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Criterion Forum: Haunted Subjects

updated: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 4:20pm
Brigham Young University

For its 2013 issue, Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism anticipates reserving space for up to four essays which explore issues, objects, or persons which, though originating from the repressed past, continue to make themselves "forcibly felt in the present." To provoke thoughts on this topic, Dr. Jayne Elizabeth Lewis, Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine, has provided the following prompt titled "Haunted Subjects." Authors should not attempt to address all of the issues raised by Dr. Lewis; rather, Criterion hopes this prompt will serve as a springboard for creative and well-focused essays on relevant issues and texts.

CFP - Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism (18 January 2013)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 4:04pm
Brigham Young University

Criterion seeks original, well-researched, and intellectually rigorous essays written from diverse critical perspectives and about texts from any time period or literary tradition. Submissions are peer-reviewed by a selection board at BYU, and final decisions are made by the journal's two Editors-in-Chief in consultation with a faculty advisor. Essays may be submitted on a year-round basis, but Criterion is currently soliciting submissions for its 2013 issue, scheduled for publication in April of 2013. The submission deadline for the 2013 issue is 18 January 2013.

The Shape of Things: the Relationship between Creativity and Convention; January 18, 2013.

updated: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:43pm
English Graduate Students Association

The English Graduate School Association at UNCC is pleased to announced its 13th Annual EGSA Conference, which will be held at UNC-Charlotte on January 18, 2013. The EGSA Conference will explore the relationship between freedom and constraint by looking at creativity and conventions in scholarly and creative works.

We seek to discuss some of these questions:

1. What conventions exist in your field of study and why do they exist? How do these
conventions define your field and what types of resistance can be found?

Watermark Journal — Submission Deadline 12/31/2012

updated: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:15pm
California State University, Long Beach

Watermark, an annual scholarly journal published by graduate students in the Department of English at California State University, Long Beach, is now seeking papers for our seventh volume to be published in March 2012. Watermark is dedicated to publishing original critical and theoretical papers concerned with the fields of rhetoric and composition and literature of all genres and periods. As this journal is intended to provide a forum for emerging voices, only student work will be considered.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

Queer London Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 10:24am
Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster

Queer London Conference: Call for Papers

Saturday 23rd March, 2013
Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Matt Cook (Birkbeck College, University of London)

This one-day conference is dedicated to a consideration of London and its role in creating, housing, reflecting and facilitating queer life. It aims to bring together scholars from a variety of different disciplines and backgrounds to consider representations of queer London and how London itself represents queers.

Ireland Past and Present

updated: 
Monday, October 15, 2012 - 2:07pm
American Conference for Irish Studies

ACIS 2013
Chicago, IL

CFP: ATHE Roundtable on Play Anthologies

updated: 
Monday, October 15, 2012 - 1:27pm
Tom Robson & Ara Beal / ATHE Theatre History Focus Group

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS: THEATRE HISTORY ANTHOLOGY ROUNDTABLE

For the 2013 ATHE Conference in Orlando we hope to present a roundtable on what play anthologies people are using while teaching theatre history/dramatic literature survey courses. Many of us teach these survey courses, and we know that the wide range of possible anthologies to adopt can be overwhelming. For that reason we hope to spotlight as many anthologies as possible to generate conversation and provide information to our colleagues.

If you would be interested in participating in this year's Theatre History pedagogy roundtable, please contact me with the following information:

· Name.

· Affiliation.

CFP for Articles: Representations of the Supernatural (2/15/13)

updated: 
Monday, October 15, 2012 - 12:13pm
Supernatural Studies (e-journal)

Supernatural Studies, a new, peer-edited e-journal welcomes submissions for its inaugural issue, Spring 2013. We welcome articles on any aspect of the representation of the supernatural. Complete articles will be due February 15, 2013. Send all correspondence to supernaturalstudies@gmail.com.

Please feel free to send queries and abstracts, as well. Supernatural Studies will be published bi-annually and focus on representations of the supernatural, including (but not limited to) popular culture, history, art, literature, film, and television. We welcome any approach, but request that authors minimize jargon associated with any single-discipline studies.

[UPDATE] Motherhood/Fatherhood and Popular Culture

updated: 
Sunday, October 14, 2012 - 2:59pm
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA) March 27-30, 2013, Washington, DC

I am looking for papers for multiple panels for the PCA/ACA Motherhood/Fatherhood Area on any aspect of motherhood and or fatherhood in popular culture.

Working it Out: A Day of Numbers in Early Modern Writing, Sat. 18 May 2013

updated: 
Sunday, October 14, 2012 - 8:10am
Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London

Early modern books are full of numbers, representing both practicality and mystery. This multidisciplinary conference explores numbers in British early modern literature and textual culture. How were numbers and numerical techniques used in drama, dance, and music? What were the practical issues arising from printing numerical texts, and how were numbers represented on the page? How were the index and the cross-reference created and used? To what extent would an early modern audience recognize mathematical references in literary texts and performance? Who would buy an arithmetic book and how might they use it?

Proposals for papers are invited on, but not confined to, the following subject areas:

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