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New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities - May 11-13

Saturday, January 29, 2011 - 8:15am
The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference Committee

The Aberystwyth University English and Creative Writing Postgraduate Conference is accepting abstracts for New Horizons: Crossing the Borderlands of the Humanities, the annual conference to be held 11 May to 13 May 2011.

[UPDATE] Special Topics Session: "Productive Silences" (Annual RMMLA Conference October 6-8, 2011)

Friday, January 28, 2011 - 3:04pm
Pamela J. Rader/ RMMLA 2011 in Scottsdale, AZ

Special Topics Panel: Productive Silences
History and the history-making process, while seeking to remember, often call attention to singularity of perspective, which results in silencing the memories of survivors. Literature then steps in to fill the gaps or the lacuna of silence. In this imaginative, fictional realm, silence and those silenced by historians, dictators, and forgetfulness find agency. Understood as a form of resistance, silence becomes a literary ruse: a voice or a perspective that once lacked agency now finds a place on the page.
Narratives that use ruses of hidden or lost documents (such as letters, journals, and oral testimonies) are particularly interesting.

[UPDATE] Lost and Found: Nostalgia in Media - February 25th and 26th, 2011

Friday, January 28, 2011 - 10:13am
New York University - Department of Cinema Studies

Call for Papers: LOST AND FOUND: Nostalgia in Media

NYU Cinema Studies Student Conference, Spring 2011

February 25-26, 2011 -- New York University, New York, NY

The New York University Cinema Studies department is excited to announce the 2011 Student Conference. Each year, our goal is to bring together scholars from a variety of departments and disciplines in order to address the transformations currently shaping the field of cinema studies. We look forward to providing students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels with an opportunity to present their ideas to their peers. Organized by and for students, the conference offers a unique forum for intellectual dialogue and stands as a valuable learning experience.

Everything & More: Theorizing the Encyclopedic Novel... MLA 2012 Seattle

Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 7:23pm
Brendan Beirne, New York University Dept. of English & American Literature

This panel seeks to consolidate and refine our understanding of the encyclopedic novel as a distinct (sub)genre within the broader field of novel studies / narratology.

What conventions mark texts as encyclopedic, and how have these conventions developed over time? How does a text's encyclopedism influence its reception by literary critics and narrative theorists? And how does the increasing ubiquity and accessibility of information in our culture effect the way we interpret 'data-saturated' novels of the past and present? These and other questions will inform our discussion.

The Next Great Wave? Disruptive Technology, Innovation, Business, & Culture

Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 2:43pm
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)

Defined very loosely as relatively untested technologies that emerge into mainstream culture without a framing business model, disruptive technologies generate sudden and great appeal among users. Thought of another way, disruptive technologies blindside traditional market structures, capturing the attention (and creative energies) of users so dramatically as to leave individual companies, industry sectors, and regulatory bodies scrambling to catch up.

3rd Annual Graduate and Undergraduate Student Conference on Literature, Rhetoric and Composition - April 1-2, Chattanooga TN

Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 11:49am
Sigma Tau Delta - Xi Alpha chapter and The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

We are welcoming graduate and undergraduate student papers or full panel proposals that address any area of literature (British, American, world, colonial and post-colonial, medieval, modern, contemporary, etc.), rhetoric, composition, or pedagogical studies. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract to Submissions must include name, institutional affiliation, student status (graduate or undergraduate), contact information (name, phone number, address, email address), and a list of any audio/visual equipment needed for your presentation. Presentation time should be limited to 20 minutes (usually about ten pages).

Education and Ignorance: the Use of Knowledge in the Medieval World

Thursday, January 27, 2011 - 8:54am
The University of Manchester Medieval Postgraduate Conference

John Rylands Library, Deansgate
Monday 6 - Tuesday 7th June 2011


Modern historiography has often depicted the Middle Ages as a period of ignorance, dogma and superstition– a period in which knowledge stagnated and education was both restricted to a privileged minority and dominated
by the institutional and ideological authority of the Church. From the Carolingian Renaissance and the rise of the medieval universities to the condemnations of heretical teachings and the intellectual and spiritual
ferment of the Reformation, the reality about education and knowledge in the medieval world is undoubtedly far more complex and contested than this picture suggests.