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Premodern Futurities: Speculative Objects and Prognostication in the Medieval World (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:51am
Carly Boxer, Jack Dragu, and Luke Fidler
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 9, 2016

Interpreting the medieval arts entails setting in motion forms of anachronism; within the arts we see complex negotiations of temporality, which themselves pose significant challenges to our understanding of historical objects. Scholars have been both resistant to and complicit in these forms, a challenge of historicism having been, to a greater or lesser extent, to unlearn certain histories in order to “restore” the contingency of a specific historical moment. For, indeed, medieval people theorized futures of their own. They refined procedures of prognostication and speculation, and, significantly, crafted aesthetic objects that imagined divergent futurities.

Gendered Innovations in the Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:51am
Barbara Clare
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016

'Gendered Innovations in the Social Sciences'

7-9 November 2016, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

What impact does women's limited presence in key fields of research have upon our capacity to grapple with social and political change? And if gender is ignored as an analytic category, can the social sciences make a meaningful contribution to understanding or resolving issues of gender inequality in society? 

Nihilism .. Utopianism

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:51am
Modern Horizons
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 25, 2016

Modern Horizons Journal CFP – ‘Nihilism … Utopianism’

 

Modern Horizons invites proposals for papers (25-30 minutes long) for our sixth annual conference on ‘Nihilism … Utopianism’ to be held Friday, 27 October, 2016 at Simon Fraser University’s Harbour Centre campus, Vancouver, Canada. Proposals are to be sent to editors@modernhorizonsjournal.ca by 25 July, 2016.

 

Human Rights Discourse in Antebellum America

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:50am
NeMLA 2017, Baltimore, March 23-26
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel will explore the presence of eighteenth-century human rights discourse in antebellum American culture. We will have two goals: first, to seek persistences of eighteenth-century human rights theory even as it was eclipsed by discourses of Nationalism, European Imperialism, Anglo-Saxonism, scientific racism, economic determinism, and so on in the nineteenth century; second, to articulate the relationship of Enlightenment cosmopolitanism to the forces that would stifle it during the period between the American/French Revolutions and the post-WWII resurgence of human rights.

 

[UPDATE] Book Project & Journal Issue: "Performing philosophy, philosophizing performance"

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:49am
The Apollonian: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017

BOOK PROJECT AND SPECIAL JOURNAL ISSUE ON PERFORMANCE

[Selected essays from the special issue and other essays will subsequently be published as an edited volume from a major academic publisher in 2018, following the publication of the issue]

Neoliberal Tools or New Humanistic Critique? Theorizing Class, Race, and Nation in the Digital Humanities

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:48am
Mikinaakominis / TransCanadas. University of Toronto, May 25 - 27, 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 14, 2016

In recent years in Canada, the digital humanities has enjoyed increasing popularity as a tool for teaching, researching, and disseminating texts, and also a means of generating collaborative scholarship across disciplinary borders. However, the digital humanities, and perhaps its practitioners, have recently been described as a collection of neoliberal tools whose “institutional success has for the most part involved the displacement of politically progressive humanities scholarship and activism in favour of the manufacture of digital tools and archives.” Do the digital humanities represent a displacement of critical questions of power in favour of a cloistered technological positivism?

& Media: Film & Media Graduate Student Conference UC Berkeley

updated: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 7:44pm
University of California, Berkeley, Department of Film & Media
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 8, 2016

& MEDIA

Film & Media Graduate Student Conference, University of California, Berkeley

 

Conference Date: September 23–24th, 2016

Location: University of California, Berkeley

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Paper proposals due July 8th, 2016.

 

New Deadline: "Archives and the Management of Sex" at PAMLA Nov. 11-13

updated: 
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 - 11:15am
Pacific Ancient Modern Language Association 2016 (Pasadena, CA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

This panel will explore how institutions dedicated to the collection, preservation, and circulation of material knowledge manage sexuality. Sex materials create conflicting imperatives for librarians. As one collections curator at the New York Public Library recently told a reporter, "We needed to collect life as it was lived… It was always part of our mandate." Yet librarians at NYPL also had a mandate to protect the mass of pornographic magazines, pulp novels, and fliers they collected by carefully regulating access to them. Until recently, sex materials at NYPL labeled with three stars required supervision. That one example illustrates how sequestration generally determines who can read about sex and under what conditions.

New Deadline: "Archives and the Management of Sex" at PAMLA Nov. 11-13

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 3:24pm
Pacific Ancient Modern Language Association 2016 (Pasadena, CA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 1, 2016

This panel will explore how institutions dedicated to the collection, preservation, and circulation of material knowledge manage sexuality. Sex materials create conflicting imperatives for librarians. As one collections curator at the New York Public Library recently told a reporter, "We needed to collect life as it was lived… It was always part of our mandate." Yet librarians at NYPL also had a mandate to protect the mass of pornographic magazines, pulp novels, and fliers they collected by carefully regulating access to them. Until recently, sex materials at NYPL labeled with three stars required supervision. That one example illustrates how sequestration generally determines who can read about sex and under what conditions.

Comparative Imperialisms and Transnational Violence (Panel NeMLA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 1:15pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Abstracts for papers are requsted for the panel "Comparative Imperialisms and Transnational Violence" at the 48th NeMLA Annual Convention, March 23-26, 2017, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Please follow this link to read the CFP on NeMLA webpage: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16481

“Ungelic is us”: Queer Old English Elegies

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:01pm
Elan Justice Pavlinich, University of South Florida
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

This panel focuses on the instability of meaning in Old English elegies. Because queerness bears nuanced connotations that require individual definition, this session is open to a broad understanding of the term “queer” and how queer theory enhances our understanding of the elegies in Anglo-Saxon culture. Approaches may include, but are not limited to, manuscript history and paleography, generic conventions and their reception, as well as literary innovations within specific texts.

Beyond Monogamy: Opening Out Adaptation Studies

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:32am
PCA Conference/Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Call for PCA 2017 (San Diego, CA, 4/11-16)

Beyond Monogamy: Opening out Adaptation Studies

For a host of reasons, the basic structure of an adaptation study has been, historically, a one-to-one comparison of source and adaptation. And for a host of reasons, this has proven (potentially) problematic. Not that the one-to-one study, or singleton, can’t be well done, productive, and downright brilliant. Clearly, it can. But as adaptation studies moves toward conceiving and theorizing adaptation according to postmodern concepts of intertextuality, the singleton becomes less dependable and productive in developing forward-moving directions, strategies, and theories for the field.

Rethinking Early Modern Subjectivity (NeMLA 2017)

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:31am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Modernity is often defined as a series of political, social, and economic shifts related to the emergence of an autonomous subject. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus of how to measure the underlying forces driving this supposed change of paradigm. In light of recent approaches to subjectivity, we invite participants to circulate 5-8 pages papers (with theoretical or empirical foci on the topic) and discuss them after a brief presentation. The goal of the seminar is therefore to interrogate the condition of the “early modern subject” through the analysis of established binaries such as (but not limited to) unity/plurality, transcendence/immanence, individual/communal, East/West, local/global, medieval/modern, etc.

Philosophical Ruptures: The Counter-hegemonic Mission of Africana Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:31am
LaRose T. Parris/LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The literary productions of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century African diasporic thinkers are widely acknowledged as the discursive corrective to African enslavement and colonization under Western hegemonic domination. Olaudah Equiano’s, David Walker’s, and Frederick Douglass’s works emphasize the significance of ancient African history and agitate for the abolition of chattel slavery; in the early twentieth-century, W.E.B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction (1935) and C.L.R. James’s The Black Jacobins (1938) contest the Eurocentricity of traditional Marxian thought by highlighting the import of enslaved African labor to the development of the modern Western capitalism.

Mr.

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:28am
muhammad ehsan
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Historical English poetic comparison with Pakistani Poetical forms in Wordsworth and Shinwari’s poetry

 

Muhammad Ehsan

Ph.M Scholar, Department of English Language and literature,

The University of Lahore, Lahore-Pakistan

Mob: +92 3366317543

Email: ehsanlitterateur@gmail.com

Abstract

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