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theory

Neoliberalism in the Americas: Brutal Experiments, Distressful Realities, and Conspicuous Contestations

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:58am
Graduate Conference of the Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures and the Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 20, 2018

Call for papers

Neoliberalism in the Americas: Brutal Experiments, Distressful Realities, and Conspicuous Contestations

Re-thinking the South in the North and the North in the South

Graduate Conference of the Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures and the Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory

January 23-25, 2019

Duke University

Keynote address: Vladimir Safatle (Universidade de São Paulo)

From Migrant to Refugee: Theorizing Diasporic Identities

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:49am
American Comparative Literature Association - 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2018

“Refugee and immigrant are very different. A refugee is someone ejected from his or her past, who has no future, whose present is totally empty of meaning. In a refugee camp, you live outside of time – you don’t know when you’re going to eat, let alone when you’re going to get out of there. And you’re also outside of space because the camp is a no man’s land. To be a human being you have to be part of something. The first time we got an official piece of paper from Canada, my whole family stared at it – until then, we were stateless, part of nothing.” 

(Re)Reading Capital: Critical Repetitions

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:04am
ACLA 2019 - American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

The global economic crises of the past twenty years have been accompanied by academic revaluations of Marx in economics and the social sciences, as well as a “return to Marx” in popular discourses concerned with economic justice and political activism. During this same period, however, literary studies has witnessed a turn away from Marxist historicism and ideology critique toward “post-critical” methodologies that emphasize weak theories over strong theories, textual surfaces over historical depths, description over suspicion.

**[EXTENDED DEADLINE]** EDITED VOLUME, CINEMA LIBERATION THEOLOGY

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:09am
Anthony Ballas
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

This collection seeks 4,000-6,000 word chapters on cinema and liberation theology for an edited collection which a major academic publisher is interested in. 

This collection focuses on liberation narratives which are in some way related to or inspired by religious traditions/literatures/practices/discourses from around the world. The films and analyses need not be explicitly religious in content, but need only to be argued in the context of liberation with theology, spirituality, or divinity.

World Literature and the Internationalization of Nationalism

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 10:04am
ACLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

The resurgence in the early 2000s of “World Literature” as a theoretical framework and institutional practice was coeval with another capacious category also prominent in the debates of those years: globalization.

ACLA 2019-Rethinking the Transnational in Film, Media, and Art

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:20am
Julia Alekseyeva / ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

The term “transnational” is frequently used in academic discourse but rarely investigated at length. Operating at a liminal space between national and global, transnational scholarship investigates the connections tying works of far-flung regions using a comparative framework. Yet as scholars of comparative literature, how do we theorize this framework? Does the transnational juxtapose, rather than compare? Does it strive to understand the influence of one national media on another, or does it go beyond influence?

NeMLA 2019: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018


Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Olivia Colquitt / Leeds IMC 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 24, 2018

This series of sessions proposes to explore the multifarious relationships between women and the natural world in medieval literature. We invite abstracts for papers on medieval texts of any language, genre, and period across the global Middle Ages. We particularly welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers, and independent scholars. After receiving all submissions, papers will be organised into a number of linked sessions focussing on more specific topics within the overarching theme of women and the natural world.

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

George Eliot at 200

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:22am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Middlemarch ends by praising those “who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.” This was not, of course, the fate of the novel’s author. Born in 1819, George Eliot became one of the best-known writers of Victorian England. In addition to her novels, Eliot wrote on social and religious questions, translated German philosophy and criticism, and lived in an at-the-time scandalous relationship with fellow writer George Henry Lewes. Few regarded Eliot with indifference: Nietzsche called her a “little moralistic female;” Trollope complained that she was “obscure from her too great desire to be pungent;” Woolf said that she created “one of the few English novels written for grown-up people.”

'Essayism': Special Issue for Electronic Book Review

updated: 
Saturday, September 8, 2018 - 1:44pm
electronic book review
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

electronic book review is currently seeking submissions for a new gathering on the theme of ‘Essayism’

Pages