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[Update]: CFP - The Apocalypse in Literature and Film (October 1, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 8:32pm
The journal _LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

Anthology on The Book of Mormon Musical, abstracts Nov 1.

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 7:20pm
Marc E. Shaw / Hartwick College; Holly Welker / Writer & editor

The official reaction of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to The Book of Mormon, the musical from Matt Stone and Trey Parker of South Park and Robert Lopez of Avenue Q, consists of a single sentence: "The production may attempt to entertain audiences for an evening, but the The Book of Mormon as a volume of scripture will change people's lives forever by bringing them closer to Christ."

But the musical has done much more than merely attempt to entertain people for an evening: it regularly brings audiences to their feet in a wild ovation at its end, and it earned a whopping 14 Tony nominations, winning in nine of the categories it was nominated in, including "Best Musical."

Journal - Studies in American Culture

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 4:26pm
STUDIES IN AMERICAN CULTURE

Call for Submissions

Studies in American Culture welcomes the submission of essays on all aspects of American culture, including studies of the literature, language, visual arts, and history of the United States, and from all scholarly and critical approaches.

The Editorial Board welcomes studies of art, music, theatre, political science, sociology, literature, history, or any other area related to American Studies. We will consider any essay that explores an interesting dimension of American culture but are particularly eager to see submissions that approach their subjects from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Our diverse readership includes academics and non-academics from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds.

Paradoxes of the threshold : literature, place and the environment in 19th-21st century literatures 25-26 october 2012

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 3:07am
Université de Louvain (Belgium)

Human beings continuously experience the threshold space between what separates them from and what connects them with the world. Literature and theatre have never ceased to question this dimension, which fore and foremost involves words, discourses and representations. Immersed in their environment, human subjects however maintain with the latter a relationship that is fundamentally problematic, as exemplified in the multiplicity of forms this relationship can take.

BSECS 41st Annual Conference (proposals due soon!)

updated: 
Thursday, September 1, 2011 - 12:23pm
British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

*online submission and registration is now open*

BRITISH SOCIETY FOR EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES
41st Annual Conference

January 4-6, 2012

St Hugh's College, Oxford, U.K

'Landscapes & Environments '

The annual meeting of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies is Europe's largest and most prestigious annual conference dealing with all aspects of the history, literature, and culture of the long eighteenth century.

CSA 2012 Panel: (Re)membering the historical "monster"

updated: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 6:59pm
Erin DeYoung (Trinity College Dublin) and Sarah Jo Mayville (UCSD)

This year's theme, "Culture Matters," calls for proposals that critically and creatively reflect on culture and "the material" broadly conceived. How do we theorize the relationship between culture and materiality? In what ways might interdisciplinary formations such as ethnic studies, critical gender studies, queer theory, indigenous studies, and new media studies challenge or redefine notions of the material? How should cultural critics understand the material in relationship to the immaterial? What are the cultural-material aspects of knowledge production both inside and outside the university? How does culture become a material force and how can cultural critics and producers intervene in or transform institutions and material practices?

New Voices, a Graduate English Conference Bodies of Influence: The Human Body in the Humanities and Sciences

updated: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 5:41pm
New Voices, Georgia State University

Call for Papers
New Voices, a Graduate English Conference
Bodies of Influence: The Human Body in the Humanities and Sciences
Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
October 20‐22, 2011 

Keynote Speaker: Marilynn Richtarik, Associate Professor of 20th‐Century British and Irish 
Literature and author of a critical biography of playwright Stewart Parker, forthcoming from 
Oxford University Press. 

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