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[UPDATE] Australian and American Cinemas: Transnational Perspectives

updated: 
Saturday, October 12, 2013 - 12:19am
Pete Kunze (University at Albany, SUNY) and Stephen Gaunson (RMIT University)

Australian and American Cinemas: Transnational Perspectives

Editors: Pete Kunze (University at Albany, SUNY) and Stephen Gaunson (RMIT University)

"Cold War After China," Shanghai, China 27-29 June 2014

updated: 
Friday, October 11, 2013 - 4:15pm
ASAP/6 Shanghai: Modern and Postmodern Arts: China and the Present

I am soliciting proposals for a roundtable discussion on the broad topic of "Cold War After China."

The Cold War mandated that, from a Western perspective, China was "lost" in 1949 with the creation of the People's Republic of China. But this perspective depends on a bipolar global imaginary that views the world narrowly, as two opposed ideological camps. The "Cold War After China" roundtable seeks to complicate this view by exploring how the rise of China as a global power during the Cold War has shaped aesthetic, cultural, ethical, and political identities of the contemporary arts not only in China, but indeed around the world.

In keeping with the conference theme, paper proposals might touch on such things as:

ACLA CfP: Imagined Originals, Original Translations: Putting Pseudotranslation on the Map (March 20-23, 2014)

updated: 
Friday, October 11, 2013 - 3:12pm
Brigitte Rath

Cervantes' Don Quixote (1605/15), Montesquieu's Lettres persanes (1721), MacPherson's Ossian (1761), Mérimée's La Guzla (1827), Louÿs's Chansons de Bilitis (1894), Raja Rao's Kanthapura (1938), many of Borges' short stories, Makine's La Fille d'un héros de l'Union soviétique (1990), and Doubled Flowering: From the Notebooks of Araki Yasusada (1997) are only some of the numerous – often canonized – original texts that invite the reader to read them as if they were translations, to imagine a preceding original produced in a different language and for a different audience.

Unmasking Masquerade: Exploring Disguise and Display Across the Humanities (14-16 Feb 2014)

updated: 
Friday, October 11, 2013 - 1:53pm
McGill University English Graduate Student Association

"'Masquerades, I have generally heard said, were more silly than wicked,'" declares one respectable character in Samuel Richardson's novel Sir Charles Grandison (1754), "'But they are now, I am convinced, the most profligate of all diversions.'" Richardson's disapproval of the bal masqué's vulgar dissipation represents just one incarnation of a rich and multivalent concept. In various guises masquerade capers and creeps through the humanities, eluding any single form or function: noun or verb? literal or figurative? sinister or celebratory? deceitful or mischievous? We are seeking papers, panels, and creative projects that are inspired by this panoply of meaning to address the idea of masquerade in any way – material and/or theoretical.

Ecloga Journal of Literature and the Arts : Scottish Network of Modernist Studies Special Edition - 25th Nov 2013

updated: 
Friday, October 11, 2013 - 11:54am
Ecloga : University of Strathclyde : Scottish Network of Modernist Studies

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Call for Submissions

Ecloga : Journal of Literature and the Arts

Modernist Studies Special Edition. 2014.
Produced in collaboration with the
Scottish Network of Modernist Studies.

Ecloga : Journal of Literature and the Arts is pleased to announce a Modernist Studies Special Edition for 2014, produced in collaboration with the scholars of the Scottish Network of Modernist Studies and funded by the AHRC.

Aging and the Humanities, ACLA New York 2014, Deadline Nov 1, 2013

updated: 
Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 4:20pm
American Comparative Literature Association, March 20-23, 2014

Dominant representations of old age depict it as a period of debilitation and decline, frailty and dependence, isolation and loss of selfhood. Other accounts emphasize the experience of exceptional lucidity, insight, and wisdom that accompanies aging. This seminar invites participants to rethink and interrogate these two descriptive poles and attempt a more critically nuanced engagement with aging and old age. Papers can address aging from different humanistic and theoretical perspectives and approaches. They can also consider literary and filmic representations of aging that go beyond the accounts provided by the news media and sociological reports.

Possible topics include:

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