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[UPDATE] Deadline Approaching (1/3/11) "ANIMAL.MACHINE.SOVEREIGN."

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 10:06am
Department of Comparative Literature, SUNY Buffalo

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PLEASE VISIT THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

http://animalmachinesovereign.wordpress.com

KEYNOTES:
Timothy Campbell (Cornell)
Catherine Malabou (Universite de Paris X-Nanterre, SUNY Buffalo)
David E. Johnson (SUNY Buffalo)

Contributors to the conference must be currently enrolled graduate students (in any discipline), and are encourage to engage in presentations that probe the political constitution of the human-animal divide as a condition for thinking sovereignty, the State, nation, law and politics in general.

Whose Right to Know? The Worldwide Web and the Free Market of Ideas, Vol. 1, No. 4 Spring & Summer 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 12:04am
Synaesthesia: Communication Across Cultures / Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Okinawa Christian University

Presently receiving and reviewing submissions for the Spring & Summer 2011 issue.

Authors are asked to examine meanings or perceptions of 'freedom' and/or 'speech' across the Worldwide Web that clash or align with conventional wisdom or common practices.

Possible themes, topics to be explored (in no way exhaustive):

1. How is the Worldwide Web used as a political, cultural, economic, military, or hegemonic tool to maintain free speech or curb it?

2. How does the Worldwide Web itself embody a political, cultural, military, economic, or hegemonic agenda?

3. What are the underlying, un-stated aims of those people or institutions that seek to limit the free market of ideas?

[UPDATE] EXTENDED DEADLINE to JAN 15th! Writing Democracy: A Rhetoric of (T)Here

updated: 
Monday, December 20, 2010 - 5:23pm
EGAD!/Federation Rhetoric Symposium

GOOD NEWS: Deadline has been extended to January 15, 2011.

Writing Democracy: A Rhetoric of (T)Here
Increasingly, humanities scholars and educators are attending to the local, the everyday, the public, and the “ordinary.” Trends like these in rhetoric and composition suggest the field has taken what Paula Matthieu has called “the public turn” (Tactics of Hope, 2005) and foreground the real-world implications of and applications for our work. Such trends also illuminate tensions and stark contrasts between constructs like public and private (Welch, Living Room, 2008), local and global (Gold, Rhetoric at the Margins, 2008), here and there, us and them (Duffy, Writing From These Roots, 2007).

[UPDATE] Rupture Symposium 6 June 2011 (abstracts due 1 February 2011)

updated: 
Monday, December 20, 2010 - 1:39am
The Division of English / Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

The Division of English at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in association with the Centre for Liberal Arts and Social Sciences [CLASS], is organizing a one-day international postgraduate conference on the subject of "rupture" in literature on 6 June 2011.

[UPDATED] The New Urgency: Emerging, Evolving, and Redefining Literature

updated: 
Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 9:28pm
Brooklyn College Graduate English Conference

Fourth Annual Brooklyn College Graduate English Conference
April 30, 2011, Brooklyn College
Keynote Speaker: Cyrus R. K. Patell, New York University

"One is surprised, one is disturbed, one desires something familiar to hold on to- As soon as we are shown something old in the new, we are calmed. The supposed instinct for causality is only fear of the unfamiliar and the attempt to discover something familiar in it- a search, not for causes, but for the familiar."
– Friedrich Nietzsche, from The Will to Power

Special Issue: "Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet"

updated: 
Sunday, December 19, 2010 - 12:08pm
Jason Farman / Future Internet Journal

In the first lines of Howard Rheingold's seminal book on pervasive computing, Smart Mobs, he notes an observation he had in Japan that changed the way he thought about mobile technologies: "The first signs of the next shift began to reveal themselves to me on a spring afternoon. That was when I began to notice people on the streets of Tokyo staring at their mobile phones instead of talking to them" (2002, p. xi). This shift from using a mobile device as a voice communication medium toward usages that focus on data (specifically the "mobile Internet") heralds the era of physical and pervasive computing culture.

[Inter]sections Call for Papers and Peer Reviewers

updated: 
Saturday, December 18, 2010 - 3:49am
[Inter]sections, the peer-reviewed American Studies journal at the University of Bucharest

[Inter]sections is the trimestrial peer-reviewed American Studies journal at the University of Bucharest. We are now accepting academic papers, reviews, and interviews for inclusion in our March 2011 issue. The deadline for submissions is January 31st, 2011.

Because of the large number of submissions we've been getting, we need more people on our peer-reviewing team. Those interested should send us a short bio (no more than 200 words), as well as a writing sample (between 3,000 and 7,000 words) and a list of the main areas they would be prepared to cover. The deadline for peer reviewing applications is also January 31st, 2011.

Impersonality beyond "Tradition" (MSA, Oct. 6-9, Buffalo, NY)

updated: 
Friday, December 17, 2010 - 9:44pm
Claire Laville/Modernist Studies Association

Impersonality is usually linked to "Tradition and the Individual Talent," in which T.S. Eliot famously declares, "The progress of an artist is a continual self-sacrifice, a continual extinction of personality." For this panel, I am seeking papers that dislodge the impersonal from Eliot's vision of a cohesive European canon. This may mean sidestepping Eliot and his legacy entirely or reconsidering its premises. Where can modernists find an account of the "process of depersonalization"? Could it be narrated in the first person? Does the impersonal have a history? a future?

[UPDATE] Rebecca Harding Davis in Boston and Davis's Civil War Writings: American Literature Association, May 26-29 2010

updated: 
Friday, December 17, 2010 - 2:11pm
Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World

Call for Papers: Rebecca Harding Davis in Boston and Davis's Civil War Writings: American Literature Association annual conference, May 26-29, 2011

The Society for the Study of Rebecca Harding Davis and Her World will host two sessions at the annual conference of the American Literature Association. The conference will be held May 26-29, 2011, at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, Massachusetts. For further information about the conference, please consult the ALA website at www.americanliterature.org

Extended Deadline for Abstracts: January 15, 2011

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