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Brecht and Benjamin at the Chess Board: Mapping Theatres of Exile

updated: 
Saturday, September 8, 2012 - 1:31pm
AMerican Comparative Literature Association

In his 2012 article "Dramaturgies of Exile", Freddie Rokem writes about Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht's exile in Denmark in the 1930s: together they wrote, dined, discussed theatre and philosophy, and played board games including Go and Chess.  Rokem argues that their game-playing echoed their own personal trajectories of travel and exile, as well as embodied game board mappings of their philosophical and artistic theories.

Call for Submissions: Studies in Popular Culture

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2012 - 5:04pm
Studies in Popular Culture

Studies in Popular Culture, a journal of the Popular Culture Association of the South, publishes articles on popular culture however mediated: through film, literature, radio, television, music, graphics, print, practices, associations, events—any of the material or conceptual conditions of life. Its contributors from the United States, Australia, Canada, China, England, Finland, France, Israel, Scotland, Spain, and the Turkish Republic of North Cyprus include distinguished anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, cultural geographers, ethnomusicologists, historians, and scholars in comics, communications, film, games, graphics, literature, philosophy, religion, and television.

[UPDATE]

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2012 - 12:23pm
Julie Taylor

Proposals are invited for an essay collection on Modernism and Affect, commissioned by Edinburgh University Press. The collection will comprise 10-12 original 7,000 word essays, and aims to present new scholarship in the fields of modernist literature, film, and visual arts emerging in the light of theory's 'affective turn'. The volume will consider the manifold ways in which theories of affect and theories of modernism might speak to one another. How might the reading practices suggested by recent work on the affects inform our critical engagement with modernist texts? How might a focus on affect might allow us to expand our definition of modernism?

Performativity and Secondary Cinematic Authorship - NeMLA, Boston, March 21-24, 2013

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2012 - 8:25am
Tufts University

Classic psychoanalytic film theory relies on two fundamental axioms: 1) That an audience that experiences film spectatorship as a form of voyeurism, and 2) That film characters must be diegetically unaware of their own textual and performative status. But such a framework must be modified with respect to films in which major characters are depicted in the act of manufacturing texts (e.g. Boogie Nights, To Die For, Benny's Video, Waiting for Guffman), and in which these secondary texts are made to supplant the film proper. In such instances, character authors understand precisely that they are operating in a performative capacity.

[UPDATE] Shakespeare at Kalamazoo 2013

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 4:36pm
Kavita Mudan Finn / Shakespeare at Kalamazoo

Shakespeare at Kalamazoo is accepting abstracts for two panels at the 48th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 9-12, 2013).

1. Shakespeare and Material Culture

2. The Merchant of Venice: Pre-texts, Texts, and After-Texts

Traversals of affect/ Traversées d'affect - March 21-23rd, 2013

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 11:26am
Emory University, French Department and Comparative Literature Department

If one is to speak, following the work of Jean-François Lyotard, of the power of the work of art, it is to be located in the gesture that it enacts. The gesture does not belong to the objective properties of the work such that they might be adequately articulated, but rather stands as the "absolutely emotive power of the work," that which "affects sensibility beyond what it can sense." Without being immediately thinkable, the gesture would give rise to thought, demanding it, precisely as thought would be caught unprepared. That is to say that the work of art always involves a certain performance, no less in case of the plastic arts than in others, not as a simple representation, but as through the demand exerted by the unpresentable.

Affect and Identity in Early Modern Performance, NeMLA 2013: Sep 30 deadline

updated: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - 3:40pm
44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), March 21-24, 2013

CFP: Affect and Identity in Early Modern Performance

This panel seeks to explore the potential performative and affective power of early modern drama on group identities. The theater, as locus of communal and social performativity, is a fruitful site to investigate the shaping force of affective response on collective identities and their historical narratives. How does the drama model and orchestrate response, reaction, and construction of identity categories based on age, race, class, gender, religion, nationalism, bodies, or other criteria? Please submit 250-word abstracts to rhizme@gmail.com.

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