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Studies in Australasian Cinema

updated: 
Sunday, March 27, 2011 - 10:16pm
full name / name of organization: 
Anthony Lambert, Macquarie University

Studies in Australasian Cinema is an international refereed scholarly journal devoted to the cinema of, and film scholarship from, the Australian, New Zealand, and Pacific region. We would like to announce a call for papers for the following issues:

Issue 5.3 (Dec 2011): Cities and Australasian Film and Television

Issue 6.1 (Apr 2012): Imaging Religion and Spirituality

READING NATURE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE. MADRID, SPAIN (DEC. 14-16, 2011)

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 4:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Department of English Philology II (UCM) - Friends of Thoreau (Franklin Institute UAH)

Environmental disciplines have recently gained prominence due to the potentially devastating consequences of climate change: increasing natural disasters, the greenhouse effect, temperature variations, changing sea levels, etc. Such issues have raised awareness on the necessity for a drastic change in thinking. Ecocriticism—along with other green disciplines dealing with the relationship between society and the environment—places nature as the center of the intellectual debate. As Kate Rigby states, "culture constructs the prism through which we know nature." Reading Nature Conference aims to explore from a critical perspective how such a prism is constructed.

"Cancer and the Pharmakon" / SLSA September 22-25, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 3:25pm
full name / name of organization: 
Shiloh Krupar and Nadine Ehlers / Georgetown University

This panel is concerned with the ways cancer treatment regimes and medico-discursive protocols trouble the distinctions between "to kill" and "to cure", and the supposedly separate realms of life and death. Cancer compels examination of the pharmakon's dialectical slippages: cancer is met with the imperative to cure, yet the cure itself cannot be extricated from the call to kill; cancer is always indeterminate in that cell growth—usually the sign of life—is actually the first sign of death; to live inside cancer treatment is to experience a kind of death in order to prolong life.

UPDATE -- Textus: Gothic Frontiers. Abstracts by 1 June, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 12:18pm
full name / name of organization: 
Francesca Saggini and Glennis Byron

Textus: English Studies in Italy No. 3 – 2012: Gothic Frontiers
Editors: Francesca Saggini (Università della Tuscia) and Glennis Byron (University of Stirling)

This issue of Textus aims to showcase and provide further space for debate and discussion to researchers engaged in exploring, testing and redrawing the expansive frontiers of gothic and its multiple, evolving discourses.

[UPDATE] ***Could you hear that? Interdisciplinary approaches to sound and music.***

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 11:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
LASA2012 May 23-26 *San Francisco*
contact email: 

The 2012 LASA Congress will be dedicated to the bicentennial of national independence in most of the countries in Latin America. The aim of this panel is to generate a forum of discussion and theoretical intervention between and within musical discourse and questions of identity. How does music and its components, such as sounds and silences, promote or interfere with the creation of "national unities"? Are "samba", "tango" and "salsa" inclusive genres of collective identities? And if this is the case, what kinds of dissonances should we consider in order to gain a more profound understanding of these acoustic events?

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education (Journal) - articles by 6/15/11

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:56pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Susan Alice Fischer, Co-Editor
contact email: 

The editors seek articles concerned with English language, literacy and literature teaching worldwide as well as essays on literature and culture that do not specifically address teaching.

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education is an established journal (published by Routledge) for English teachers at all levels, including college and university, which encourages international dialogue between teachers and researchers on issues surrounding literacy, language, literature and culture. In particular, Changing English considers the future of English as a subject in the context of its history and the scope for development and change.

[UPDATE]: Great Writing - Creative Writing Conference [UK] (4/20/11; 6/18/11 - 6/19/11)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 6:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Great Writing - International Creative Writing Conference

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Great Writing 2011

The UK's 14th Annual Great Writing International Creative Writing Conference

Imperial College London
Saturday June 18th - Sunday June 19th 2011

Critical or creative presentations are invited for this, the 14th Annual Great Writing International Creative Writing Conference, 18th – 19th June 2011. (Limited remaining space – presentations from the UK, USA, continental Europe, Australia, China, and more!)

To be held at one of the UK's great universities and great locations: Imperial College London, South Kensington, a cultural centre for the arts, sciences, music and museums, close to Royal Albert Hall and right next to the wonderful Natural History Museum.

[Akademeia] Multidisciplinary Peer-Reviewed Journal - Call for papers (Submit for next issue by 05/31/11)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:02am
full name / name of organization: 
Akademeia
contact email: 

Akademeia is an open-access peer-reviewed journal that publishes outstanding work from a wide range of disciplines and from scholars of all training levels. We are currently accepting submissions from the sciences and liberal arts. Prospective authors should consult the most recent Guide For Authors, available on our website, www.akademeia.ca. All submissions (either in the form of research articles, essays, literature, hypotheses, canvas, or reviews) are subjected to double-blinded peer review

[UPDATE] CSECS/ABS/NEASECS 2011 panel, Adaptation and 18th-Century Literature--new deadline April 12

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 11:08pm
full name / name of organization: 
Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies/Aphra Behn Society/Northeast Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
contact email: 

Recently adaptation theorists have argued for a re-valuing of adaptations and of the dynamic between originary texts and their adaptation. Critics such as Brian McFarlane, Imelda Whelehan, and Deborah Cartmell have argued that adaptations carry "cultural capital" equal to the original's, and that putting a material, original text in dialogue with an adaptation provides an opportunity to revalue, perhaps increase the value of the original.

Community Connectivities/Temporal Belongings Workshop 20-21 June apps due 20 April

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:25pm
full name / name of organization: 
Centre for Research in Socio-Cultural Change, University of Manchester

Community Connectivities/Temporal Belongings is a two day interdisciplinary workshop seeking to explore the interconnections between time and community, broadly conceived.

Broadly speaking, research on the problem of community has focused on the task of analysing, challenging and transforming how particular qualities or attributes (be it race, gender, sexuality, place, interest, affinity, history, class etc.) are constructed as being 'in common'. The interest of this workshop is to explore how time might be involved in the production of the 'in common' that defines who or what can be included in a community.

Black and Brown Planets: the Politics of Race in Science Fiction—Essay Collection, 6/24/11

updated: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Isiah Lavender, III
contact email: 

The mass popularity of science fiction (sf) has shaped the racial politics of popular culture. Through the art and science of governing the complex relationships of people in society in the context of authority, arbitrary, yet traditional, divisions of human beings along lines of color (Caucasian, Negro, Mongoloid, and Latino) have been mirrored in science fiction. In short, skin color matters in our visions of the future. Though W.E.B. DuBois articulates "the color line" as "the problem of the twentieth century" well over a hundred years ago (41), it still remains a fearsome and complicated twenty-first century problem. This problem challenges, compromises, if not corrupts, all endeavors to build a better, more progressive world.

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