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Victorian Medievalisms: Speculum Societatis—A Mirror for Society

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 2:18pm
BemidjiState University British Studies

The Victorian Age in many ways looked back to the medieval period as a time that was more stable, that embodied ideals to be emulated in the modern world, for examples of sound leadership, orthodox belief and faith, and divinely ordained social structures. These medievalisms took many forms, including Alfredian celebrations, interest in Arthurian romances, neo-Gothic architecture, reforms in the Church, Pre-Raphaelite paintings of knights and ladies, and Count Dracula. The medieval in all its forms was shaped into a mirror by which the Victorians both escaped their own world but also harnessed the old to help form the new world of the 19th century.

Dance and Somatic Practices Conference, 8 -10 July 2011

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 10:49am
Coventry University, School of Art & Design

Fostering trans-disciplinary perspectives on embodied process and performance

This three day event invites somatic practitioners, dance artists and scholars from a range of disciplines to discuss, envision and critically engage with embodied processes and performance.

With the aim to discover correspondences, cultivate inquiry and transverse discipline borders this event seeks to collaboratively investigate the potentials of embodied thinking and action, to develop visions for future practice, methodologies and theorising.

[UPDATE] Flann O'Brien Centenary Conference, Vienna - NEW CFP, deadline extended to Feb 21

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 9:50am
100 Myles: The International Flann O'Brien Centenary Conference

To celebrate Flann O'Brien's centenary year, the Department of English Studies at the University of Vienna invites panel and paper proposals for 100 Myles: The International Flann O'Brien Centenary Conference (July 24-26, 2011) by the new deadline of February 21.

CFP: Fear, Horror and Terror 5 (September, 2011; Oxford, United Kingdom)

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 7:09am
Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Net

5th Global Conference
Fear, Horror and Terror

Tuesday 6th September 2011 – Thursday 8th September 2011
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference seeks to examine and explore issues which lie at the interface of fear, horror and terror. In particular the project is interested in investigating the various contexts of fear, horror and terror, and assessing issues surrounding the artistic, cinematic, literary, moral, social, (geo) political, philosophical, psychological and religious significance of them, both individually and together.

A New Ireland? Representations of History Past and Present in Literature and Culture (DUCIS, Sweden 3-4 November 2011)

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 - 4:33am
Dalarna University Centre for Irish Studies, DUCIS - Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden

History and the related memory processes of remembering and forgetting have been crucial concepts in the definition of communal belonging in Ireland, as especially underscored by the nation-building process that unfolded at the end of the nineteenth century. However, the globalisation and cosmopolitisation of Ireland as experienced in the last decade and a half, together with the strained socio-economic circumstances of contemporary Ireland, has arguably provoked the need for cultural and literary artifacts to concentrate on the present in an attempt to comprehend and come to terms with the momentous transformations that the island has experienced in the last few years.

Imagined Encounters: Historiographies for a New World [Due: 30 January 2011]

Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - 10:04pm

Session at the 2011 Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting, Archaeology of and in the Contemporary World, University of California, Berkeley, 6-8 May 2011

In José Saramago's História do Cerco de Lisboa (1989), a transgressive proofreader alters the course of history with the insertion into a text of a single word, not. Negating a crucial statement in a text on the siege of Lisbon, the proofreader sets out to rewrite history. Archaeologists and art historians by reconstructing objects and audiences produce narratives on visual encounters. Through excavations, primary texts, and artifacts, cultures of reception are articulated and experiences with objects are extrapolated.