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Oklahoma State English Conference: Transforming Words, March 4-5 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 9:40pm
English Graduate Student Association

The English Graduate Student Association (EGSA) at Oklahoma State University, an organization of English graduate students and faculty members committed to promoting student academic development and scholastic achievement, is currently accepting proposals for its annual graduate conference. The theme of this year's conference is "Transforming Words." In his 1969 work, The Way to Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday asserts, "We have all been changed by words; we have been hurt, delighted, puzzled, filled with wonder." During the conference, we would like to explore the practical ways language functions to effect change. How can language overcome supposed barriers of race and gender?

UPDATE: (Deadline October 31) Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture (March 31-April 2, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 5:12pm
Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture

The deadline is fast approaching to submit your proposals for the 10th annual Louisiana Conference on Literature, Language, and Culture by the October 31st deadline. This year's theme is North and South: Constructing and/or Crossing the Cultural, Geo-Political or Metaphorical Divide.

There have been lots of new updates and plans made for this year's conference, including: keynote speakers Dr. Gerald Graft and Dr. Cathy Birkenstein, a night at the renowned music venue the Blue Moon Saloon included in your registration, an authentic cajun dinner at Randol's, and, of course, special guest Speaker Sandra Cisneros, author of "The House on Mango Street".

Apocalypse Literature Panel, American Literature Association (May 26-29, 2011)

updated: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 1:17pm
Amanda Wicks, Department of English at Louisiana State University

Apocalypse, post-apocalypse, atomic and nuclear narratives have increasingly shifted from the science fiction genre to pervade American literature as a whole. Authors such as Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy, among others, consider historical or imagined catastrophes that usher in new sensibilities, while simultaneously shattering connections to the past. Traditionally, apocalypse narratives attempt to assert order and coherence where none previously existed. Does apocalypse literature still presume control over disaster? What has apocalypse literature come to signify in the U.S.? What does apocalypse literature offer? How have imagined or real endings come to be portrayed in American literature?

Evidence and the Early Modern Period (Feb. 18-19, 2011)

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 10:53pm
Early Modern Colloquium/University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Evidence and the Early Modern Period
The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
February 18-19, 2011

Keynote speakers: Mary Floyd-Wilson (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Kathy Eden (Columbia University)

Early Modern Migrations: Exiles, Expulsion, & Religious Refugees 1400-1700 — April 19-21, 2012

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 5:58pm
Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Victoria College – University of Toronto, Canada

The early modern period witnessed a dramatic increase in the migration, expulsion and exile of social groups and individuals around the globe. The physical movements of religious refugees triggered widespread, ongoing migrations that shaped both the contours of European colonialist expansion and the construction of regional, national and religious identities. Human movements (both real and imagined) also animated material culture; the presence of bodies, buildings, texts, songs and relics shaped and reshaped the host societies into which immigrants entered.

CFP: Afro-Caribbean Literature at CEA (11/1/10; 3/31/11 - 4/2/11) [update]

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 12:21pm
Laura Barrio-Vilar / College English Association

Call for Papers, Afro-Caribbean Literature at CEA 2011
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida

The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000
Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Afro-Caribbean Literature for our 42nd annual conference.

Columbia Univ. MESAAS Department 2011 Grad Conference: "Imaginary Geographies" Feb. 17-18

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 11:01am
MESAAS Grad Conference: Middle East, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University

Call For Papers

Department of Middle East, South Asia, and African Studies at Columbia University Graduate Student Conference

"Imaginary Geographies"

February 17th & 18th, 2011

How is it that the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa have emerged as separate geographical regions (separate from each other, and from other regions) in "our" imagination? How does this mapping serve the ends and guide the workings of academic and political institutions? How is it contested? What is its history, and what is the history of its alternatives?

CORRECTION--Natures 2011 [12/3/10;2/18/2011]

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 8:37am
Please note conference to be held on February 18 (not 28), 2011

Please see rest of prior posting for correct information. Only the conference date was mistakingly listed as February 28, when it fact the conference will take place on February 18, 2011 at La Sierra University in Riverside, CA. Apologies for the confusion.

Villians, December 15, 2010

updated: 
Monday, October 25, 2010 - 1:48am
Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies

This issue of The Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies seeks to explore the political, social, and cultural significations of "evil" (and its corollary: the "good") via a critical analysis of the fluid, mutable figure of the "villain."

A few possible perspectives for the study the figure of the villain are:

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