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Literary Festival 3/31 - 4/1 2011

updated: 
Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 1:26pm
Newman University

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Newman University English Department presents:

11th annual Literary Festival & Scholars Day
"The Well-Spread Fable: Food and Its Meanings"

Conference Description: Food is something we all think about every day—sometimes as scholars, and certainly as eaters. How have cultures been shaped by food production? How has food been used symbolically? What does it mean to eat? These and other questions will guide our discussions of the many meanings of food. Although the theme of the literary festival is "food," the Scholars Day in which it is set encompasses submissions of work on any topic and in any format. Essays, poster presentations, and artwork from all disciplines are welcome and encouraged.

Polymath: An Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Journal

updated: 
Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 10:14am
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Polymath is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to interdisciplinarity, published in quarterly installments in an electronic format at no charge to its readers. The journal celebrates the oft-neglected connections between humanities (Language, Literature, History, Philosophy, Speech and Communication), social sciences (History, Sociology, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work), physical sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics), and the arts (Dance, Theatre, Music, Visual Arts) where the disciplines can unite, collaborate, and engage with each other towards shared research-oriented and educational goals.

Evidence and the Early Modern Period (Feb. 18-19, 2011)

updated: 
Thursday, October 28, 2010 - 12:09am
Early Modern Colloquium/University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Please circulate widely and excuse multiple postings.
Call for Papers

Evidence and the Early Modern Period
A conference held by the Early Modern Colloquium
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
February 18-19, 2011

Keynote speakers: Mary Floyd-Wilson (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Kathy Eden (Columbia University)

UPDATE: On DIASPORA WRITING ACROSS THE WORLD

updated: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 - 10:00am
Journal

UPDATE On DIASPORA WRITING

Scholarly papers are invited for a special number of an International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature, Art and Culture (ISSN 0975 2897) published from India. The proposed special number will focus on various dimensons / aspcts / issues of DIASPORA WRITING across the world. The selected papers will be published in the January number of the journal. And these papers may also be included in an anthology of essays to be brought out separately by a reputed publisher from Delhi.
The word limit is 2500 to 4000 words.

For more details please contact the Editor: editorial.2008@indiatimes.com

Lesbian Representation on European Television

updated: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 - 1:03am
PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations

PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations
Joint Conference
April 20-23, 2011
San Antonio, TX
http://www.swtxpca.org
Proposal submission deadline: December 10, 2010
Conference hotel: Marriott Rivercenter San Antonio
101 Bowie Street
San Antonio, Texas 78205 USA
Phone: 1-210-223-1000

Papers are now being accepted on topics related to lesbian representation on European television. Some possible television series include: Bad Girls, Skins, Sugar Rush, Plus Belle la Vie, Verbotene Liebe, and Hospital Central only to name a few.

Renaissance Translations, KFLC April 14-16, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 - 12:08am
Kentucky Foreign Language Conference/U. of Kentucky (Lexington)

Kentucky Foreign Language Conference
University of Kentucky (Lexington, KY)
April 14-16, 2011

"Renaissance Translations"

Oklahoma State English Conference: Transforming Words, March 4-5 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 9:40pm
English Graduate Student Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference. The theme of this year's conference is "Transforming Words." In his 1969 work, The Way to Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday asserts, "We have all been changed by words; we have been hurt, delighted, puzzled, filled with wonder." During the conference, we would like to explore the practical ways language functions to effect change. How can language overcome supposed barriers of race and gender?

UPDATE: (Deadline October 31) Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture (March 31-April 2, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 5:12pm
Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

The deadline is fast approaching to submit your proposals for the 10th annual Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture by the October 31st deadline. This year's theme is North and South: Constructing and/or Crossing the Cultural, Geo-Political or Metaphorical Divide.

There have been lots of new updates and plans made for this year's conference, including: keynote speakers Dr. Gerald Graft and Dr. Cathy Birkenstein, a night at the renowned music venue the Blue Moon Saloon included in your registration, an authentic cajun dinner at Randol's, and, of course, special guest Speaker Sandra Cisneros, author of "The House on Mango Street".

Apocalypse Literature Panel, American Literature Association (May 26-29, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 1:17pm
Amanda Wicks, Department of English at Louisiana State University

Apocalypse, post-apocalypse, atomic and nuclear narratives have increasingly shifted from the science fiction genre to pervade American literature as a whole. Authors such as Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy, among others, consider historical or imagined catastrophes that usher in new sensibilities, while simultaneously shattering connections to the past. Traditionally, apocalypse narratives attempt to assert order and coherence where none previously existed. Does apocalypse literature still presume control over disaster? What has apocalypse literature come to signify in the U.S.? What does apocalypse literature offer? How have imagined or real endings come to be portrayed in American literature?

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