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Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education (Journal) - articles by 6/15/11

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:56pm
Dr. Susan Alice Fischer, Co-Editor

The editors seek articles concerned with English language, literacy and literature teaching worldwide as well as essays on literature and culture that do not specifically address teaching.

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education is an established journal (published by Routledge) for English teachers at all levels, including college and university, which encourages international dialogue between teachers and researchers on issues surrounding literacy, language, literature and culture. In particular, Changing English considers the future of English as a subject in the context of its history and the scope for development and change.

[UPDATE]: Great Writing - Creative Writing Conference [UK] (4/20/11; 6/18/11 - 6/19/11)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 6:32am
Great Writing - International Creative Writing Conference

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Great Writing 2011

The UK's 14th Annual Great Writing International Creative Writing Conference

Imperial College London
Saturday June 18th - Sunday June 19th 2011

Critical or creative presentations are invited for this, the 14th Annual Great Writing International Creative Writing Conference, 18th – 19th June 2011. (Limited remaining space – presentations from the UK, USA, continental Europe, Australia, China, and more!)

To be held at one of the UK's great universities and great locations: Imperial College London, South Kensington, a cultural centre for the arts, sciences, music and museums, close to Royal Albert Hall and right next to the wonderful Natural History Museum.

[Akademeia] Multidisciplinary Peer-Reviewed Journal - Call for papers (Submit for next issue by 05/31/11)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:02am
Akademeia

Akademeia is an open-access peer-reviewed journal that publishes outstanding work from a wide range of disciplines and from scholars of all training levels. We are currently accepting submissions from the sciences and liberal arts. Prospective authors should consult the most recent Guide For Authors, available on our website, www.akademeia.ca. All submissions (either in the form of research articles, essays, literature, hypotheses, canvas, or reviews) are subjected to double-blinded peer review

[UPDATE] CSECS/ABS/NEASECS 2011 panel, Adaptation and 18th-Century Literature--new deadline April 12

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 11:08pm
Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Aphra Behn Society/Northeast Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

Recently adaptation theorists have argued for a re-valuing of adaptations and of the dynamic between originary texts and their adaptation. Critics such as Brian McFarlane, Imelda Whelehan, and Deborah Cartmell have argued that adaptations carry "cultural capital" equal to the original's, and that putting a material, original text in dialogue with an adaptation provides an opportunity to revalue, perhaps increase the value of the original.

[DEADLINE EXTENDED] "The Immaterial 18th Century"--NEW DEADLINE April 12

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 11:03pm
Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/ Northeast Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Aphra Behn Society

Call for Papers
Joint Meeting of CSECS/NEASECS/Aphra Behn Society
Hosted by McMaster University
Hamilton, ON, 27-29 October, 2011

"The Immaterial Eighteenth Century"

Community Connectivities/Temporal Belongings Workshop 20-21 June apps due 20 April

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:25pm
Centre for Research in Socio-Cultural Change, University of Manchester

Community Connectivities/Temporal Belongings is a two day interdisciplinary workshop seeking to explore the interconnections between time and community, broadly conceived.

Broadly speaking, research on the problem of community has focused on the task of analysing, challenging and transforming how particular qualities or attributes (be it race, gender, sexuality, place, interest, affinity, history, class etc.) are constructed as being 'in common'. The interest of this workshop is to explore how time might be involved in the production of the 'in common' that defines who or what can be included in a community.

Black and Brown Planets: the Politics of Race in Science Fiction—Essay Collection, 6/24/11

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:04pm
Isiah Lavender, III

The mass popularity of science fiction (sf) has shaped the racial politics of popular culture. Through the art and science of governing the complex relationships of people in society in the context of authority, arbitrary, yet traditional, divisions of human beings along lines of color (Caucasian, Negro, Mongoloid, and Latino) have been mirrored in science fiction. In short, skin color matters in our visions of the future. Though W.E.B. DuBois articulates "the color line" as "the problem of the twentieth century" well over a hundred years ago (41), it still remains a fearsome and complicated twenty-first century problem. This problem challenges, compromises, if not corrupts, all endeavors to build a better, more progressive world.

MSA 13: The Global Reach of Modernism and the "British World" (Buffalo, NY; 6-9 October, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 1:38pm
Modernist Studies Association

Recent landmark works in imperial historiography by such noteworthy scholars as John Darwin, James Belich, and Simon Potter have noted how conceptions of the British Empire began to change over the last two decades of the nineteenth century. Where before overseas migration to the colonies had born an innate stigma, the development of faster communication technologies, the expansion of international finance capital, and the emergence of a cultural sense of pan-Britishness all contributed to a reevaluation of the role of settler colonies within the British Empire during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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