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Ist International Conference on Ancient Drama - The Forgotten Theatre

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:24pm
Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico Università degli Studi di Torino
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017

 CALL FOR PAPERFor young researchers, Ph.D. students and Professorsdeadlyne 31th aug 2017 Ist International Conference on Ancient DramaThe Forgotten Theatre 30th November – 1th December 2017University of Turin (Italy)Aula magna, Palazzo del Rettorato Conference coordinator Francesco Carpanelli (Professor of Greek-Latin theatre, University of Turin),Keynote speaker Enrico V. Maltese (Head of the Deparment of Classics, University of Turin). The Centro Studi sul Teatro Classico (Center for Studies on Classic Theatre) has scheduled for 30th November-1th December 2017 its first academic conference for young researchers, Ph.D.

What is the Absurd? (NeMLA 2018 - Roundtable)

updated: 
Thursday, September 28, 2017 - 1:40pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

NeMLA Annual Convention - Pittsburgh, PA - 12-15 April, 2018

For a time, the Absurd was one of the chief literary movements of the day. When Martin Esslin published The Theatre of the Absurd he would frame various emerging playwrights such as Ionesco, Beckett and Pinter under one label. Though they would reject the term, the notion of the Absurd stuck and would invite a flurry of criticism from the academic world.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Performing The Early Modern English Woman (1500-1710): Seeing and Being Seen on the Domestic, Civic, and Dramatic Stage.

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:36pm
PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 26, 2017

or Early Modern Women, the very act of seeing or being seeing was fraught. Whether in their domestic roles or later as they first appeared on English stages, much was talked about the gaze of the early modern woman and the sway she held over others' gazes. Whether she was catching the eye of a potential lover or looking longingly after her children, her freedom, her future, the language of sight surrounds these women. This panel will look for papers exploring the theatrical power within these depictions of women seeing and being seen. The performative nature of being a woman who must appear chaste while remaining sexually desirable.

South Asian Culture: Tradition, Transgression, and Dialogue.

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:34pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

This panel will explore the complex and evolving relationships between tradition, transgression, and dialogue in South Asian Culture. Because of the complexity of these issues, we are not insisting on a specific time-frame. While the accent will be on contemporary life, participants may want to focus on the past, near or distant.

Call for Arts, Entertainment, and Digital Media Workshops and Master Classes (Deadline June 1, 2017)

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:52pm
Long Beach Indie International Fillm, Media, and Music Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017

Call for Arts, Entertainment, and Digital Media Workshops and Master Classes (Deadline June 1, 2017)

Long Beach Indie Film, Media and Music Conference

(August 30-September 3, 2017)

www.longbeachindie.com

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2017

Celebrating global diversity, the Long Beach Indie International Film, Media and Music Festival (August 30-September 3, 2017) is looking for scholars, journalists, and entertainment industry professionals to bring their intellect, art, and energy this year’s Film, Media and Music Conference.

NeMLA 2018: (Im)possible Bodies: Spaces and the Body in Early Modern Europe

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:59pm
Stephanie Shiflett (BU) and Ashley M. Voeks (UT Austin)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

This panel explores the spatial limits of bodies in early modern Europe. The spatial limits of bodies, broadly conceived, refer to the determinant role that real or abstract boundaries play on the physical and/or imagined body. These limits can take many forms, including aesthetic conventions, battlefields, domestic confines, geographic boundaries, and religious sites. Notions of the body may be equally diverse, extending to animals, communities, environments, and genders. Panel discussion will provide a rich examination of intersections between spatial perspectives and studies of early modern bodies.

 

American Dramaturgies for the 21st century

updated: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 4:59pm
Marie Pecorari & Julie Vatain-Corfdir (Paris-Sorbonne)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 30, 2017

American Dramaturgies for the 21st Century
Engaging with the new millennium on stage

Université Paris-Sorbonne – March 15-16, 2018

The Literary Interface

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:40pm
The Australian National University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

This convention will bring together scholars working across the broad field of literary studies to discuss the literary as an interface between different forms of knowledge and processes of knowledge formation, looking at questions of how and through what means the literary is communicated, represented, negotiated, and remade. By placing the concept of the literary centre-stage while at the same time interrogating its role as an interface, we wish to open up for discussion questions about the role, dynamism, and value of the literary in a time of institutional change and ongoing disciplinary formation.

Imagining Other Worlds: Setting in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 - 6:42pm
Philip Goldfarb Styrt/Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Every play imagines its own world—but the worlds they imagine must in some way connect with their audience. This panel invites perspectives on early modern English drama that considers the balance between these two poles: the imagined world of the setting and its connection to the surrounding culture in early modern England. This balance is particularly important in early modern English drama for both historical reasons—an increased awareness of other worlds and their different reality within the expanding cultural purview of the early modern English—and literary ones—since so much criticism of these plays has focused on their relation to early modern England itself to the exclusion of their frequently quite disparate settings.

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