Subscribe to RSS - theatre

theatre

CFP for Edited Collection: Unveiling Fashion: Gender, Islam, and Global Modernities (Abstract Deadline: July 31, 2012)

updated: 
Saturday, June 16, 2012 - 8:25pm
Ellorashree Maitra / Nida Sajid

This collection of interdisciplinary essays will trace the historical trajectory of the production, circulation, and consumption of Muslim femininity and fashion from early modernity to the era of transnational globalization. The essays will collectively work through the politics of zenana (feminine) fashion, to unravel how dress and appearance have historically constituted complex, embodied performances of Muslim feminine identity and community in the global arena. Our goal is to investigate the aesthetic and political impact of discourses of modernity in the fashioning of Muslim women's bodies, dress, and lives in multiple geographical sites from the early modern period through the post-9/11 era.

[DEADLINE EXTENDED] Friendship and States of Debt in Early Modern English Literature (Midwest MLA 2012)

updated: 
Friday, June 15, 2012 - 3:13pm
Andrew Kranzman / Michigan State University

This panel examines how discourses of friendship intersect with 'states of debt' in early modern literature and culture. The valence of the term 'state' invokes an array of social relations, conditions, and practices that are doubly compounded through the addition of the term 'debt.' For instance, while 'state' may refer to community, nation, condition, or communicative practices, 'debt' conjures notions of obligation, affective and/or economic bonds, social contracts, oaths, and acts of incorporation or release. Likewise, the connotative richness of 'friend'/'friendship' underscores a variety of intimate, social, and political relationships and responsibilities situated in overlapping networks of kinship, community, and nation.

CFP: A Debt of Gratitude to 1930s Literary America / MMLA 2012 / DUE 07/16

updated: 
Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 12:55pm
Marnie Sullivan, Mercyhurst University

This special section panel seeks to affirm the ongoing relevance of 1930s American culture with papers that provide critical analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama of the period for the 54th Annual M/MLA Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio from November 8-11, 2012. The 1930s is a decade that has had a profound impact shaping American identity. It was a period marked by incomparable contradiction and complexity that saw the depths of an unprecedented economic depression and the elevation of American life into the modern age.

GLOBAL SHAKESPEARE

updated: 
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 - 2:00pm
TBILISI STATE UNIVERSITY

The conference will explore how Shakespeare's work influenced and inspired other works in literature, art, music. The event hopes to unite academics, teachers and students, theatre practitioners and critics, in a series of presentations, roundtables and performances.

Participants from a range of disciplines – English, Drama, Education, Music, Modern Languages, Classics, History, Art and Film are encouraged to participate.
The conference will include an exhibition of books, stage design and theatrical costumes showing the history of Shakespearean studies and performances in Georgia.

"I Viaggiatori nella Penisola Sorrentina - Literature, Arts and Cinema"

updated: 
Tuesday, June 12, 2012 - 2:49am
Department of Modern Philology, University of Naples "Federico II"

The theme of the "journey to Sorrento" represents one of the main fields of investigation in order to analyze the different areas of the famous Peninsula and its peculiarities. Guides, descriptions, memoirs, visual arts, theatrical plays and films, have recorded, through the centuries, its iconic places and its immense cultural and artistic heritage.

Sargasso journal - Agency and Intervention in Caribbean Contexts

updated: 
Monday, June 11, 2012 - 4:40pm
Sargasso a peer-reviewed journal of Caribbean Literature, Language and Culture

This issue seeks scholarship that addresses the varied ways that agency and/or intervention has been engaged, configured, and/or problematized within Caribbean societies, traditions, and cultures. SARGASSO is a peer-reviewed journal published at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras. Of special interest is scholarship that dialogues with ideas in the fields of literature, linguistics, performance/drama, ethnomusicology, anthropology, social sciences, and postcolonial studies; we strongly encourage work that is interdisciplinary in nature.

Corsets and Clockworks: Steampunk and Neo-Victorian Literature and Culture/Deadline 16 July 2012

updated: 
Monday, June 11, 2012 - 12:54pm
Midwest Modern Language Association/Cincinnati, OH, November 8-11, 2012

Steampunk and Neo-Victorian Literature are widely read and written in contemporary popular culture. While these genres are not new, they have become ever more accessible to mainstream audiences through such works as Alan Moore's The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, the Parasol Protectorate Series by Gail Carriger, Kady Cross's Steampunk Chronicles, and Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan Series. Steampunk has also become a movement, much like its Gothic brother, in its own right by celebrating Victoriana through fashion, writing and art. This panel seeks to investigate ways in which Steampunk and Neo-Victorian Literature are impacting current trends in literature, art, and fashion.

Essays for journal - languague, literacy, literature, culture and/or English teaching

updated: 
Monday, June 11, 2012 - 11:41am
Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education

The editors seek articles concerned with English language, literacy and literature teaching worldwide as well as essays on literature and culture that do not specifically address teaching.

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education is an established journal (published by Routledge/Taylor & Francis) for English teachers at all levels, including college and university, which encourages international dialogue between teachers and researchers on issues surrounding literacy, language, literature and culture. In particular, Changing English considers the future of English as a subject in the context of its history and the scope for development and change.

Pages