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"Rethinking Seneca's Influence on Early Modern Drama" (09/30/2011; NEMLA, Rochester NY: 03/15-18)

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 11:26am
Nicola Imbracsio/ University of New Hampshire

For years, scholars have demonstrated the debt that Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and other playwrights owe to Seneca's work. Such foundational criticism has often pointed to Seneca's plot devices, characterization, language, and form that inspired later Renaissance dramatists. However, recent scholarship demonstrates Seneca's effect on early modern subject construction and performance conditions. This panel aims to continue and extend current reconsiderations of Seneca's influence on early modern drama by gathering papers that "rethink" Seneca's works and influence in light of feminist, queer, post-colonial, and materialist theoretical perspectives.

RSA 2012 Proposed Panel: Disgust in Early Modern English Literature

Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 9:53pm
Natalie K. Eschenbaum / University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

This proposed RSA 2012 (Washington, DC) panel is interested in examining how and why early modern English individuals experienced repulsion, and how and why they expressed this repulsion in poetry, plays, and prose. The study of disgust in early modern literature is essential and overdue. As other disciplines (e.g. anthropology, psychology, history) have discovered, to be disgusted is to be human, and to be disgusted in certain ways, by certain things, is to identify with a particular culture. By studying the ways in which disgust manifests itself in early modern literature, we will better understand early modern culture.

Historicizing Performance in the Early Modern Period, January 20, 2012, The John Rylands Library, Deansgate, Manchester

Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 11:28am
Michael Durrant and Naya Tsentourou / The University of Manchester

This one-day academic conference aims to bring together scholars working on all aspects of performance in the early modern period (taken broadly to include the fifteenth to the early eighteenth centuries). We intend to interrogate what performance and its related terminologies and practices might have meant to early modern readers, playgoers, and congregations; how performance shaped and/or undermined distinctions between private/public bodies and selves. Although drama is an essential point of reference for this discussion, we encourage that "historicizing performance" be taken as broadly as possible. Topics might include (but are not limited to):
- Plays and play-going
- Music and singing

CFP: Queer Places, Practices, and Lives conference (May 18-19, 2012; abstracts due Aug. 12, 2011)

Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 10:36am
Ohio State University


The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH

May 18-19, 2012

Deadline for proposals: Aug. 12, 2011

Confirmed speakers:
Joseph Boone, Tim Dean, Kale Fajardo, Roderick Ferguson, Brian Glavey, Scott Herring, Eithne Lubhéid, Victor Mendoza, Deborah Miranda, José Esteban Muñoz, Hoang Tan Nguyen, Juana María Rodríguez, Nayan Shah, Justin Spring, Susan Stryker, Shane Vogel


Keynotes and New Deadline: Aesthetics of Renewal

Tuesday, May 24, 2011 - 11:21am
Canadian Association of American Studies

We are pleased to announce the plenary speakers for the 2011 conference, they are Linda Hutcheon and Michael Hutcheon, and Anthony Stewart. Further, the new deadline is 15 July 2011.


The Aesthetics of Renewal or "Everything Old is New Again"

3 – 6 November, 2011

Ottawa, Ontario

Carleton University's Centre for Research in American Studies invites submissions for the annual conference for the Canadian Association of American Studies to be held in Ottawa, Ontario from November 3rd – 6th, 2011. This year's theme is: "The Aesthetics of Renewal or 'Everything Old is New Again.'"

Forum Issue 13: "Vengeance" (1st September 2011)

Tuesday, May 24, 2011 - 6:49am
Forum, Postgraduate Journal of Culture & the Arts (

Issue theme: Vengeance
Deadline: 1st September 2011

"Vengeance offers the writer a compelling mix of ingredients: strong situations shaped by violence; ethical issues for debate;
a volatile, emotive mixture of loss and agitated grievance. The avenger, isolated and vulnerable, can achieve heroic grandeur by coming to personify nemesis." – John Kerrigan, Revenge Tragedy