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[UPDATE] "DESIRE: FROM EROS TO EROTICISM" NOVEMBER 10-11, 2011

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:50pm
CUNY Graduate Center (Comparative Literature Department)

CUNY Graduate Center (365 5th Avenue, New York, New York)
November 10-11, 2011

Desire: From Eros to Eroticism
Keynote Speakers: Peter Brooks &David Konstan

Chaos: Transformative Power, Antagonistic Liberator and Threatening Master

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:33pm
More than Thought- A Scholarly Literary Journal Devoted to Consciousness

Chaos has long been a tormentor as much as a liberator. In addition, it has been a master by way of intimidation and fostering dread. The great fear of the unknown has terrorized many a person into submitting to comfort in a cage. The exploration of chaos and its relationship to consciousness may yield fruitful results as the absence of structure and order has the potential to give to a new worldview. What kind of relationship does chaos have with the development of consciousness? How does literature present chaos and its effect on consciousness? Whatever the conclusions, it is likely to prove rich and abundant for furthering human understanding.

Eastern Religions in Ethnic U.S. Literatures (MELUS, April 19-22, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:10pm
J. Stephen Pearson, U of Tennessee

Submissions are being accepted for a panel that discusses depictions of or references to Eastern religious traditions (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, etc.) in ethnic U.S. texts.

Topics of interest include (but are certainly not limited to):

~ how religious traditions, beliefs and practices are altered for a U.S. context
~ how they assist and/or interfere with the process of Americanization
~ how they promote and/or hinder community identity
~ how they are viewed by people from other traditions
~ etc.

Religious Transnationalism in Ethnic U.S. Literatures (MELUS, April 19-22, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:01pm
J. Stephen Pearson, U of Tennessee

Given the connection between many religions to specific geographical locations outside of the United States (for example: Jerusalem, Rome, Mecca, the Ganges, Tepeyac, etc.), religious practice can be seen as a common and powerful means of transnational experience in the U.S.

Submissions are being accepted for a panel that discusses depictions of or references to such transnational aspects of religious practice and/or belief (from any tradition) within ethnic U.S. texts.

Send a 1-page abstract by Sunday, 16 October to Dr. J. Stephen Pearson (U of Tennessee, Knoxville) at stpears11@gmail.com . Panelists will be notified by the 23rd of October.

CFP: Theatre & Performance Studies, Abstracts Due 12/1/11

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2011 - 12:39am
33rd Annual SWTX PCA/ACA Conference

Panels are now being formed on topics related to Theatre & Performance Studies in its various forms and approaches. This new Special Topics Area to SWTX PCA/ACA encourages dialogue between varied fields of performance scholarship (i.e., performance studies; theatre, dance, and cultural studies; as well as queer and post-colonial theory), and exploration of critiques of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, technology, and nation. Papers across performance modes, cultural contexts, and historical periods are welcomed. Topics might include but are not limited to:

Intellectual Disability in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2012)

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 12:09pm
47th International Congress on Medieval Studies (Special Session)

Call for papers: Intellectual Disability in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This special session will take place at the 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 10-13, 2012).

International Folkloristics Series, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:54am
Dundes, Alan (founding editor) / Mieder, Wolfgang (series editor); Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

This series, originally founded by Alan Dundes and edited by Wolfgang Mieder, includes theoretical studies of any genre or aspect of folklore. The series welcomes individually authored and collaboratively authored books, monographs, collections of data, bibliographies, and Festschriften of at least 40,000 words. The emphasis will be on analytic and methodological innovations in the consideration of myth, folktale, legend, superstition, proverb, riddle, folksong, festival, game or any other form of folklore as well as any of the interpretative approaches to folklore topics.

For inquiries or to submit proposals/manuscripts please contact Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor, caitlinl@plang.com

Writing and dramatising the body : violence, discordance and reconfiguration in English-language literature and drama

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 4:17am
Université Charles de Gaulle - Lille 3 (Lille, France)

Should violence be considered as one of the experiences the body undergoes in literature or as an ordeal which elicits the very question of what this body is – a body which is mapped in language and speech. As a result of the violence that it undergoes, inflicts or self-inflicts, the body grapples with something which is not simply outside itself: it discovers its own foreignness, its own discordance. It rebelliously slips through the categories in which one attempts to contain it, but it also defies the biological body to which it cannot be reduced. What does a body do when, for no apparent reason, it breaks, splits, is pulled asunder, petrified? What happens when the part usurps the whole or the whole body is reduced to nothing, mere refuse?

[Update]: CFP - The Apocalypse in Literature and Film (October 1, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 8:32pm
The journal _LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

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