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Women and Work: Claremont Colleges, CA, Nov. 5-6, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, February 1, 2011 - 3:29pm
full name / name of organization: 
Susanne Weil / Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
contact email: 

UPDATE: PAMLA requests that proposals be submitted via their website:
http://www.pamla.org/2011/proposals
If you encounter problems, please email your proposal to sweil@centralia.edu.
Also, please submit any A/V requests with your proposal to ensure that they can be met.

Call for Papers: How do writers represent the work of being women—where "work" is defined broadly to encompass not only paid labor inside and outside the home, but also the work of performing femininity and domesticity? How do writers address social assumptions about who should be performing work, and for what purpose?

"The Power of Stories: Authority and Narrative in Early America" (MCEAS, September 29 - October 1, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 1, 2011 - 1:44pm
full name / name of organization: 
McNeil Center for Early American Studies

*Call for Papers* -- Deadline 3/15/2011

"The Power of Stories: Authority and Narrative in Early America"
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

Hosted by the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, University of Pennsylvania

September 29 – October 1, 2011

[UPDATE] The Outlaw: Trespass, Disfigurement, Domestication [DEADLINE EXTENDED]; SUNY Albany; Wai Chee Dimock +

updated: 
Tuesday, February 1, 2011 - 1:28pm
full name / name of organization: 
University at Albany, SUNY; English Graduate Student Organization
contact email: 

The Outlaw: Trespass, Disfigurement, Domestication

April 1-2, 2011

***SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED: FEBRUARY 14***

Keynote Speaker: Wai Chee Dimock
Creative Keynote Speaker: Doug Rice

"The lyricism of marginality may find inspiration in the image of the "outlaw," the great social nomad, who prowls on the confines of a docile, frightened order." —Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish

Sixth Blackfriars Conference, Staunton, VA (October 25-30, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 1, 2011 - 10:45am
full name / name of organization: 
The American Shakespeare Center

In 2011, the American Shakespeare Center's Education and Research Department will once again host Shakespeareans, scholars and practitioners alike, to explore Shakespeare in the study and Shakespeare on the stage and to find ways that these two worlds – sometime in collision – can collaborate. Past conferences have included such notable scholars as Andrew Gurr, the "godfatASC actor and 2009 Blackfriars Conference presenter: James Keegan as Falstaff in 1H4.her" of the Blackfriars Playhouse, Tiffany Stern, Russ McDonald, Gary Taylor, Stephen Greenblatt, Roz Knutson, Tina Packer, and many more in five days full of activities.

Empathy, Sympathy, and Other Minds (MLA 2012, proposal deadline 3/6/11)

updated: 
Monday, January 31, 2011 - 11:35pm
full name / name of organization: 
Meghan Hammond / New York University
contact email: 

This is a proposed special session for the 2012 MLA convention in Seattle. Empathy and sympathy are capacious terms that have rich and overlapping conceptual histories in philosophy, psychology, aesthetics, and political thought. This panel will explore the ties between empathy/sympathy and the epistemological concerns of literature. What solutions, and problems, do empathy and sympathy introduce to the production of knowledge of the world (especially knowledge of other minds)? What do empathy and sympathy have to do with representational difficulty? How do they influence narrative or poetic innovation? Proposals for papers on any literary period or genre are welcome. Interdisciplinary and cognitive approaches are particularly welcome.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED [February 7] for Composing Live(s) Symposium - March 25, 2011

updated: 
Monday, January 31, 2011 - 2:28pm
full name / name of organization: 
Miami English Graduate Student and Adjunct Association
contact email: 

The 8th Annual Miami University English Graduate Student and Adjunct Association Symposium
Composing Live(s): Writing the Self and the Other within the Disciplines
March 25, 2011, 9:00-4:00 Oxford, Ohio

"To withdraw myself from myself has ever been my sole, my entire, my sincere motive in scribbling at all." —Lord Byron

Writing about lives, writing that lives, or writing that comes to us live from an immediate, connected source shapes how we as scholars and teachers conceive of ourselves and others. Writing works within and out of academia to continually (re)define what is and is not important, what is and is not canonized, and what is and is not ignored within many discourse communities.

[Update] American Identities on Stage: 20th Century American Drama International Conference

updated: 
Sunday, January 30, 2011 - 9:44am
full name / name of organization: 
University of East Anglia, School of American Studies
contact email: 

Celebrating 100 Years of Tennessee Williams (1911-2011)

Location: School of American Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich, U.K. (Arts 2, Room 3.26/3.27)
Date: Saturday, 26 Mar 2011
Keynote Speaker: Professor Stephen Bottoms, Wole Soyinka Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the University of Leeds Leeds, U.K.
Organisers: Dr Nick Selby and Mr Francisco Costa
Institution: University of East Anglia

American Identities on Stage:
20th Century American Drama International Postgraduate Conference

New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities - May 11-13

updated: 
Saturday, January 29, 2011 - 8:15am
full name / name of organization: 
The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference Committee

The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference is accepting abstracts for New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities, the annual conference to be held 11 May to 13 May 2011.

[UPDATE] Special Topics Session: "Productive Silences" (Annual RMMLA Conference October 6-8, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, January 28, 2011 - 3:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pamela J. Rader/ RMMLA 2011 in Scottsdale, AZ

Special Topics Panel: Productive Silences
History and the history-making process, while seeking to remember, often call attention to singularity of perspective, which results in silencing the memories of survivors. Literature then steps in to fill the gaps or the lacuna of silence. In this imaginative, fictional realm, silence and those silenced by historians, dictators, and forgetfulness find agency. Understood as a form of resistance, silence becomes a literary ruse: a voice or a perspective that once lacked agency now finds a place on the page.
Narratives that use ruses of hidden or lost documents (such as letters, journals, and oral testimonies) are particularly interesting.

3rd Annual Graduate and Undergraduate Student Conference on Literature, Rhetoric and Composition - April 1-2, Chattanooga TN

updated: 
Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 11:49am
full name / name of organization: 
Sigma Tau Delta - Xi Alpha chapter and The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

We are welcoming graduate and undergraduate student papers or full panel proposals that address any area of literature (British, American, world, colonial and post-colonial, medieval, modern, contemporary, etc.), rhetoric, composition, or pedagogical studies. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract to xialpha.utc.conference@gmail.com. Submissions must include name, institutional affiliation, student status (graduate or undergraduate), contact information (name, phone number, address, email address), and a list of any audio/visual equipment needed for your presentation. Presentation time should be limited to 20 minutes (usually about ten pages).

Education and Ignorance: the Use of Knowledge in the Medieval World

updated: 
Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 8:54am
full name / name of organization: 
The University of Manchester Medieval Postgraduate Conference

John Rylands Library, Deansgate
Monday 6 - Tuesday 7th June 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS

Modern historiography has often depicted the Middle Ages as a period of ignorance, dogma and superstition– a period in which knowledge stagnated and education was both restricted to a privileged minority and dominated
by the institutional and ideological authority of the Church. From the Carolingian Renaissance and the rise of the medieval universities to the condemnations of heretical teachings and the intellectual and spiritual
ferment of the Reformation, the reality about education and knowledge in the medieval world is undoubtedly far more complex and contested than this picture suggests.

Victorian Medievalisms: Speculum Societatis—A Mirror for Society

updated: 
Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 2:18pm
full name / name of organization: 
BemidjiState University British Studies

The Victorian Age in many ways looked back to the medieval period as a time that was more stable, that embodied ideals to be emulated in the modern world, for examples of sound leadership, orthodox belief and faith, and divinely ordained social structures. These medievalisms took many forms, including Alfredian celebrations, interest in Arthurian romances, neo-Gothic architecture, reforms in the Church, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of knights and ladies, and Count Dracula. The medieval in all its forms was shaped into a mirror by which the Victorians both escaped their own world but also harnessed the old to help form the new world of the 19th century.

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