Subscribe to theatre

theatre

Allegory: States of the Art: proposals May 10, 2009; RSA, Venice, April 8-10, 2010

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 4:21pm
Allegory: States of the Art in Early Modernity; Renaissance Society of America: Venice, April 8

Allegory: States of the Art

This panel will explore approaches, old and new, to early modern allegory, welcoming a wide range of national, historical, and aesthetic instances. Potential topics might include (among others): allegory and the making of states (Venetian or otherwise); allegory and the idea of the human (or non-human); time, space, and allegory; allegory and the baroque; allegory: postmodern and/or early modern; allegory and economy; religious allegory.

Abstracts and a brief bio/cv due by May 10. A longer initial abstract will work but final abstracts accepted for the panel must be 150 words.

Send submissions or questions to Joseph Campana (jac4@rice.edu).

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 2:32pm
Nicole Herrera/ University of Akron

Cultural Consequences of Unmotherhood

Scholars in the fields of Anthropology, Biology, Cultural Studies, Economics, English, Gender Studies, History, Medicine, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Women's Studies, and others are engaged in attempting to understand the construction and consequences of motherhood. A woman's physiological ability to conceive, carry, and birth children, the assumption that the ability to raise children is a natural physiological trait, the ideological pressures to do so, the unique duties and responsibilities of motherhood, and subsequent rewards and penalties are just a few of the areas of inquiry found in literature.

"The Future ain't what it used to be" - PROPOSALS: MAY 15th 2009 / CONFERENCE: 17th JUNE 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 1:05pm
The Future ain't what it used to be: Interactions of Past, Present and Future in Literature and Visual Media - Postgraduate Conference

"The Future ain't what it used to be" is the seventh annual Postgraduate Conference held by the English Programme, University of Dundee. It will investigate questions such as: how have perspectives of the future changed over time, how is the future perceived in literature and the media today, and how do representations of the past help us to imagine the future? Proposals should be 300 words long, for papers lasting 20 minutes. The deadline for proposals is 15th May 2009.

For more information contact Laura Findlay (l.f.findlay@dundee.ac.uk), or go to www.dundee.ac.uk/english/index.htm

REA: A Journal of Religion, Education and the Arts

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 9:51am
Mater Dei Institute of Education

REA: A Journal of Religion, Education and the Arts invites contributions for its forthcoming issue to be published online in December 2009. Research in the areas of religion or theology, education or the humanities will be considered for publication and contributors are also welcome to submit multi or inter-disciplinary articles that span more than one of these areas.

Articles should be 5-6,000 words and should conform to the Harvard author-date referencing system. The closing date for submissions is September 1st, 2009. Please send your article and a short abstract of 200 words to the following email address: paula.murphy@materdei.dcu.ie

Book reviews are also welcome.

Dramas of Life in the Renaissance

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 2:45pm
Lloyd Kermode/ California State University Long Beach Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Update to listing:

Conference details were omitted from the earlier CFP:

Conference: Renaissance Society of America conference
Venice, Italy, 8-10 April 2010

Previous CFP:

Why has human society consistently incorporated drama into its sense of self and community? Why do people want to watch other people "playing out" scenarios in history and fiction. Why are people compelled to live out stories and explain themselves and their relations to other people, places, and objects in dramatic ways? Where do we draw the line in historiography, theater history, art and literary studies between "drama" and the "dramatic" - between official play and the merely playful?

CFP: Translation, Performance and Reception of Greek Drama, 1900-1950: International Dialogues. Comparative Drama Special Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, April 7, 2009 - 1:36pm
Amanda Wrigley



Proposals are invited for essays on the translation, performance and reception of ancient Greek drama in the period between and around the two world wars—so, very broadly speaking 1900-1950.

Essays which have an international focus or dimension are particularly encouraged: for example, discussions of translations and adaptations which engage with international politics; considerations of intercontinental trends in Greek play performance; or essays on the various receptions of internationally touring productions (such as Max Reinhardt's Oedipus, 1910-12, Harley Granville-Barker and Lillah McCarthy's Amercian tour of Trojan Women and Iphigenia in Tauris, 1915).

European Shakespeares and Asia - 31 May 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 6, 2009 - 5:10pm
Alexander Huang / Penn State University

Local/Global Shakespeares: 4th British Shakespeare Association Conference

King's College London & Shakespeare's Globe
11 – 13 September 2009

Seminar: Asian Shakespeares in Europe

[EXTENDED DEADLINE] Bibliography and Textual Studies at SCMLA 2009

updated: 
Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 9:56pm
South Central Modern Language Association

SCMLA Annual Conference in Baton Rouge, LA.
October 29-31, 2009

Deadline: April 8, 2009

The Bibliography and Textual Criticism panel at SCMLA welcomes 15 minute
papers related to:

Textual Studies
Bibliography
History of the Book
Authorship
Rare Books
Pedagogy
Paratextuality
Media Studies
E-texts

And any other permutation thereof.

Please send 300 word abstracts to lasquires_at_mail.utexas.edu. no later than
April 9, 2009.

Dramas of Life in the Renaissance

updated: 
Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 8:40pm
Lloyd Kermode / California State University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Why has human society consistently incorporated drama into its sense of self and community? Why do people want to watch other people "playing out" scenarios in history and fiction? Why are people compelled to live out stories and explain themselves and their relations to other people, places, and objects in dramatic ways? Where do we draw the line in historiography, theater history, art and literary studies between "drama" and the "dramatic" - between official play and the merely playful?

International Multidisciplinary Women's Congress (October 13-16, 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 5, 2009 - 3:10pm
Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Izmir, TURKEY

Please, note that abstracts of 300 words will be submitted electronically at our website at http://www.imwc2009.org. Deadline for submission of proposals is June 1, 2009.

The IMWC will take place at the Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey between October 13th and 16th, 2009 and the overarching theme for the Congress will be "Change and Empowerment."

The aim of the Congress is to foster communication and collaboration between academicians and to open up a discussion platform for the analysis, development, and exchange of ideas on the following Women-related main topics:

Edited Volume: Harvey Milk and Queer Politics (30/07/09)

updated: 
Saturday, April 4, 2009 - 11:46pm
Edited Volume

The Queer Politics of Harvey Milk: An Edited Collection

"If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door."

- Harvey Milk, "In Case" [Audio Tape]: 1977

"Harvey's life was theater."

- Anne Kronenberg, Oscars interview: 2009

Pages