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"The End?": International Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference at Indiana University 3/25-3/27

updated: 
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 10:50am
International Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference at Indiana University

We are issuing a Call for Proposals for scholarly and creative submissions for an International Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference entitled "The End?" to be held at Indiana University in Bloomington from March 25th-27th, 2010.

Bookends, happy endings, at wits' end, means to an end, split ends, making ends meet… the list could go on. We imagine the end in endless ways when we think about our languages, our cultures, our disciplines, our arts, and ourselves. What sort of ends are we at, or fast approaching? What ends have we passed? When we structure our thinking around an ending, do we imply a certain teleology? Do we point to a moment of division or rupture? Do we ask about a new beginning?

"Mediated Memory: Of Monuments, Machines and Madeleines," Glasgow, UK. CFP abstract submission deadline: 25 Nov 2009

updated: 
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 10:27am
Graduate School of Arts and Humanities, University of Glasgow, UK

Call for Papers: 'Mediated Memory: Of Monuments, Machines and Madeleines'
Symposium, 29 January 2010, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom.
http://www.gla.ac.uk/departments/hatii/news/callforpapersmediatedmemoryo...

****** Deadline for submission: 25 November 2009 ******

Sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council's "Beyond Text" programme, http://www.beyondtext.ac.uk/SLI.shtml

2010 American Studies Association of Turkey Conference: The Art of Language

updated: 
Friday, November 6, 2009 - 5:37am
American Studies Association of Turkey

American Studies Association of Turkey
34th International American Studies Conference

The Art of Language: Cultural Expressions in American Studies

November 3–5, 2010
Alanya, Turkey

Confirmed Speakers:
Shirley Geok-Lin Lim
Cherrie Moraga
Celia Herrera Rodriguez

Solitude and Sociability in the Eighteenth Century, Salt Lake City (2/25-2/27/10) (Update)

updated: 
Thursday, November 5, 2009 - 4:04pm
SCSECS

The deadline for paper proposals for SCSECS annual conference in Salt Lake City on Feb. 25-27 has been extended to Dec. 1. Proposals can be sent directly to brett_mcinelly@byu.edu or to panel organizers. See http://www.scsecs.net/scsecs/2010/cfp.html for a full list of panels. The conference theme is "Solitude and Sociability." Felicity Nussbaum of UCLA and Kevin Cope of LSU will be the plenary speakers.

Genre Dynamics: Exchange and Transformation--A Seminar/Panel at ACLA 2010 (New Orleans April 1-4), subm. deadline, Nov. 13, 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 10:52pm
Mark A. Cantrell, Shepherd U; Chad J. Loewen-Schmidt, Shepherd U

As conceptual categories that both derive from and frame our understanding of particular works, genres are determined largely by what Ludwig Wittgenstein calls "family resemblances" rather than by particular qualities that all works in a given genre necessarily share. While ambiguities at the periphery of genres produce hybrid forms like the prose poem or collage, even works at the center of a genre are shaped by disputes at its edges. For example, one could argue that the growing popularity of the novel as a chief means of narrative expression at the end of the eighteenth century urged poets to re-conceive the fundamental features of their art, thereby shaping the conventions of Romantic poetry.

Transnational Feminist Responses and the Torture of "Enemies"

updated: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 10:06pm
Basuli Deb/University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Call for Papers

American Comparative Literature Association Annual Meeting
April 1-4, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana

Deadline for a 250 word paper proposal: 13 Nov. 2009
(to be submitted through the ACLA website at http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php)

Transnational Feminist Responses and the Torture of "Enemies"

In "Beyond Terror: Gender, Narrative, and Human Rights" Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg underlines:

Gossip, gospel, and governance: orality in Europe 1400-1700

updated: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 12:29pm
Alex Cowan / Northumbria University, UK

The aim of the conference is to explore the spoken word and its power in a broad range of various contexts:
Street life (orality in any European urban context 1400-1700); Reading aloud (using the lectern for dissemination of written text in convents and monasteries, public proclamation of misdemeanour and laws, 1400-1700);Teaching and learning in University schools 1400-1700; Declamation and discourse in Parliament; Incantation and magic; Performance (theatre, court poetry, poetry competitions);Preaching (history of the preaching orders, biographies of preachers; Parley and discourse of war; Women's speech

Cultures of Migration: Local Cosmopolitanisms

updated: 
Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 4:23am
American Comparative Literature Association

ACLA (New Orleans, Apr. 1-4, 2010)
Cultures of Migration: Local Cosmopolitanisms

Immigrant communities have often been depicted as either inward-looking, focused on preserving cultural practices from the "old country" or outward-looking, intent on fitting into the new "host" country. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition that "immigrant" communities are often also migrant communities, with complex social and travel networks between their country of origin, their new country of residence and sometimes third and fourth countries where their offspring choose to live. This panel invites papers that investigate how these complex patterns are reflected in creative works of literature, film, theater or music.

Turning Points and Transformations (Deadline Extended)

updated: 
Monday, November 2, 2009 - 2:59pm
Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

http://english.louisiana.edu/laconference/Home/index.php

The Louisiana Conference invites papers and creative work on the effects of transformative moments and experiences—textual, cultural and academic. Topics might include but are not limited to: effects of historical and political crises on literature and culture; revolutions; linguistic transformations; bodily transformations; religious conversions; personal turningpoints in autobiographies, literary characters, academic careers, etc.; genre transformations; texts into film; dissertation into book; academic turning points.

Guidelines for Submission:

Framing the Human: (De)humanization in Language Literature and Culture - March 6, 2010

updated: 
Monday, November 2, 2009 - 1:29pm
University Of Minnesota, Twin Cities Association of Graduate Students in Romance Studies

Debates around how "the human" is defined, interrogated and regulated often delineate boundaries that separate the human and its others (e.g. the animal, the divine, the monstrous). Far from being abstract exercises in taxonomy, assessments of these boundaries impose ways of knowing, reading and seeing. Political, ideological, scientific, religious and economic regimes participate in framing the human. Determining who or what counts as human under these regimes has profound consequences. For example, one can be biologically but not politically human (e.g. undocumented workers). One's political "human-ness" can be stripped away or called into question after certain violations of the law (e.g. enemy combatants).

Cultures of Differences: National / Indigenous / Historical, May 24 to 30, 2010

updated: 
Monday, November 2, 2009 - 10:06am
International Association for Philosophy and Literature

The International Association for Philosophy and Literature will be hosted from May 24 to 30, 2010 by the University of Regina in Saskatchewan, Canada. The conference theme is "Cultures of Differences: National / Indigenous / Historical". The final deadline for applications is approaching (November 7), but inquiries may be directed to Dr Hugh Silverman at execdir@iapl.info or Dr Lynn Wells at wellsl@uregina.ca We welcome proposals for individual papers and for organized sessions.

[UPDATE] Modernism and Utopia: Convergences in the Arts; 23-24 April 2010

updated: 
Sunday, November 1, 2009 - 6:17pm
Nathan Waddell / University of Birmingham

NEW PLENARY SPEAKER: DARKO SUVIN

Modernism and Utopia: Convergences in the Arts

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Doug Mao, Johns Hopkins University
Patrick Parrinder, University of Reading
Darko Suvin, McGill University

Proposals are invited for 20-minute conference presentations that consider modernism in relation to utopia and utopianism, in written, visual, aural, and plastic media.

The aim of the conference is to encourage debate between and across disciplines with a focus on the varied historical, cultural, technological, and intellectual settings in which the modernism/utopia nexus might be clarified and explained.

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