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C21 Literature: Launch Edition Call For Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, April 5, 2011 - 9:14am
C21 Literature, Gylphi

C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century Writings (ISSN 2045-5216) is seeking contributions for its first issue, to be published in 2012.

Articles addressing but not limited to the following themes are invited: 21st-century forms, genre and trends; the role of literary prizes and festivals; new authors; adaptations and innovations; the rise of the eBook; digital writings; creative writings; and, book clubs.

Articles should be 6,000-7,000 words and creative pieces 250-2,000 words.

[UPDATE] Aesthetic Mutations - Interdisciplinary Grad Conference -- Abstracts due April 7th

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 6:51pm
Consortium for Literature, Theory, and Culture

REMINDER: AESTHETIC MUTATION(S)

The 8th ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE UC Santa Barbara CONSORTIUM FOR LITERATURE, THEORY AND CULTURE (CLTC)

27 MAY 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS -- Deadline *extended* -- Please send by Thursday, April 7, 2011 to cltcucsb@gmail.com

The Consortium for Literature, Theory, and Culture, an interdisciplinary humanities research group at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is hosting the eighth annual CLTC graduate student conference on Friday, May 27th 2011. The conference keynote speaker is Shane Butler, Professor of Classics at UCLA.

Association of Asian Performance - CFP Due April 15,2010

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 5:45pm
Association of Asian Performance

ASSOCIATION FOR ASIAN PERFORMANCE
11TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE, August 10-11, 2011

The Association for Asian Performance (AAP) invites submissions for its 11th annual conference. The AAP conference is a two-day event, to be held at the Palmer House Hilton Hotel, Chicago, preceding and during the annual ATHE (Association for Theatre in Higher Education) conference.

Proposals are invited for papers, panels, workshops and roundtable discussions. Learn more about the AAP at http://www.yavanika.org/aaponline/ The deadline for proposals is April 15, 2011.

Posthuman Joyce

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 4:02pm
Peter Mahon and Matthew Brown

Call for Submissions: PostHuman Joyce: Machines, Informatics, Technology (edited collection)

"In conception and technique I tried to depict the earth which is prehuman and presumably posthuman." (Joyce, discussing "Penelope" in a letter to Harriet Shaw Weaver, 8 February 1922, Letters 1:180, Selected Letters, p. 289)

Post-war Incest Fictions

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:48pm
Emma Miller (University of Durham) & Miles Leeson (University of Portsmouth)

We are currently developing a co-edited volume of essays considering the development of Post-War Incest Fictions.
Although we are happy to consider all proposals that focus specifically on incest fictions we would particularly welcome those that relate to:

Law
Queer Theory
Poetry
Psychology
Narrative theory/philosophy
Theology

Incest fictions may be considered in the widest possible terms.

As we have a number of renowned academics involved, along with early interest from a major publisher, we require submissions of no more than 300 words, along with a brief biography, by the end of May, 2011. Please direct all enquires and submissions to both editors.

[UPDATE] Science Fiction Literature and Film deadline EXTENDED: April 15th (RMMLA)

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 1:23pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

The paper proposal deadline for RMMLA has passed, but one more presenter is needed for the Science Fiction Literature and Film panel. Consider the following topics:

posthumanism, utopia/dystopia, cyberculture, adaptation, postcolonial sci-fi, technology, steam punk, gender, sexuality, apocalypse, othering, ecocriticism, archetypes, the hero's journey, identity, time travel, film & television, etc.

Don't feel limited by the topics above; ALL proposals will be considered. Send abstracts to hqrq@iup.edu by April 15th.

Our Sea of Islands 2: Insular Spaces: Deadline June 1, 2011 (NCS, Portland, Oregon, Portland, July 23-26, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 11:17am
New Chaucer Society

The second of these related sessions focuses on ideas about insularity in late-medieval texts and artworks, including Chaucerian ones. What were the correspondences between ideas of religious isolation and geographical insularity? How were islands imagined in relation to each other within archipelagos? What were the distinctions between islands and continents? How was the shoreline an interactive space? Proposals are invited for 15 or 20 minutes papers that examine how people thought about insularity in geographical, political, religious, and artistic discourses.

Our Sea of Islands 1: Aquatic Spaces: Deadline June 1, 2011 (NCS, Portland, Oregon, Portland, July 23-26, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 11:17am
The New Chaucer Society

The main title of these two related session refers to the influential twentieth-century ideas of Epeli Hau-ofa, who reimagined the Pacific in terms of plentitude, networks, and routes. For the first panel, proposals are invited for 15 or 20 minute papers that use recent theoretical ideas about aquatic spaces to examine late-medieval texts and artworks, including Chaucerian ones. What does Britain, Europe, and the world look like from the sea? What shapes did medieval oceanic or inland water routes, vectors, and forces take? How did writers imagine (trans)maritime networks of exchange? What texts or topoi acted as agents of archipelagic and regional integration? What aquatic discourse were familiar to medieval writers, including Chaucer?

Das Wunderkino: A Cinematic Cabinet of Curiosities/7.28.2011-7.30.2011

updated: 
Monday, April 4, 2011 - 11:04am
Northeast Historic Film Summer Symposium

Die Wunderkammer (German for "the wonder-room" or "the miracle chamber") was merely one incarnation of the phenomenon of the "cabinet of curiosities" that first appeared in Europe in the 16th century. The cabinet of curiosities was based in the collection of objects, specimens and artifacts that inspired curiosity and wonder, and sometimes defied the terms classification. In many ways, the Cabinet of Curiosities was a precursor to the modern museum.

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