upon the representation of space and place, both in imaginary universes and in those zones where fiction meets reality.

[UPDATE] Deadline extended: Utopia in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2013 - 9:01am
University of North Georgia Arts and Letters Conference 2014

Utopia in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

University of North Georgia – Dahlonega, GA
February 28 – March 2, 2014
proposal deadline: September 30, 2013

From early ideas of a perfect human condition to a more modern conception of technological or social nirvana, visions of utopia have permeated our histories. Their genesis is often in response to social and political struggle, or is a reaction to imperfect reality. They are commentaries on the aspirations of our predecessors and present dreamers for the potential that lives within us all. This interdisciplinary conference seeks to examine how human experience and culture has impacted our idea of utopia in the present, in times and places past, and in the future.

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