category: theatre

Call for Submissions: Monsters and the Monstrous,Volume 2, Number 1, Special Issue on Monstrous Memory

full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Net
contact email: 
monstersjournal@inter-disciplinary.net

Journal Announcement and Call for Submissions

Monsters and the Monstrous
Volume 2, Number 1, Special Issue on Monstrous Memory

The Editors welcome contributions to the journal in the form of

Synæsthesia and ‘Video Gaming’ (v. 2 n. 1) (submissions due by 12/31/12)

full name / name of organization: 
Synæsthesia: Communication Across Cultures / Synæsthesia Journal
contact email: 
editors@synaesthesiajournal.com

Thought, engagement and communication of meanings depend upon perception.

CFP for Fan CULTure: An Examination of Participatory Fandom in the 21st Century

full name / name of organization: 
Drs. Kristin M Barton & Jonathan Lampley
contact email: 
jlampley@daltonstate.edu

With the advent of new media technologies and social networking sites making communication faster and easier than ever, there exists a dearth of opportunity to see how fan cultures have evolved as a r

Bridging the Gap: Israeli and Palestinian Relations and Culture (MLA, Boston, Jan. 2013)

full name / name of organization: 
Morani Kornberg-Weiss
contact email: 
moraniko@buffalo.edu

This Special Session focuses on Israeli and Palestinian relations and seeks to provide a forum for examining notions of “conflict,” identity, war, peace, and protest

From Wall Street to Main Street: The Regional Politics of Occupying (an edited collection, April 1)

full name / name of organization: 
Todd Comer and Nathan Crook
contact email: 
occupydefiance@gmail.com

Broad messages, complicated political positions, and blurred generational and class lines characterize and problematize the Occupy Wall Street movement.

[UPDATE] The Atrium

full name / name of organization: 
The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Community Voices
contact email: 
nriecken@ivytech.edu

THE ATRIUM: A Journal of Academic Community Voices, is a publication of the English and Communications Department of Ivy Tech Community College's Northwest Region, and is the only academic journal of

[REMINDER] "Literature and the Philosophy of Technology" Special Session MLA Boston 2013 (March 1, 2012)

full name / name of organization: 
Jessica Kuskey
contact email: 
jekuskey@syr.edu

Please consider this CFP for a Special Session for MLA 2013, Boston:

"Literature and the Philosophy of Technology"

Description:

Shakespeare, RMMLA, October 11-13, 2012 (Boulder, CO)

full name / name of organization: 
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
contact email: 
respinosa2@utep.edu

This session welcomes proposals for papers that examine any theme pertaining to Shakespeare. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, gender, race, and religious studies in Shakespeare.

MLA BOSTON 2013-The Renaissance Anthropocene: Imagining Life Without Nature in Early Modern Literature-DEADLINE MARCH 14

full name / name of organization: 
Justin Kolb, Oberlin College
contact email: 
justinbarneskolb@gmail.com

Coined by environmental scientists to describe the current geological epoch, "Anthropocene" denotes an age in which human action has pervasively and irreversibly transformed the land, sea, and atmosphere of the Earth, creating an ecology in which nature cannot be disentangled from artifice.

This concept existed in the minds of early modern writers under other names, especially "the decay of nature," as they imagined a world in which technologies ranging from alchemy to poetics might improve, degrade, or outright replace natural processes.

The Renaissance Anthropocene: Imagining Life Without Nature in Early Modern Literature

full name / name of organization: 
Justin Kolb, Oberlin College
contact email: 
justinbarneskolb@gmail.com

Coined by environmental scientists to describe the current geological epoch, "Anthropocene" denotes an age in which human action has pervasively and irreversibly transformed the land, sea, and atmosphere of the Earth, creating an ecology in which nature cannot be disentangled from artifice.

This concept existed in the minds of early modern writers under other names, especially "the decay of nature," as they imagined a world in which technologies ranging from alchemy to poetics might improve, degrade, or outright replace natural processes.

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