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Rubric Journal: creative/writing - Submissions open until October 1st

updated: 
Friday, September 3, 2010 - 12:48am
Rubric Journal

Rubric is an online interdisciplinary journal centred around creative writing. It is a space in which to explore the nexus of text and subject, and critically consider the definition of these terms. We welcome contributions of fiction / poetry / fictocriticism / electronic literature / writing and critical theory / practice-based research and as yet undiscovered modes in-between.

As of this issue, all submissions will be double peer-reviewed by our editorial board: this is an exciting opportunity for contributors to help shape the future direction of the journal. We welcome international contributions.

Compromising Positions: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the State of Missouri (April 7 & 8, 2011 )

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 8:41pm
Gender Studies Program, University of Missouri - St. Louis

Compromising Positions: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the State of Missouri

April 7 & 8, 2011

A conference sponsored by the Gender Studies Program at The University of Missouri--St. Louis

We invite papers, presentations, and panels that confront and interrogate the gendered, raced, and/or sexualized positions of individuals and groups in political, legal, historical, social, educational, and creative arenas in the state of Missouri from the pre-colonial period through the 1820 Missouri Compromise to the present day.

Hives, Tribes, Assemblages: New Collectivities

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 4:15pm
Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge

Hives, Tribes, Assemblages: New Collectivities
In introducing A Thousand Plateaus Deleuze and Guattari famously quip: "The two of us wrote Anti-Oedipus together. Since each of us was several, there was already quite a crowd." And matters only get more congested as their mental geography unfolds among landscapes traversed by herds, swarms, bands, gangs, hoards, flocks, packs, masses and multiple other collective becomings. This special issue of Rhizomes invites essays and multimodal works that consider new manifestations of and approaches to collectively, community or other multiplicities—whether inspired by D & G or not.

Hives, Tribes, Assemblages: New Collectivities

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 4:15pm
Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge

Hives, Tribes, Assemblages: New Collectivities
In introducing A Thousand Plateaus Deleuze and Guattari famously quip: "The two of us wrote Anti-Oedipus together. Since each of us was several, there was already quite a crowd." And matters only get more congested as their mental geography unfolds among landscapes traversed by herds, swarms, bands, gangs, hoards, flocks, packs, masses and multiple other collective becomings. This special issue of Rhizomes invites essays and multimodal works that consider new manifestations of and approaches to collectively, community or other multiplicities—whether inspired by D & G or not.

Objects of Inquiry and Exchange: Eighteenth-Century Thing Theory in a Global Context

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 12:13pm
Christina Ionescu, Mount Allison University, and Ileana Baird, University of Virginia

Submissions are being sought for a collection of essays tentatively titled Objects of Inquiry and Exchange: Eighteenth-Century Thing Theory in a Global Context. Whereas the temporal expanse of the "long" eighteenth-century has been repeatedly emphasized, its spatial inclusiveness and thematic coincidences beyond British (or British colonial) boundaries are still insufficiently addressed. This volume invites papers that may fill in this informational gap: they will focus on how the increased production and circulation of things during the century has encouraged processes of cultural, scientific, and commercial exchange that justify its consideration from a more globalizing perspective.

UPDATE--Second Call Personal and Social Myth-making in the Work of Margaret Atwood

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 4:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association

A central concern of Margaret Atwood's work has been myth-making. She has said the Edible Woman and Surfacing are about characters with unworkable mythologies. The Handmaid's Tale has been read as exploring potential consequences inherent in the beliefs(or mythologies) of religious conservatives. Her most recent work The Year of the Flood features a cult-like group. This panel seeks papers that examine Atwood's evolving vision of the role of mythologies in our lives.Please send 250-750 word abstracts to Mary Lannon at mary.lannon@ncc.edu

IN SEARCH OF SOLUTIONS: THE CONVENTIONAL, THE EXPERIMENTAL AND THE BIZARRE

updated: 
Thursday, September 2, 2010 - 1:52am
MELOW and MELUS-India -The Society for the Study of the Literatures of the World and The Society for the Study of the Literature of the United States - India Chapter

In a world that is rapidly changing it is inevitable that our parameters for the study of literature, culture and society are forever being re-defined. There are emerging spaces that cry for attention, black holes that have remained undetected for too long, alternative solutions that may provide an answer to many of our problems, and novel ways of negotiating issues related to the multifarious aspects of human life.

MELUS-MELOW 2011 focuses on these new approaches that (a) move away from the beaten track to clear fresh ground; (b) advocate the use of fresh critical / theoretical approaches to questions faced by human society; (c) focus attention on areas that have been under-represented; or (d) provide new insights into prevalent issues.

[UPDATE] CFP: Evil Children in Film and Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2010 - 5:11pm
LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory

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Call for Papers:
Evil Children in Film and Literature _________________________________________

[UPDATE] Questioning Hybridity-Discourse: Colonial Métissage, Postcolonialism, and Globalization

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2010 - 3:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 2011 conference, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

April 7-10, 2011

This panel seeks papers that address hybridity from colonial, postcolonial and global perspectives. Proposals should critically examine postcolonial discourse on hybridity and offer new theoretical and empirical perspectives on the problematic relation of postcolonial studies to globalization. Papers that question the role of hybridity-discourse as a counter hegemonic agency are particularly welcome. Please submit 250-500 word abstracts to Amar Acheraiou at acherayou@sympatico.ca by September 30, 2010.

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