category: theory

From Scroll to Screen: Translation and Reading from Ancient to Modern (Deadline July 15th, 2011.

full name / name of organization: 
University of British Columbia
contact email: 
siobhan.mcelduff@ubc.ca

What does Rome have to do with Cupertino? Or the bulky and unwieldy technology of the book scroll with the sleekness of the iPad?

[UPDATE] The Citizen-Subject Revisited: Oct. 24th Symposium w/ Keynote by E. Balibar

full name / name of organization: 
Jennifer Greiman / SUNY Albany
contact email: 
jgreiman@albany.edu

The Citizen-Subject Revisited

Special issue, MFS: Women's Fiction, New Modernist Studies and Feminism/3-1-2012

full name / name of organization: 
Anne Fernald
contact email: 
fernald@fordham.edu

Call for Papers: Upcoming Special issue
Women’s Fiction, New Modernist Studies, and Feminism

Editor: Anne Fernald
Deadline for Submission: 1 March 2012

NeMLA March 2012 - "Continuities in English Literature between the Norman Conquest and Reformation"

full name / name of organization: 
Pamela Longo and Brandon Hawk
contact email: 
pamela.longo@uconn.edu; brandon.hawk@uconn.edu

Too often, students of medieval English literature unnecessarily categorize Old and Middle English as completely disconnected, highlighting Beowulf and Chaucer as the exemplary markers, with little in

Alone Together/Together Alone UCLA Graduate Student Conference in French and Francophone Studies, Oct. 6-7 2011

full name / name of organization: 
UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies Graduate Students
contact email: 
alonetogetherucla@gmail.com

Alone Together/Together Alone
16th Annual UCLA Graduate Student Conference October 6-7 2011 With Keynote Speaker Tom Conley (Harvard)

Human-Animal Relationships in Literature in the Nineteenth Century, NeMLA (9/30/11, 5/15-8/12)

full name / name of organization: 
Keridiana Chez
contact email: 
kerychez@gmail.com

Human-Animal Relationships in Literature in the Nineteenth Century

This panel explores how literature represents human subjectivity through interspecies relationships, to investigate how we produce ourselves by producing the animal producing us. To examine human-animal relations is to unearth the roots of what we understand today as the human. In the imperial/colonial context of the nineteenth-century, the representation of interspecies relationships (intimate or antagonistic) may establish the human/e as the rightful subject of dominion. At the same time, representations of animals may contest this material-semiotic imperialization. Using the works of authors like Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Joseph Conrad, H. Rider Haggard, among others, we ask questions like: what are the connections between our concept of human empires—and relatedly, human rights—and evolving attitudes towards non-human animals? How does the century’s “civilized,” “humane” subject embody those rights by the management—social, cultural, legal and otherwise—of his relationships to “lower creation”? Approaches using affect theory and/or cultural, legal, or science studies are particularly welcome.

5/15/12 Nuclear Criticism and the 'Exploding Word'

full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA
contact email: 
blouinmi@msu.edu

TITLE: Nuclear Criticism and the “Exploding Word”

Chairperson: Michael Blouin, Michigan State University

Conference on the Literary Essay - July 2-3, 2011 - Queen Mary, University of London

full name / name of organization: 
Queen Mary, University of London
contact email: 
essay.conference@gmail.com

Conference on the Literary Essay at Queen Mary and the London Review Bookshop, London, July 2-3

This July 2-3, there will be a conference on the literary essay from

[UPDATE] Unexpected Agents: Considering agency beyond the boundaries of the human (1800 — the Present)

full name / name of organization: 
University of Birmingham (English Department)
contact email: 
unexpectedagents@gmail.com

Online Registration is now open for:

'Unexpected Agents: Considering agency beyond the boundaries of the human (1800 — the Present)'

Dissecting the Lower Sensorium: Understanding Smell, Taste, and Touch in Renaissance Literature (NEMLA March 15-18, 2012)

full name / name of organization: 
Colleen Kennedy & Christopher Madson
contact email: 
kennedy.623@buckeyemail.osu.edu; cjmadson@buffalo.edu

Dissecting the Lower Sensorium: Understanding Smell, Taste, and Touch in Renaissance Literature

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