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Performer Politicians and Politician Performers: From Artist to Activist and Activist to Artist

Friday, September 9, 2011 - 3:50pm
Association for Theatre in Higher Education, Theatre History Focus Group

I am seeking possible co-panelists for a proposed panel to be sponsored by the Theatre History Focus Group for the 2012 Association for Theatre in Higher Education Conference. With the conference theme of "Performance as/is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate" I find myself thinking about historical instances of performers who have crossed over onto the political stage, or political figures who found second careers for themselves as actors. How did the first chapter of the career impact the second? Were there echoes of the political agenda in the performance work? Did the performance work contradict the ideology represented in their political careers?

[REMINDER] "Rethinking Seneca's Influence on Early Modern Drama" (09/30/2011; NEMLA, Rochester NY: 03/15-18)

Friday, September 9, 2011 - 12:25pm
Nicola Imbracsio/ University of New Hampshire

For years, scholars have demonstrated the debt that Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and other playwrights owe to Seneca's work. Such foundational criticism has often pointed to Seneca's plot devices, characterization, language, and form that inspired later Renaissance dramatists. However, recent scholarship demonstrates Seneca's effect on early modern subject construction and performance conditions. This panel aims to continue and extend current reconsiderations of Seneca's influence on early modern drama by gathering papers that "rethink" Seneca's works and influence in light of feminist, queer, post-colonial, and materialist theoretical perspectives.

In Analysis: The Work of Hanif Kureishi

Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:22pm
University of Roehampton, London (UK)

The University of Roehampton presents
Friday, 24 and Saturday, 25 February 2012


Speakers include:

Hanif Kureishi in conversation and reading from Work in Progress

Susie Thomas (author of Hanif Kureishi: A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism)

[REMINDER] The Apocalypse in Literature and Film - October 1, 2011

Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:15pm
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

American Association of Australasian Literary Studies Annual Conference - Toronto - Feb. 17-19, 2012

Thursday, September 8, 2011 - 2:01pm
American Association of Australasian Literary Studies (AAALS)

The AAALS calls for papers for its 28th Annual conference to be held in conjunction with ANSZANA in Toronto, ON from February 17 to 19, 2012. As always, the conference will be collegial and open-minded, welcoming papers from many different approaches and contexts. Connections involving any combination of Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the US will be welcomed. We also are especially interested in papers on Indigenous Australian literature and Maori literature. Welcome as well will be papers dealing with Patrick White, whose centennial is in 2012 and who is in the midst of an exciting reconsideration.

[UPDATE] NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Call for papers - Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Nov

Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 3:50pm
Kathleen Alves/City University of New York

**Abstracts sent to the has been lost. Please resend immediately to the alternative emails above**

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.