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[UPDATE] Deadline Extended until 15 June for The Maginalised Mainstream: Literature, Culture, and Popularity, 8-9 November 2012

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 3:26pm
Institute of English Studies, University of London; Goldsmiths College, University of Exeter

The Marginalised Mainstream addresses popular culture and its role in cultural production in the long twentieth century, especially under-valued and under-researched areas of the mainstream.

Keynote speakers: Professor Phillip Tew (Brunel University), Professor Christoph Lindner (University of Amsterdam), Professor James Chapman (University of Leicester), and Professor Nicola Humble (Roehampton University)

'Texts are always sites of evaluative struggle between the "high" and the "low", whatever the presumed hierarchical positioning of their overall domain.' (Léon Hunt)

"Renaissance Que(e)ries: Un-disciplining the early modern body"

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 11:44am
NeMLA 2013

In the recent anthology Shakesqueer (2011), Madhavi Menon claims, "Reading Shakespeare as queer rather than queered challenges the rule of chronology and identity that has thus far kept his poems and plays from exercising queer agency." This panel takes up Menon's urge to reconsider the relationship between queer theory and the early modern, welcoming papers that read early modern literature, both Shakespeare and beyond, as a body of queer texts, rather than historically distant productions at which we might look through a contemporary queer lens.

"Debts to the Moor: Citations of Shakespeare's Othello" Deadline 07/02/2012

Sunday, May 27, 2012 - 12:38pm
Midwest MLA Convention, November 8-11, 2012, Theme: Debt

Debts to the Moor: Influences, Adaptations, and Citations of Shakepeare's Othello

This panel invites theoretical inquiry and/or performance analyses of appropriations of William Shakespeare's Othello in film, popular culture and/or foreign non-English adaptations. Some questions to consider are: What methodologies are employed when considering the expectations of local audiences producing and consuming the adaptation? What contextual influences inform the reiteration of Othello in a range of performance venues? What literary debts are acknowledged when Othello is cited in popular culture, in widely distributed English films, and/or in foreign performances for non-English speaking audiences?

Polari Journal (queer writing)

Friday, May 25, 2012 - 9:19pm
Polari Journal

Call for Submission Extended AGAIN

Due to unforseen circumstances, the April issue of Polari Journal will now be published in mid August 2012. As a result, the open call for submissions has been extended further (see below).

Polari Journal of queer writing is holding an open call for submissions for its next issue (published August 2012). There is no specific theme for this issue; however Polari tends towards the shorter forms: short stories, poetry, essays, scholarly papers, one act plays/scripts and reviews. In general, the word limit for fiction, plays and essays is 6000 words. Reviews should not be more than 1500 words. For poetry, the maximum is 100 lines.

At this time financial remuneration is not offered.

[UPDATE] Call for Papers - Why Comparative Literature - ICLA, 2013

Friday, May 25, 2012 - 10:31am
International Comparative Literature Association

The loose boundaries of comparative literature have continuously raised questions about the scholarly value and practical use of the field. This seminar proposes to explore the significance of comparative literature as academic discipline where the worth of global literatures in the field of humanities is persistently challenged by the pragmatic orientation of public opinion.

Zombies: Walking, Eating & Performance / proposals 20 November 2012 / conference 13 April 2013

Tuesday, May 22, 2012 - 1:35pm
Roberta Mock / Plymouth University

Zombies: Walking, Eating & Performance
13 April 2013
hosted by the Theatre & Performance Department,
Plymouth University (UK)

The purpose of this one-day symposium is to explore, interrogate and celebrate zombies as a cultural phenomenon through the paradigms of performance, as well as models of performance through the quintessential zombie activities of eating and walking. It will examine the zombie as protagonist, performer, nomad, pilgrim, traveller, tourist, nightmare, underclass and demonstrator. Zombies: Walking, Eating and Performance will consider the derided and resilient figure of the zombie as metaphor and character; the zombie as vehicle for protest and for public self-expression.