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[UPDATE] Redeeming Modernity: Economy, Religion, and Literature in Modern America. NeMLA (Abstact deadline 9/30/10)

updated: 
Friday, September 17, 2010 - 1:12pm
Andrew Ball / Purdue University

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association
April 7-10, 2011
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ

The received wisdom tells us that the modernization of American culture and society was contingent upon its secularization. And yet, when we look to both canonical works of American modernism and to contributions to the "cultural front," we find an abiding concern for the religious that troubles this dominant narrative. This panel seeks to reexamine the multivalent modernist concern for the religious in order to reassess its place in early 20th century American literature and culture, to analyze the myth of the 'secular age,' and to determine the place of religion in the conflict between capital and labor.

MSA 12 Panel (Sub), "East Asia and Modernist Criticism," 10/1/2010; 11/13/2010 (3:30pm)

updated: 
Friday, September 17, 2010 - 12:15pm
Kevin Piper

This panel examines the critics and critical projects that grew out of modernism through a transnational lens that attends to intellectual exchange with East Asia. The study of modernism's interaction with East Asian culture often focuses on the activity of modernist artists, such as Ezra Pound's incorporation of the sinograph into his poetics. Additionally, many early twentieth century critics, who took modernist art and literature as their focus, were also drawn to East Asian culture. I.A. Richards, for example, set up the Orthological Institute of China in Beijing, and his protégé, William Empson, taught in Japan before moving on to the University of Peking.

First Fictions: 9-12th June, 2011

updated: 
Friday, September 17, 2010 - 5:40am
Peter Boxall, University of Sussex

FIRST FICTIONS
Festival and Academic Conference
9-12th June, 2011

Confirmed delegates include:
Kate Mosse, Jackie Kaye, Elleke Bohemer, Michael Prodger, Bryan Cheyette, Scott Pack, Nicholas Royle and Isabel Ashdown.

Supported by Myriad Publishers, and Textual Practice

We are inviting abstracts for papers for an upcoming conference on innovations in creative and critical writing.

First Fictions: 9-12th June, 2011

updated: 
Friday, September 17, 2010 - 5:34am
Peter Boxall, University of Sussex

FIRST FICTIONS
Festival and Academic Conference
9-12th June, 2011

Confirmed delegates include:
Kate Mosse, Jackie Kaye, Elleke Bohemer, Michael Prodger, Bryan Cheyette, Scott Pack, Nicholas Royle and Isabel Ashdown.

Supported by Myriad Publishers, and Textual Practice

We are inviting abstracts for papers for an upcoming conference on innovations in creative and critical writing.

The Adulterous Text

updated: 
Thursday, September 16, 2010 - 6:43pm
Neohelicon (Guest Editor: Dr. R.-L. Etienne Barnett)

CALL FOR PAPERS

THE ADULTEROUS TEXT
Special Volume of

NEOHELICON
(Vol. 40, no. 1, June 2013)

Guest Editor
R.-L. Etienne Barnett

DESCRIPTION

[UPDATE] 'Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance' Conference, University of Sydney, 10-12 February 2011

updated: 
Thursday, September 16, 2010 - 1:28am
Romantic Studies Association of Australasia

CFP DEADLINE: 1 OCTOBER 2010

This is the first of the biennial conferences planned for the newly founded Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA), to take place at the University of Sydney from Thursday to Saturday, 10-12 February 2011.

Plenary speakers:

James Chandler (Chicago)
Deirdre Coleman (Melbourne)
Nicholas Roe (St Andrews)

Panel discussion with the assembled editors of 'The Oxford Companion To The Romantic Age' (1999):

Iain McCalman (Sydney)
Jon Mee (Warwickshire)
Gillian Russell (ANU)
Clara Tuite (Melbourne)

We invite submissions covering the full range of possible meanings of 'distance' in Romantic studies – including (but not limited to)

Medieval Badiou: A Roundtable: 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 12-15 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 3:12pm
Ruth Evans / Antony Hasler, St Louis University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The panel will address the ways in which medievalists have created, or can create, a dialogue with the work of the philosopher Alain Badiou. What is – or could be -- the impact on medieval studies of Badiou's radical reframing of ontology? What do medievalists make of his insistence that philosophy must acknowledge its dependence on four extra-philosophical conditions of thinking, namely science, politics, art and love? What of his dispute with the linguistic turn in philosophical thinking and in the humanities' disciplines in general, a turn that has had a profound effect on recent medievalist work of the past two decades? How does Badiou figure as a "count-as-one" in medieval studies? Abstracts by 9/20/2010.

Medieval Lacan: 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - 3:05pm
Ruth Evans / Antony Hasler, St Louis University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

This session invites papers on Lacan's own readings of medieval ethics,philosophy and literature; dialogue between Lacan's
writings and specific texts/authors; the often but not inevitably vexed relationship between Lacan and historicism. Abstracts by 9/20/2010.

Manifest Identity - UPDATE - February 25-26, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, September 14, 2010 - 7:18pm
NC State Association of English Graduate Students



At our second annual Association of English Graduate Students Symposium, we wish to explore the many ways that identity manifests itself as an object for study. The concept of identity permeates every text, from its narrator's organizing gaze to the genre in which it is catalogued. Indeed, we invite you to question the term "text" itself, as "text" has come to be identified as anything from a novel to a Facebook page to a film.

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