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HORROR AREA Call for Papers, 2012 PCA/ACA National Conference - Boston, MA - 11-14 April, 2012

updated: 
Monday, October 10, 2011 - 8:42am
Popular Culture Association (PCA) / American Culture Association (ACA)

HORROR
(in fiction, film, television, new media, theory and culture)

2012 NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE POPULAR CULTURE / AMERICAN CULTURE ASSOCIATIONS

The Horror Area co-chairs of the Popular Culture Association invite interested scholars to submit papers on any aspect of horror in fiction, cinema, television, gaming, theory and culture for the 2011 PCA/ACA National Convention to be held at the Copley Marriott Hotel in Boston, MA. The conference runs from 11 to 14 April, 2012.

Horror Co-Chairs:
Dr. James Iaccino, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL
Dr. Carl Sederholm, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Kristopher Woofter, Concordia University, Montréal, QC

6th Global Conference: Visual Literacies (July 2012, Oxford, United Kingdom)

updated: 
Monday, October 10, 2011 - 8:26am
Dr. Rob Fisher/ Inter-Disciplinary.Net

6th Global Conference
Visual Literacies

Tuesday 3rd July 2012 – Thursday 5th July 2012
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for Papers:

This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues surrounding visual literacy in regard to theory and praxis. Perspectives are sought from those engaged in fields such as education, visual arts, fine arts, literature, philosophy, psychology, critical theory and theology. These disciplines are indicative only as papers are welcomed from any area, profession and vocation in which visual literacy plays a part.

Papers, reports, work-in-progress and workshops are invited on issues related to any of the following themes;

Hybrid Irelands: March 29-31, 2012 (Abstracts due November 15th, 2011)

updated: 
Monday, October 10, 2011 - 5:33am
Hybrid Irelands: At Culture’s Edge / University of Notre Dame / Keough-Naughton Institute

Hybrid Irelands: At Culture's Edge (Abstracts due November 15th, 2011)

A Graduate-Student Conference Exploring the Relationship between Hybridity and Irish Literature

Place: University of Notre Dame
Date: March 29-31, 2012
Keynote Speakers: Terry Eagleton (University of Lancaster, University of Notre Dame)
David Lloyd (University of Southern California)
Clair Wills (Queen Mary, University of London)
Poetry Reading: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill
Medbh McGuckian (tentative) (Queen's University, Belfast)

[UPDATE] Enunciating the End: The Apocalypse, Textual Futures, and What Comes Next

updated: 
Sunday, October 9, 2011 - 11:45pm
Concordia English Graduate Colloquium

Apocalyptic prophecies and futurist narratives have always had a special place in culture, from Y2K fervor to the periodically updated Rapture to the upcoming end of the Mayan calendar in December of 2012. In addition to the "real" end-of-the-world predictions, and perhaps in response to them, our literature and pop culture has spawned innumerable fictions of a future unaccounted for. This unknown future folds back upon our past through historical representations of colonialism's reconfiguration of territory, ownership, and identity. In the present, our cultural climate seems to speak to the end of the material world as we have come to understand it, as we transcend print-based media and move up into the digital media cloud.

[UPDATE] Ethnic Lit & Religion at MELUS 2012 (April 19-22)

updated: 
Sunday, October 9, 2011 - 9:34pm
J. Stephen Pearson, U of Tennessee

Submissions are still being accepted for two panels on Ethnic Literature and Religion for the next MELUS conference: one on religious transnationalism and one on Eastern religions.

1) Eastern Religions in Ethnic U.S. Literatures

Papers should discuss depictions of or references to Eastern religious traditions (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, etc.) in ethnic U.S. texts.

Topics of interest include (but are certainly not limited to):

Reshaping Change: The Language and Literature of Opportunity (ACLA 2012)

updated: 
Friday, October 7, 2011 - 4:35pm
American Comparative Literature Association, Brown University, March 29 - April 1 2012

Aristotle's Poetics defines complex action in tragedy as a change accompanied by reversal or recognition, or both. Given this definition, is change then not a requirement of literature? Even in the Nouveau Roman, change is provided by an unexpected outlook and by stylistic choices in the writing itself. Change is often and legitimately equated to crisis or catastrophe, but may also be seen as a critical element of Literature–in Aristotle's view inherently so. A literary work develops through change, its interpretation by character or reader, and is thus assumed into or by the narrative. The imagination is fed by change. This seminar investigates how literary works represent change in a way that reinterprets or avoids catastrophe.

Enunciating the End: The Apocalypse, Textual Futures, and What Comes Next

updated: 
Friday, October 7, 2011 - 12:30pm
Concordia English Graduate Colloquium

Apocalyptic prophecies and futurist narratives have always had a special place in culture, from Y2K fervor to the periodically updated Rapture to the upcoming end of the Mayan calendar in December of 2012. In addition to the "real" end-of-the-world predictions, and perhaps in response to them, our literature and pop culture has spawned innumerable fictions of a future unaccounted for. This unknown future folds back upon our past through historical representations of colonialism's reconfiguration of territory, ownership, and identity. In the present, our cultural climate seems to speak to the end of the material world as we have come to understand it, as we transcend print-based media and move up into the digital media cloud.

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