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[UPDATE] Child Labor and American Modernism (1890-1930)

updated: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 7:12pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)

We invite papers for a special session on "Child Labor and American Modernism (1890-1930)" at the 111th annual conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA) to be held at the Bahia Resort in San Diego, California, on November 1-3, 2013. Paper proposals should focus on modern American writers addressing the issue of child labor in the U.S. between 1890 and 1930. By 1905, 2,500,000 children worked in industry in the U.S., and by 1920, 8.3% of all children in the U.S. under the age of 15 were earning wages in industry (often considered "bad" for children) or agriculture (often considered "good" for children). Child labor ends (on a national scale) only with the advent of the Great Depression.

Time Travel in the Media

updated: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 11:46am
Joan Ormrod, Manchester Metropolitan University

CfP: Time Travel in the Media

We are currently seeking chapter proposals for the first collection of essay to address time travel across different media formats. The collection, to be be published by McFarland, will be edited by Joan Ormrod (Manchester Metropolitan University) and Matthew Jones (UCL).

[UPDATE] (Deadline: March 15; MLA 2014) Balkan Vulnerabilities in Contemporary Literature, Film, and Music

updated: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 1:49am
Mihaela P. Harper, Program in Cultures, Civilizations, and Ideas, Bilkent University

Is Balkan "always the other" (Zizek), and for whom? How have Balkan self-consciousness and/or image altered, if at all, since 2000? Please send an abstract of 250 words by March 15.

Possible topics include:

--figures of Balkan in contemporary national and transnational literatures and film

--new genres of music that evoke and transform traditional Balkan motifs

--interactions between Balkan nations and the EU

--current economic dimensions of the term "Balkanization"

--contemporary political parameters of the term "Balkan"

--traditional Balkan literary tropes returned to or recast

Native American Literature Session at the South Central MLA Conference New Orleans 10/3/2013 - 10/5/2013

updated: 
Monday, March 11, 2013 - 10:44pm
South Central MLA - submission deadline: March 31, 2013

South Central Modern Language Association is accepting 250-500 word abstract/proposals for its session on Native American Literature. Proposals are welcome on the full range of Native American literature and criticism.
Submit abstract by March 31, 2013 to Jamie Korsmo at jkorsmo1@gsu.edu

South Central Modern Language Association's 70th Annual Conference

New Orleans, Louisiana

October 3-5, 2013

Conference theme: "Masking and Unmasking the Subject"

CFP: "Literature and Pornography" Special Issue, March 17, 2013

updated: 
Monday, March 11, 2013 - 6:02pm
LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory

The dust may have begun to settle in the blogosphere, but E. L. James's Fifty Shades of Gray novels continue to dominate the bestseller list, impervious to the literary outrage that greeted their remarkable success. In the wake of this phenomenon, LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory invites essays on literary works that flirt with, dabble in, or wholly embrace the pornographic. We are interested in scholarly engagements with the history, theory, and politics of pornography, as well as studies of the popularity, reception, censorship, and "literariness" of texts considered pornographic.

Gay and Lesbian Studies, PAMLA Conference 2013

updated: 
Monday, March 11, 2013 - 4:12pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Seeking abstracts/proposals ASAP on various topics in the area of LGBTQ Studies in any academic discipline for the 2013 PAMLA Conference: Friday November 1-Sunday November 3, 2013 at the Bahia Resort Hotel in San Diego, California. Final deadline for proposals is April 3rd, 2013. Submissions should be sent in Word format to mark.bundy@ucr.edu

Pedagogical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern Studies w/ Keynote by Robert N. Watson

updated: 
Monday, March 11, 2013 - 3:04pm
UCLA Medieval and Early Modern Student Association & UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The last two decades have seen radical revisions to curricula at universities and colleges around the world. But have curricular changes been accompanied by pedagogical developments? When it comes to teaching, graduate students often learn by doing. By virtue of their experiments and their proximity to the undergraduate curriculum, they are among the most innovative educators on their campuses. The Medieval and Early Modern Students Association at UCLA and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies invite graduate students to share their experience at a conference on June 7 that deals with teaching Medieval and Early Modern material in the undergraduate classroom.

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